Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries by Spencer Bevis


New Yearbooks from Mount Airy Regional Museum of History Now Available at DigitalNC

A photo of the 1967 annual staff of the Stripes yearbook from the Martin Memorial School of Nursing

A new batch of yearbooks from Surry County are now digitized and available on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Mount Airy Regional Museum of History. Included in this collection are nearly two dozen yearbooks from schools across Mount Airy and Surry County, dating from the 1920s to the 1960s.

These yearbooks contain individual portraits, class photos, as well as photographs highlighting student activities and clubs, sports teams and events like Homecomings, faculty, and student activities. Some of the yearbooks also include class and school histories. Readers can also find in some of these yearbooks “last wills and testaments”, where the graduating class leaves behind objects, memories, and skills to the next class. There are also class prophecies, where the students imagined where they would be years down the road.

Follow the links below to browse the yearbooks from the schools included in this batch:

 

A 1958 photo of the Franklin High School football team in front of the school.

These yearbooks represent a valuable addition to DigitalNC, as they show what life was like across Mount Airy and Surry County throughout the 20th century. To see more from the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History, please visit their partner page, or check out their website.


The First Batch of Yearbooks from Hillside High School in Durham Now Online at DigitalNC

Group photo of the Hillside High School Band in front of the US Capitol

The 1963 Hillside High School Marching Band on a trip to Washington, D.C.

A new batch of yearbooks from Durham County are now available on DigitalNC, courtesy of a new partner, the Museum of Durham History. Included in this collection are two yearbooks from Hillside High School in Durham, the 1960 and 1963 editions of The Hornet.  Hillside High School was the black high school in Durham before integration and it remained a high school following integration, which was rare in North Carolina.  The school today has a long, proud history.    

These yearbooks contain individual student portraits, as well as class portraits and photographs of school faculty. The yearbooks also highlight aspects of the student life and student experience, including senior superlatives and class reminiscences. They also contain photographs and group portraits of student councils, clubs and activities like marching band and the school orchestra, the 1963 homecoming and a variety of sports teams. Finally, there is also a memorial in dedication to a student who passed away during the 1960 school year.

The 1960 Dramatics Club at Hillside High School

Follow the links below to browse the yearbooks included in this batch:

This new batch of yearbooks, the first of their kind from Hillside High School, is a valuable addition to DigitalNC. To see more from the Museum of Durham History, please check out their partner page or visit their website.


Dozens of Maps, Booklets, Brochures and Scrapbooks from High Point Now Available on DigitalNC

An aerial shot of the city of High Point circa 1955.

40 new maps, booklets, and brochures from High Point, North Carolina have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partners, the High Point Museum and the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library. These materials range from the 1930s all the way to 2018, really illustrating all the different ways that the city changed throughout the 20th century.

There is a huge variety of materials in this batch. The scrapbooks contained in this collection date from 1931 to 1944 and focus on municipal issues in High Point and the Piedmont Triad. Over a dozen booklets and programs are also included that are from the Community Leadership Development Program of the High Point Chamber of Commerce. These booklets memorialize the programs designed to inform community members about local issues and businesses, encourage productive discussion and develop future local leadership.

The 1992 class of Challenge: High Point attending a meeting at WGH Piedmont.

A number of other booklets are included as well. Many of them contain statistics about High Point at that date, including its tax rates, municipal features, population sizes, what industries are there, per capita incomes, and more. Many also contain photos of local institutions and colleges, as well as larger maps of High Point. Finally, this collection also contains several maps by themselves, including one map of High Point that highlights city limits, and others that highlight High Point as it is in 2013 and 2018.

To see more from the High Point Museum, take a look at their partner page, or visit their website. To learn more from the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library, please check out their partner page, or take a look at their website.


Luther Byrd Genealogical Collections from Surry Community College Now Online at DigitalNC

An excerpt of the John Hunter Family Record, who came to the US from Ireland around 1750.

Over 120 genealogical collections from Surry County have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, Surry Community College. Created and assembled by Luther Byrd, former Elon College professor from Westfield, North Carolina, these collections represent a huge variety of information about different families and their descendants living in Surry County. Many of the collections include documents, papers, newspaper clippings, and personal letters to and from Byrd about the family members.

The coat of arms for the Thrower family, included in the Arrington collection.

