Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Nine new scrapbooks covering 1920-1974 from High Point Heritage Research Center now on DigitalNC

Nine new scrapbooks from High Point have been digitized and are now available at DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library. These scrapbooks are from throughout the 20th century, with a few dating from 1920-1940, while others date from 1963-1974. They join previously digitized collections, dating back to 1952.

Clippings from a 1967 issue of the Greensboro Daily News, where a new Anheuser-Busch brewery was to be built in Jamestown

These scrapbooks contain newspaper clippings from the High Point Enterprise and the Greensboro Daily News, arranged in chronological order. In many cases, articles were pasted and taped into the scrapbooks overlapping each other, so digitizing these required taking multiple images of each page. Some of the scrapbooks also contained handwritten indexes in the front for easy navigation. Many of the newspaper clippings related to local events in High Point and Greensboro. For example, one page contained articles about the selection of police officers in High Point, city employees attending a safety meeting, changes made to the High Point City Hall offices, and more. Other events covered included political events and local races, and decisions about town planning. Every so often, national and international events are also included.

To learn more from the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library, please visit their partner page, or check out their website.


Select issues of UNC Chapel Hill’s Asian Students Association publication East Wind now online at DigitalNC

 

East Wind Fall 1994 Front Page

Front page of the Fall 1994 issue of UNC ASA’s East Wind newspaper

Seven issues of East Wind, a publication of UNC Chapel Hill‘s Asian Students Association, are now available online at DigitalNC. Started in 1993, the paper appeared roughly once a semester for the first several years of its run. The issues now on DigitalNC (December 1993-Spring 1998) cover a wide range of topics relevant to the Asian-American student community at UNC. With its editorials, advertisements for upcoming events, restaurant reviews, and much more, East Wind provides a forum for both ASA members and others to promote, criticize, and discuss Asian-American culture from numerous angles. Much of the paper’s contents focus on issues of race and identity within the Asian-American community.

The newly digitized issues of East Wind are another addition to the already considerable amount of UNC Chapel Hill materials currently hosted at DigitalNC. For more information about East Wind and the Asian Students Association at UNC, visit The Carolina Story and its exhibit on UNC student organizations.


Maps, Sketches, and Blueprints from Chapel Hill Historical Society Now Online at DigitalNC

A portion of one map of Carrboro and Chapel Hill – showing Franklin St, Main St, and Greensboro St.

Nearly three dozen maps and blueprints have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Chapel Hill Historical Society. Dating from 1929 to 1963, these maps really illustrate how much the city of Chapel Hill has changed in the last century.

Blueprint of the west side of Dr. J.B. Bullitt’s house in Chapel Hill.

This new batch contains many different types of maps and blueprints, including cross sections of the Chapel Hill Municipal Building, a survey of East Rosemary Street, cross sections of local doctor J.B. Bullitt’s home, and Planning Board maps of the Chapel Hill and Carrboro region. Also included are maps for proposed developments of segregated cemeteries, which would have been established next to NC state highway 54. These maps are fascinating to see and compare to what we know of the area today, and to see how much has changed since these maps were created.

These maps are very large, with some stretching out to be over 6 feet in length! While most could be scanned with our overhead PhaseOne camera (our process is documented on video here), several were so large that they had to be framed in a vacuum-sealed rotating container so that they can be preserved in the highest quality. Some of these largest ones took two different shots to compose together, resulting in images that were 7000 pixels tall by 11000 pixels wide. That’s far larger than anything even the most high-tech cell phone cameras can shoot.

One of the maps being scanned inside a vacuum-sealed container for maximum quality

Having these maps and blueprints in our collection is very important, as it helps us understand the changes to the city which DigitalNC calls home. To see more from the Chapel Hill Historical Society, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.


Durham United Fund Scrapbooks Online Now

A batch of scrapbooks documenting Durham’s United Fund Campaign are now online at DigitalNC courtesy of our partner Durham County Library. These scrapbooks hold newspaper clippings and advertisements for the United Fund for the years 1953 and 1955 to 1960. Efforts to develop a United Fund for Durham officially began in 1953, so these scrapbooks document the early days of the fund and its subsequent growth.

