Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries posted in November 2017


Two More Decades of The Carolina Indian Voice Now Available

A snow celebration in the February 22, 1979 issue

Almost two decades of the newspaper The Carolina Indian Voice, from 1977-1996, are now up on DigitalNC. Provided by our partner, UNC at Chapel Hill, this batch joins previously digitized issues that date from 1996-2005. The Carolina Indian Voice was established in 1973 and continued through 2005, so now nearly the entire print run is digitized.

A painting of the Carolina Indian Voice building as shown in the January 10, 1980 issue

The Carolina Indian Voice  is one of North Carolina’s oldest American Indian newspapers. It served members of the Lumbee Tribe living in Robeson County including the town of Pembroke, which is the seat of the Lumbee tribe of North Carolina, as well as the home of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, a historically American Indian University.

The Carolina Indian Voice was published weekly on Thursdays and was a source for all sorts of local news. Topics covered included local politics and civic issues, cultural events, school happenings, and more. Articles on local and national civil rights issues and efforts to end racial discrimination pertinent to Robeson County’s American Indian population were also covered alongside everyday happenings in the county.

An article on H.R. 12996 regarding federal recognition of American Indian tribes in the August 24, 1978 issue

Click here to take browse through the digitized issues. To see more materials from our partner UNC at Chapel Hill, visit their DigitalNC partner page or take a look at their website.

The fifth grade winner of the Pembroke Elementary Read-A-Thon in the December 8, 1977 issue


New Campus Publications from South Piedmont Community College Now Online

Over forty years worth of campus catalogs from South Piedmont Community College are now online at DigitalNC. They cover admissions, student registration for classes, financial aid, scheduling, and the lists of programs and classes.

The Anson Technical College Catalogue for 1981-1983.

These campus publications range from 1972 to 2017. In the 1970s, it was still called Anson Technical Institute, but the name was later changed to Anson Technical College in 1979 and Anson Community College in 1987. In 1999, South Piedmont Community College was created out of Anson Community College and Union Technical Education Center, in order to serve both Anson County and Union County, where the campuses still serve today. Also included is a commemorative program for Donald Altieri, who served as former President of the college from 1993-2003.

Click here to browse through the SPCC catalogs. To learn more about South Piedmont Community College, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.


New Photographs and Documents from Randolph County Now Online

Outside view of the Strieby Congregational Church in Asheboro, N.C.

A new batch of photographs from Randolph County have been digitized and are now online at DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner Randolph County Public Library. Included is nearly a dozen photos from various people and places in Randolph County, including Strieby and Asheboro.  The materials are part of our effort to highlight underrepresented groups in North Carolina.  

A 2013 newspaper article announcing a plaque to memorialize the sit-ins in Randolph County

There are also several documents that have been digitized, including interviews and newspaper articles that stretch from the 1950s to 2013. They primarily cover the civil rights movement in Randolph County, including sit-ins at the Walgreens, Hop’s Bar-B-Que and a theatre in Asheboro.

Several of the articles are about the commemoration of a plaque in Asheboro to memorialize the sit-in campaigns throughout Randolph County. Reading these articles help give us perspective on the long lasting change and impact of the civil rights movement in North Carolina.

Articles about the growing Latino community in Asheboro and Randolph county are also included and can be seen here.

The photos from Randolph County are available here, and the articles are available here. To view more photos and documents from Randolph County Public Library, click here to view their partner page, or take a look at their website.

 


Even More Scrapbooks from the Francis B. Hays Collection Now Online

Photos of different buildings by Mrs. Addie Wood. The church (top right) was built in 1754.

Volumes 135 through 140 of the Francis B. Hays Collection of scrapbooks from Granville County Public Library are now up on DigitalNC. These scrapbooks add to the extensive collection of volumes compiled by Mr. Hays, an avid local historian from the Granville area. Each scrapbook contains a wealth of information relating to a specific subject, and many contain notes and letters written by Mr. Hays himself. This batch of scrapbooks focuses mainly on family genealogies.

