Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries posted in January 2017


Sampson Community College yearbooks

Day's Eye [1971], page 64-65

Day’s Eye [1971], page 64-65

Day's Eye [1970], page 44

Day’s Eye [1970], page 44

Yearbooks are some of the most popular materials on DigitalNC and Sampson Community College has provided eleven more!

Sampson Community College, located in Clinton N.C., has a vibrant campus community with students and instructors of all ages. These yearbooks document the academic programs at the college, such as nursing, drafting, and office management. In addition, they also contain many images of campus events, traditions, and fashions. Yearbooks like these and the many others in the North Carolina Yearbooks Collection could be useful for those interested in genealogy or those hoping to just browse through the images of people and activities at colleges and high schools throughout North Carolina.

 

 

Day's Eye [1970], page 25

Day’s Eye [1970], page 25

Yearbooks in this batch include:

 

To learn more about Sampson Community College, visit their contributor page on DigitalNC or follow the link to their website.


World War I Records Now Available from Wilson County Public Library

The United Daughters of the Confederacy World War Records of Lineal Descendants of Confederate Veterans, Record 1

The United Daughters of the Confederacy World War Records of Lineal Descendants of Confederate Veterans, Record 1

Thanks to the Wilson County Public Library, nearly 70 World War I lineage records are now online.

Compiled by the United Daughters of the Confederacy’s North Carolina Chapter, these war records document information about men from Wilson County who served during the first World War. The records include the name, rank, and address of the soldier, as well as when and where they enlisted, the camps where they were trained, and when the soldier was discharged. In addition, it also includes the father’s name and address, mother’s maiden name, and the names and ranks of Confederate ancestors. Although most of the items are hand written, the names, camps, and dates have been included in the metadata and are searchable.

All of the records are in great condition and the handwriting is legible. These documents could be extremely helpful for genealogists and researchers interested in both World War I and Civil War information.

To learn more about the Wilson County Public Library, please visit the contributor page or the website. You can access more war records from Wilson County within the exhibit Wilson County’s Greatest Generation: The Memories of the World War II Veterans of Wilson County, N.C.


More Chatham County High School Yearbooks now online

The Seniorogue [1947], page 54

The Seniorogue [1947], page 54

Thanks to the Chatham County Public Library, seventeen yearbooks from high schools in Chatham County are now available online.

The yearbooks date from 1939-1966 and feature high schools from Siler City and Bonlee. They document the lives of students and teachers from these communities.

High Schools in this batch include:

To learn more about the Chatham County Public Library and its collections, please visit their contributor page or the website. To browse digitized yearbooks from your high school community, visit the North Carolina Yearbooks Collection and filter by High School Yearbooks.

 

The Seniorogue [1957], page 83

The Seniorogue [1957], page 83

The Treasured Leaves [1958], page 47

The Treasured Leaves [1958], page 47


25 Years of the Wake Forest University Jurist Now Available

 

Wake Forest University Jurist [Fall 1988], page 1

Wake Forest University Jurist [Fall 1988], page 1

25 years of the Wake Forest University School of Law’s Jurist are now available on DigitalNC.

These campus publications document the updates about the goings on Wake Forest School of Law, the accomplishments of alums, and various information about the institution and the field of law generally. These documents could be useful for research

The Jurist was published in the fall and spring semester each year. To browse all of the digitized volumes of the Jurist, follow this link.

To see all of the materials from the Wake Forest University Professional Center Library, please visit the contributor page or the website.


North Carolina Federation of Negro Women’s Clubs

Sixtieth Anniversary Convention of the North Carolina Federation of Negro Women's Clubs, Page 27

Sixtieth Anniversary Convention of the North Carolina Federation of Negro Women’s Clubs, Page 27

Thanks to our partners at North Carolina Central University, DigitalNC has published a large batch of materials from the North Carolina Federation of Negro Women’s Clubs.

Founded in 1909 by Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown, the North Carolina Federation of Negro Women Clubs, Young Adult & Youth Clubs, Incorporated is a social service organization focused on issues that affect women, children, and communities of color in North Carolina.The group still meets regularly and many of the materials date from the most recent conference. This exhibit contains materials relating the organization’s statewide activities, including conferences, fundraisers, and service activities.

The group’s motto, “Lifting as we climb,” helps to illustrate the philosophy that drove the generations of women who participated in the Federation’s various clubs throughout the state. Members fostered the importance and value of human life and the constant desire for acceptance and worth. The issues that are closest to the heart of the NC Federation include fundraising for educational scholarships, providing Braille resources for the blind, raising awareness for sickle cell disease and HIV-AIDS, advocating for children, youth and senior citizens, and supporting the NAACP.

Constitution and By-Laws of North Carolina Federation of Negro Women's Clubs, Young Adult and Youth Clubs, Inc.; Page 1

Constitution and By-Laws of North Carolina Federation of Negro Women’s Clubs, Young Adult and Youth Clubs, Inc.; Page 1

These items, collected in a new exhibit, document more than 60 years of the organization’s existence. The batch includes several conference programs, highlighting the activities and people who embodied the “Lifting as We Climb” motto. Several highlights from this collection are listed at the links below:

To learn more about North Carolina Central University and to see all of their contributions to the site, please visit their contributor page or the website. To see more items like these, browse the North Carolina Memory Collection or the North Carolina Newspaper Collection.