United Fund Story

The United Fund Story from the 1953 United Fund Scrapbook.

The United Fund joined the campaigning efforts of more than 30 Durham community organizations in an effort to lessen the fundraising burden of each and increase the funds raised for all. The scrapbooks detail the ways in which many local businesses and citizens donated to the United Fund. Monies collected went to support organizations like the Girl Scouts, the Red Cross, and to fight diseases such as polio, cancer, tuberculosis, and heart disease.

Give Once For All Advertisement

An advertisement from a local newspaper encouraged citizens to “Give Once For All” for Durham’s United Fund and detailed many of the organizations included. 

Some of the clippings promise that displaying evidence of earlier contribution “provides the basis for immunity from further solicitation” by any of the organizations included in the United Fund.

Give Only Once Clipping

This clipping promises “immunity from further solicitation” once donations were made to The United Fund. 

Others communicate the fund’s urgency in some interesting ways … like by asking if participants will need “victory whistles or crying towels” at the next meeting.

Victory Whistles or Crying Towels Clipping

United Fund contributors were invited to the first annual meeting. 

 

These scrapbooks detail times of considerable change in Durham, and join an already substantial collection from Durham County Library. To access more from Durham County Library, visit their partner page or their website.


More additions to the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection Now Online at DigitalNC

More additions to the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection, provided by our partner, the Durham County Library, are now online at DigitalNC. This collection of funeral programs and obituaries of African American residents of Durham was compiled by R. Kelly Bryant (1917-2015), a historian with an extensive knowledge of Durham, North Carolina.

This collection is arranged alphabetically by the last names of the individuals included. Names included in the newest addition cover the surnames Raines through Sykes. The funeral programs are an excellent source for genealogical research, and often include details such as birth and death dates, names of family members, locations lived, and parts of an individual’s life story. We are always in the process of digitizing this collection, so please check back for more entries in the coming months.

To take a look at what we have digitized so far from the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection, please visit the collection’s exhibit page. Information about the collection is also available in the finding aid on Durham County Library’s website.

To see more materials from Durham County Library, visit their DigitalNC partner page, or take a look at their website.


More issues of The Charlotte Post are now online!

Charlotte Post, June 24, 1993

Charlotte Post, June 24, 1993

More than two dozen additional issues of The Charlotte Post have recently been added to Digital NC. Thanks to our partnership with Johnson C. Smith University, our digital holdings for The Charlotte Post now mostly range in date from 1971 to 1996, and feature newly uncovered early issues from the 1930s. This most recent batch includes those special issues as well as additions from 1991 to 1996.

The three partial issues are from 1930, 1931, and 1934, and serve as important resources for African American history in Charlotte at that time. The issues cover acts of celebration, violence, and everything between. “The paper with a heart and a soul” and “the voice of the people” shares news of local communities, as well as some national and international news. Though there are only three issues, they share a snapshot of the time, depicting the thoughts and concerns of their audience.

Headlines from the 1930s issues of the Charlotte Post

Headlines from the 1930s issues of the Charlotte Post

Charlotte Post sports advertisement, January 18, 1996

Charlotte Post sports advertisement, January 18, 1996

Issues of The Charlotte Post from the 1990s show regular coverage of topics such as religion, arts and entertainment, lifestyles, business, and sports. Several issues include inserts on various subjects, including grocery sales, but also on automobiles and beauty products.

African Americans on Wheels, Winter 1996

African Americans on Wheels, Winter 1996

The Beauty of Feeling and Looking Good, Spring 1996

The Beauty of Feeling and Looking Good, Spring 1996

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To view all digitized issues of The Charlotte Post, click here. For more information about Johnson C. Smith University, visit their website or their DigitalNC partner page.


New issue of the Goldsboro Hi News now online at DigitalNC

Goldsboro Hi News November 11, 1927

Front Page of the Goldsboro Hi New from November 15, 1927

A new issue of the Goldsboro Hi News from Goldsboro High School in Wayne County is now online at DigitalNC. The issue dates from November 15, 1927 and details the regular goings-on at Goldsboro High School. It includes news about school clubs and organizations, teachers, contests, events, opinions, and much more. The issue is a valuable addition to the already substantial collection of Goldsboro Hi News issues available at DigitalNC.