1957 letter addressed to Francis B. Hays.

Letter to Mr. Hays about ancestral information on the Duty family.

Volume 135 is the church book for Granville Circuit, including rolls of congregants dating back to 1836. Also included are the church programs for Oxford Methodist Church in Oxford, NC from September 1941 to June 1942. Volumes 136 through 140 are various genealogies for local families, including information on family records, marriages, newspaper clippings, and photographs dating back to the 17th century. Also included are various personal letters to Mr. Hays.

For more scrapbooks compiled by Francis B. Hays, you can visit the DigitalNC page for the Francis B. Hays Collection or view our previous blog posts on the collection. You can also see more materials from the Granville County Public Library partner page.


Materials from our new partner, the Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County, document the North Carolina Veterans Park

Artist Aaron Wallace casts the hand of veteran Will A. Harrison from Guilford County.

Veteran Timothy Morton from Stanly County pictured with the cast of his hand at the North Carolina Veterans Park.

Materials from our new partner, the Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County, are now available on DigitalNC. These materials document the creation of installations for the North Carolina Veterans Park. The park is located in downtown Fayetteville, and was formally dedicated on July 4, 2011. Installations and plazas in the park explore the theme a “Veteran’s Journey: life before, during, and after service.”

The materials on DigitalNC concern the creation of the Oath of Service Wall and the Community Columns that are located in the Community Plaza of the park. The Oath of Service Wall includes

Materials from each county are represented individually on DigitalNC, and include information about the veterans, community members, and artists that facilitated the casting. Many include photographs of the hand molding process and biographical details.

To browse materials in the North Carolina Veterans Park collection, click here. To learn more about the Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County, take a look at their partner page, or visit their website.


New Scrapbooks, Letters, Minute Books, and More from Grand Lodge of North Carolina

A new batch of materials from our partner, The Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of North Carolina are now up on DigitalNC. This set includes minute books, scrapbooks, historical manuscripts, letters and charters, some dating back to the 18th century. Several physical artifacts have been digitized, including a commemorative apron and a souvenir pin from the turn of the 20th century.

A celebration for the installation of James Brewer as Grand Master in 1961.

The minute books are from all around the state, including Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Statesville and Boone. Also included is a letter from Edward K. Graham, President of UNC, to Grand Master Andrews inviting him to the 1916 University Day ceremony. There are also several scrapbooks included, with photographs including receptions and various programs, including the 275th Anniversary of the United Grand Lodge of England in West London in June 1992.

UNC President Edward K. Graham inviting Grand Master Andrews to wear his Masonic regalia to the 1916 University Day ceremony

 

Commemorative apron honoring the services of Walter Scott Liddell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To see more materials from The Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of North Carolina, visit their partner page or take a look at their website or our previous blog posts.


New Batch of Photos from Central Carolina Community College Featuring the Veterinary Medical and Welding Programs

A new set of photos from Central Carolina Community College is now available on DigitalNC. This is our sixth batch of photos and it brings the exhibit A Pictorial History of Central Carolina Community College, to nearly 2,800 photos!

A veterinary student holding a python

This batch covers the veterinary medical technology program and the welding program from Central Carolina Technical Institute.

Featuring photos from the 1960’s to well into the 1990’s, the collection for the veterinary medical program contains exciting photos of students holding and working with many different types of animals, including cats, dogs, snakes, cows, horses, and goats. Many of the students worked directly with the animals themselves, although several of the photos also show exhibit presentations and technology of the time.

A veterinary student clipping a cat’s claws

The welding program collection also has photos over the course of thirty years and shows off many of the technology and welding tools of the time, as well as how students also used hands-on learning in their classes.

A welding student working on a project

To learn more about Central Carolina Community College, please visit their contributor page or their website. To see more photos like this, check out A Pictorial History of Central Carolina Community College Collection and the Images of North Carolina Collection.