 


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in Black Ink, a publication of UNC’s Black Student Movement

image_638x817_from_079_to_27673621-1The above image is the front page of the February 2001 edition of Black Ink, a publication started by the Black Student Movement at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1969. According to the Black Student Movement website, “Black Ink started off as a newsletter, revolutionized into a newspaper, and later transformed into a magazine…it grew to become the source of communication for black students, a voice for black issues and the training grounds for black journalists and business leaders at UNC.” DigitalNC has digitized 212 issues of Black Ink from 1969-2001.

To see more materials from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, visit their partner page. To see more recent issues of Black Ink, visit the Black Ink Magazine’s website.


Drafting, Engineering, and Child Care departments all featured in Pictorial History of Central Carolina Community College

Central Carolina Community College, Electronics Engineering Technology Students

Central Carolina Community College, Electronics Engineering Technology Students

Batch 3 of Central Carolina Community College’s photos are now available on DigitalNC. These images document the Drafting and Design, Electronics Engineering, Child Care, Drivers Education, and Continuing Education programs.

The exhibit, A Pictorial History of Central Carolina Community College, now has nearly 1400 hundred photos. Ranging from the early 1960’s to the late 1990’s, the photos document the academic lives and activities of students at the college. Many of the photos include descriptive metadata with the names of individuals that are depicted. This batch is teeming with unique images of this active and diverse community.

To learn more about Central Carolina Community College, the programs it offers, and the students, please contributor page or the website. To see more images like these, check out the Images of North Carolina Collection.

Central Carolina Technical College Day Care

Central Carolina Technical College Day Care

Police Science students, 1980s

Police Science students, 1980s

Electronics Engineering Student

Electronics Engineering Student


UNC student handbooks now available

26_27_001

Cover of the 1926-1927 Carolina Student Handbook

24 Carolina Student Handbooks from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are now available on DigitalNC. These handbooks span the years 1926-1952 and provide insight into what life was like as an incoming student during that time. The handbooks include academic calendars, campus maps, a welcome from the university president, and helpful information about what to expect as an incoming freshman. The 1926-1927 handbook includes a section about “packing your trunks” and advises freshmen to bring items familiar to current college students such as a set of bed linens, two towels, and a laundry bag, as well as items that may not make it on college packing lists today such as white duck pants, a typewriter, and a dresser scarf. The handbooks also serves as a reminder of how much UNC Chapel Hill has changed over the years. The 1926-1927 handbook has a section on student statistics that lists the student body as including 1,997 undergraduate students, 179 graduate students, and 125 “women students”. That is a far cry form the over 25,000 women and men that make up the current UNC Chapel Hill undergraduate and graduate student body.

These handbooks were published by the Young Men’s Christian Association of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and each handbook includes a special section detailing the association’s objectives, student officers, and campus YMCA facilities.

To see more materials from UNC Chapel Hill, visit their partner page.


1920s student survey and other new Stanly County Museum materials

cora_belle_lee_student_survey_00009

An excerpt from student Cora Belle Lee’s survey

New materials from Stanly County Museum are now up on DigitalNC. Included in this batch is a student survey from the 1920s, a 1944 ledger from the Albemarle Canteen, an attendance register from the Efird School, an Albemarle City Directory Supplement Edition from 1937, four issues of American and Efird Mills News & Views, and two scrapbooks.

The student survey from a girls boarding school in the 1920s gives a fascinating glimpse into the lives of the girls at the school, and includes information like each student’s favorite expression, flower, song, dish, and their “greatest desire”. Greatest desire responses ranged greatly from girl to girl and included, “to be a nurse”, “love and be loved”, “to see Europe”, “to get married”, “play a piano”, “go out west”, “to be a stage acteur”, “to be a missionary”, and “to go home (now)”. These questions also give us insight into the personalities of the individual girls. While some answered the questions dutifully, others had a bit of fun filling in their answers. In one survey, a girl responded that the color of her hair was white and that she was 8 ft tall. A few girls, in what must have been an inside joke, responded that their “first date with a boy” was in “1492”, with one girl responding “Aug. 9, 1922. (a real date)”. This fun notebook would be a good resource for investigating popular songs, slang, and dishes of the period, and it offers a wonderful personal connection to the girls at this school.

elva_jane_cathey_student_survey_00008

An excerpt from student Elva Jane Cathey’s survey

candy_recipes

Candy recipies pasted directly onto the pages of the Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture, 1918

Another unique object in this batch is an extensive scrapbook comprised of various news clippings pasted over the pages of the Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture, 1918. It includes recipes in the first few pages, and then newspaper articles about births, marriages, and deaths in and around Albemarle.

To see the new materials click the links below:

To learn more about the Stanly County Museum, take a look at their partner page, or visit their website.


Additional issues of the Wake Forest Student now online

volume_24_266

A poem from volume 24 issue 5 of the Wake Forest Student

New issues of the Wake Forest Student from our partner Wake Forest University are now upon DigitalNC. These issues are from 1900-1906, and  join the previously digitized issues from 1892-1900.

The Wake Forest Student is a literary magazine that was started in 1882 by the Euzelian Society at Wake Forest University. This magazine contains stories, poems, and essays by local authors, reprints of well-known stories and poems, and editorials and news items specific to Wake Forest University.

One recurring section, “In and About college”, lists sentiments and happenings around campus in successions of increasingly long statements. Included are updates on what faculty, staff, and students have been up to, facilities renovations and information, and recounts of special events. While this section always starts off with a few words on each subject, it ends in longer and longer paragraphs about Wake Forest happenings.

To learn more about Wake Forest University, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.

volume_24_261

The beginning of an “in and about college” section from volume 24 issue 4 of the Wake Forest Student