This issue of Goldsboro Hi News is held by UNC Libraries as part of the North Carolina Collection. Click here to learn more about the other UNC materials hosted online at DigitalNC.


How DigitalNC materials are being used across the web: Tornado Talk

We love hearing about ways that materials digitized through the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center have impacted research and recreation.  We thought since they have done such a great job highlighting us, it’d only be fair to turn around and highlight a few we’ve found recently.  

Photograph of damage from a tornado in Vaughn, NC

From the front page of the October 9, 1969 issue of the Warren Record

Today we’re focusing on a website that is on a very relevant topic to North Carolinians this time of year – the weather, and specifically, tornadoes.  It’s called Tornado Talk and according to the site itself, “Tornado Talk aims to be your #1 source for tornado history. Join us on this on-going project to compile a user friendly and interactive database with tornado summaries, personal accounts, and video productions of major tornado events.”  It is an incredibly in depth website and includes a calendar with tornado dates and each tornado that is focused on includes information about it’s path and links to primary sources about the destruction.  DigitalNC was featured in a recent post about a tornado that hit Vaughan, NC near Lake Gaston on October 2, 1969 and a paper we digitized, the Warren Record, featured articles about the destruction that followed in the tornado’s path.  To read more about the tornado and see the pages from the paper featured, check out Tornado Talk’s post here:

Vaughan-Lake Gaston, NC F2 Tornado – October 2, 1969

If you have a particular project or know of one that has utilized materials from DigitalNC, we’d love to hear about it!  Contact us via email or in the comments below and we’ll check out.  

 


More issues of the Greensboro High School student newspaper are available on DigitalNC

Thanks to our partner, the Greensboro History Museum, additional issues of the student newspaper from Greensboro High School, High Life, are now available on DigitalNC. Newly available issues cover the years 1923-1926, 1937-1941, 1957, and 1976-1978. The paper features information from the high school, now Grimsley High School, and the surrounding Greensboro community.

As a school newspaper, written by students and for students, High Life focuses on its students’ activities. Seniors are featured each May, and several of these special issues include “Last Will and Testament” sections where those leaving the school “give” things to the freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. For example, “Bill Hancock is to receive Ed McDowell’s dramatic trend,” and “R. D. Apple reluctantly relinquishes his long-held position on the mound to Hampton Shuping.”

Greensboro High School Seniors of 1938, May 31, 1938

Greensboro High School Seniors of 1938, May 31, 1938

The students’ comic traditions continue in some of the articles included throughout the paper.

One student published an account of having the measles:

"Home With Measles or How Did I Get in This Fix?," May 30, 1941

“Home With Measles or How Did I Get in This Fix?,” May 30, 1941

Decades later, an unnamed student announced her addiction to the television network HBO:

"Girl Is HBO Addict," May 25, 1978

“Girl Is HBO Addict,” May 25, 1978

To see more from the Greensboro High School student newspaper, click here. To learn more about the Greensboro History Museum, visit their website or their DigitalNC partner page.

 


3 more scrapbooks from Cleveland County Memorial Library now online at DigitalNC

 

Ezra Bridges Cleveland County Scrapbook

A page from Ezra Bridges’ Cleveland County scrapbook

Ezra Bridges Cleveland County Scrapbook

A page from Ezra Bridges’ Cleveland County scrapbook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A new batch of 3 scrapbooks from the Cleveland County Memorial Library are now online at DigitalNC. The scrapbooks, at least one of which was compiled by longtime Cleveland County educator, Ezra Bridges, document various aspects of life in Shelby, NC and the larger Cleveland County area during the second half of the 20th century. Most of the materials within relate to activities concerning both the public school system and the African American community in Cleveland County. The scrapbooks’ pages hold a wide range of items ranging from newspaper clippings, to correspondence, to funeral programs, to postcards, to photos, and more.

To learn more about our partner, Cleveland County Memorial Library, please visit their DigitalNC partner page or take a look at their website.