Also included are various family records and family tree diagrams, complete with indexes to determine where a given family member is located in the tree. One such example is the Hunter Family Record excerpted above. Looking through these collections, it is fascinating to see the staggering amount of documents and material that these families created and saved throughout the years, as well as the amount of work that Byrd put in to ensure that these collections are all relevant and well-maintained.

These collections represent a growing wealth of information about the history of Surry County. To browse through other materials from Surry Community College, visit their partner page or check out their website.


Massey Hill Heritage Discovery Project Materials Tell The Story of One Fayetteville Neighborhood

A partial map of the Mill Villages found in Massey Hill.

Over 120 new photos, news clippings, artifacts, and oral interviews have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of the Arts Council of Fayetteville, as part of the Massey Hill Heritage Discovery Project. This project was designed to trace the history of the Massey Hill neighborhood in Fayetteville dating back into the 19th century. Located between Camden Road and Gillespie Street along Southern Avenue, Massey Hill is a neighborhood that grew up alongside the three local textile mills and inspired feelings of family and community among its long-time residents, many of whom lived their whole lives in Massey Hill.

Exterior photo of the Massey Hill Hardware Store

A photo of the Tolar-Hart Mill Water Tower in Fayetteville.

 

There is a ton of variety in this batch, giving us a vibrant image of what it was like to live and grow up in Massey Hill. Dozens of photos are included, with many highlighting life in the mills, events and celebrations that were held for holidays, and pictures of local schools and schoolchildren. A number of newspaper clippings are also found in this batch, detailing many different parts of life in Massey Hill, including interviews with local residents. One resident, Ida Belle Dallas Parker, also wrote several short stories reminiscing on her childhood and family history in Massey Hill. Finally, a number of oral histories from Massey Hill residents are included – they also discuss their personal histories growing up in Massey Hill, how they feel about the neighborhood, and what it meant to them.

Having these materials on DigitalNC is an important reminder of how we build communities in our lives and what they mean to the people who live there. To browse through other materials from the Arts Council of Fayetteville, check out their partner page or take a look at their website.


Hmong Keeb Kwm: Hmong Heritage Project Materials Now Online at DigitalNC

Ten individuals in uniform standing in a group facing forward

A photo of Hmong soldiers graduating from pilot training in November 1973

two individuals in military uniform looking at the camera

Nao Chao Lo and Nhia Thong Yang in their military uniforms, circa 2018

Over a hundred photographs, documents, artifacts, oral histories, and other materials from Hmong Keeb Kwm: The Hmong Heritage Project are now online, courtesy of the Catawba County Library. This new batch represents the first materials on DigitalNC to come from the Catawba County Library. This collection also has the honor of being the first to represent the Hmong people of North Carolina on our website.

There is a huge amount of variety in the materials in this batch. It contains dozens of photographs of physical objects to DigitalNC, including colorful embroidered material, Laotian and Thai currency, bracelets and jewelry, and more. Text materials, like personal records, newspaper clippings, and program certificates are also included. A number of photographs of Hmong individuals, their family members, and their personal lives are also found in this collection. Finally, several oral histories are also included in this collection, allowing people to tell about their experience of coming to the United States. These oral histories are both available as audio files and as written transcripts.

Having these materials on DigitalNC represents an important addition to our understanding of Catawba County, and allows us to continue in our mission to digitize materials from all communities throughout the state. To see other materials from the Catawba County Library, visit their partner page or check out their website.


W.S. Clark Store Accounting Ledgers Now Online at DigitalNC

ledger page for Mrs. Judge Howard with products and prices

A snapshot from the 1899 Millinery Book Ledger

A new batch of materials from Edgecombe Community College in Tarboro, North Carolina is now online and available on DigitalNC. This collection contains several accounting ledgers from the late 19th century. These five account books are all from the W.S. Clark Store in Tarboro. The store, started by William Samuel Clark (1846-1923), was operated in Tarboro from the 1870s through the 1980s as a general store. By the 1950s, it operated as a department store that sold everything from furniture to clothing to groceries. It was continued for over 50 years after Clark died by his sons.

These ledgers were donated to Edgecombe Community College by his grandson, Clark Jenkins, and then they found their way to DigitalNC. They contain transactions of the wide variety of goods that people purchased, as well as the prices of various items, and indicate when customers made payments on their accounts. For example, in 1896, a pair of slippers cost $1.35 and a straw hat cost 15 cents.

Follow the links below to browse the items included in this batch:

To learn more from the Edgecombe Community College, click here to visit their partner page or click here to visit their website.

 


New Batch of Yearbooks from Central Piedmont Community College Digitized and Available on DigitalNC

A new batch of several yearbooks are now available and online at DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, Central Piedmont Community College. Dating periodically from 1962 to 1978, a few of these yearbooks date back to when CPCC was actually two institutions – the white Central Industrial Education Center and the black Mecklenburg College. Several of the yearbooks also specifically focus on CPCC’s Dental Hygiene Department.

Five women seated on a float that says "A growing flame in the Charlotte Communi[ty]"

Miss Mecklenburg and her attendants in the 1963 Homecoming Parade Float “Growing Flame in the Charlotte Community”

nurses seated at desks miming brushing teeth

Dental hygiene students learning proper brushing techniques in class

The first yearbooks in the batch, The Echo, from when CPCC was still Mecklenburg College, show what it was like to be a student at the time. Featuring student portraits and class activities, the yearbooks illustrate the dedication they had to teaching their students. The above photo shows Miss Mecklenburg and her attendants celebrating the 1963 Homecoming Parade in their float, “Growing Flame in the Charlotte Community.”

In July 1964, Mecklenburg College became Central Piedmont Community College, which still stands today. The later CPCC yearbooks, editions of The Violet Ribbon and Ordontos, are published for the Hygiene Department, highlighting their instructors, the department head, and students. Focusing on one department, these yearbooks are a valuable resource into an important part of the CPCC community.

To see more from Central Piedmont Community College, check out their partner page or visit their website. Click here to view other digitized material from CPCC, including other yearbooks, course catalogs, and scrapbooks noting CPCC’s history.


Genealogical History of Gaston County Families Now Online

A new family genealogy history from Gaston County has been added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Gaston County Museum of Art & History. The book, Our Kin, Being a History of the Hoffman, Rhyne, Costner, Rudisill, Best, Hovis, Hoyle, Wills, Shetley, Jenkins, Holland, Hambright, Gaston, Withers, Cansler, Clemmer and Lineberger Families, was originally published in 1915, but has been reprinted by the Gaston County Historical Society several times since and is now digitally available for all to read.

group portrait with two people in back wearing suits, and three people in front, two in dresses and one in a suit

A photo of author Laban Miles Hoffman (center) and his family, undated

The book focuses on the individual families of Gaston County, including their common ancestors dating back to the 18th century. Many of the family members noted have long descriptions of who they were, what they accomplished in life, how their family names changed over the years, and more. This copy is quite special, as it has retained notes and highlighted terms that one of the authors made in his original edition, preserved in this reprinted version.

Written by Laban Miles Hoffman of Dallas, North Carolina, this book was conceived as a history of his own family, but rapidly grew into an exploration of the histories of all the associated families in his genealogy. He includes a short preface of his own personal story, how he grew up in Lowell, North Carolina, studied at Davidson College, and later went to work in Raleigh under Governor Holden before moving to Arkansas.

As a record of ancestors for over a dozen local families, it is a valuable resource for Gaston County historians, Gaston County residents, and family descendants. We are privileged to make it available on DigitalNC. To learn more about the Gaston County Museum of Art & History, visit their partner page or their website.


Greensboro High School Student Magazines and Yearbooks Now Available on DigitalNC

A student speaking to a crowd of other students, 1958

A new batch of over two dozen yearbooks from Greensboro High School has been digitized and made available on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Greensboro History Museum. Dating from 1910 to 1958, this collection includes annual yearbooks, a 1906 copy of the Greensboro High School Magazine, and several issues of Homespun, Greensboro High School’s literary magazine dating back to the 1920s and 1930s.

These yearbooks include individual portraits, class portraits, photos of faculty, and more. They also highlight photographs of student activities, social clubs, the school’s orchestra and band, the school’s sports teams, and more.

The 1925 Greensboro High School Hockey team

This batch also includes copies of magazines that students worked to write, edit, and publish. The Greensboro High School Magazine, the first of its kind to be uploaded to DigitalNC, was published three times a year by the students, and included editorials, short stories, and more. One student wrote about his experience riding along with Presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan as he was traveling throughout the South, for example.  The school’s other magazine, Homespun, highlights the writing and literary accomplishments of the students, including smaller fictional short stories, poems, 1-act plays, and more.

Follow the links below to browse the items included in this batch:

To learn more about the Greensboro History Museum, you can find more information by visiting their partner page or taking a look at their website.