Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries tagged "local histories"


Now Live On DigitalNC, Documents on Historic Homes from our New Partner, the Perquimans County Restoration Association!

DigitalNC is excited to announce that our new partner the Perquimans County Restoration Association has contributed a collection of materials on historic homes located in their communities. The collection of newspaper clippings, correspondence from the PCRA, and brochures that include tour maps cover various years between 1990 and 2010. Featured in documents throughout the collection are pictures and descriptions of the historic homes that communicate the extraordinary stories behind these living spaces.

 

brochure

Historic Homes Brochure, 2006.

brochure

Histories of homes built in the 18th and 19th-century.

map

Tour Map.

This collection is perfect for people interested in architecture dating back to the 18th century and the histories associated with these beautiful North Carolina homes. One may be tempted to take a trip to Perquimans County to explore the area firsthand after viewing this collection. But before you make travel plans, start your journey to the historical homes of Perquimans here. And to learn more about the Perquimans County Restoration Association visit their contributor page.

 


Goldsboro and Wayne County promotional materials and more yearbooks now on DigitalNC

Thanks to our partner Wayne County Public Library, we have added several items covering Goldsboro and Wayne County history to DigitalNC this past fall.  Promotional items encouraging folks to “Come to Goldsboro” published by the Chamber of Commerce and city itself in the 1910s are included, as are a yearbook and history of the First Presbyterian Church, city ordinances from 1885 and speeches given by prominent citizens of the town.  

Cover of a booklet that says "Come to Goldsboro"

Booklet published by the Goldsboro Chamber of Commerce encouraging business in the city in 1913

We also now have yearbooks online from local Wayne County High Schools spanning the period of 1959-1968. The yearbooks are from Central High School, New Hope High School, Charles B. Aycock High School, and Dillard High School.

The cover of the 1960 issue of Nohosca, the yearbook for New Hope High School in Goldsboro, N.C.

For more information about the Wayne County Public Library, visit their website.


Course Catalogs from Coastal Carolina Community College Now Available

Thanks to our new partner, Coastal Carolina Community College, course catalogs from the college for the period of 1967-2008 are available on DigitalNC. This batch also includes course catalogs from Onslow Technical Insitute, which later became Coastal Carolina Community College.

The cover for the course catalog for Coastal Carolina Community College from the 1990-1991 academic year.

The school, located in Jacksonville, North Carolina, started as the Onslow Industrial Education Center in 1965 and was renamed the Onslow Technical Institute in 1967. In 1970, the school was granted status as a community college. It was then renamed Coastal Carolina Community College, as it is known today.

The cover of the course catalog for Onslow Technical Institute for the 1967-1968 academic year.

For more information about Coastal Carolina Community College, visit their website.


New materials from Rockingham and Stokes Counties are now online!

New materials from the Rockingham County Public Library are now available on DigitalNC. This batch includes photographs, remembrance books, neighborhood histories, newspaper clippings, and a football schedule poster.

Photographs include the one above of Lowes Methodist Church, now Lowes United Methodist, in Reidsville, and one of Charlie Jackson Bennett laying in state in 1953. There are remembrance books for the same Bennett, as well as Carrie Lee H. Bennett and Sylvia Bennett Brown. The funeral home where Sylvia Bennett Brown was laid to rest also created a remembrance plaque, included in this batch of items.

Other items include a variety of materials documenting the history of Mayodan and Stoneville, North Carolina, mostly from the twentieth century. The Carolina Heights neighborhood in Eden, North Carolina, is also represented here by a leaflet sharing its history. Carolina Heights was formerly in Spray, which was consolidated into Eden in 1967. To see all materials on DigitalNC from Spray, click here.

DigitalNC is thankful to our partner, Rockingham County Public Library, for enabling access to these materials online. To learn more about the Rockingham County Public Library, visit their partner page here or their website here. To see all items in this batch, click here, and to see everything contributed by the library, click here.


Church Minutes And History From New Bern First Baptist Church Online Now!

Thanks to our partner, the New Bern-Craven County Public Library, we have now uploaded several books of church minutes from the First Baptist Church of New Bern, as well as a book from 1984 on the history of the congregation.

Cover for “‘In The Beginning—Baptists’!: History of the First Baptist Church, New Bern, North Carolina 1809-1984” by Edna Avery Cook.

The First Baptist Church of New Bern was founded on May 11, 1809 after numerous unsuccessful attempts to form a Baptist church on the site since before the American Revolutionary War. On July 2, 1848 the sanctuary–a gothic revival structure that still stands today–was dedicated. The structure was left mostly unharmed during the Civil War, except for an indent from a cannonball from the Battle of New Bern that was visible until renovations were completed in 1975.

Cover of the book of minutes for the First Baptist Church of New Bern from December 3, 1870-January 1, 1883.

 

For more about the New-Bern Craven County Public Library, visit their website.


Mitchell Community College Catalogs and Historic Ephemera Available Now!

Thanks to our partner, Mitchell Community College, we now have a new batch of catalogs, presidential reports, event programs and other ephemera spanning the years 1943-2011.

A brochure for Mitchell College and Academy from June 1934.

Mitchell Community College began as Concord Presbyterian Female College, chartered in 1852 in downtown Statesville, North Carolina. In 1917, its name was changed to Mitchell College and in 1924 it became a junior women’s college. However, because the Great Depression brought fewer opportunities for local men to receive a college education, Mitchell College became co-educational in 1932. In 1973, Mitchell College was incorporated into the North Carolina Community College System and became known as it is known today as Mitchell Community College. They now have two locations: one in Statesville and one in Mooresville, North Carolina.

A 1990 program for the Miss Mitchell Pageant, an annual pageant that was held at Mitchell Community College.

You can view all of the materials we’ve digitized for Mitchell Community College on their contributor page. For more information about this partner, check out their website.


Materials dating back to 1876 now online from Union County Public Library

In a new batch of items from partner Union County Public Library, which they digitized themselves, there are materials that date all the way back to 1876.  A catalog for Monroe High School from 1876 details all the classes one could take at the school, which was a white, private, co-educational school that advertised not only to those who lived in Monroe, but in the surrounding area, including South Carolina.  In the first section of the book it lists the enrollment at the school and hometowns of each student.  The cost for 20 weeks at the school was $10-$16 tuition plus $50 for room and board.  page listing the students enrolled at Monroe High School

Other materials from this batch include several Chamber of Commerce publications promoting Monroe, NC, a feature on the new library in Monroe, and the minutes of the Union County Medical Association from 1902 to 1922.  The Medical Association minutes are particularly interesting in mentioning about a black doctor, Dr. J.S. Massey, being a member in 1903 in what was otherwise an all white organization.  This would have been during a time of increasing segregation and aggression by whites against black in North Carolina following the Plessy vs. Ferguson decision and the 1898 race riots in Wilmington and the shift in the government in 1900 to a white supremacist Democratic leadership. 

There is also a yearbook from 1954 from Union High School that was located in Lanes Creek Township.  

To view more materials from Union County Public Library, visit their partner page.  


Additional Photographs Showcasing Edgecombe County’s Historic Architecture Online Now

A newly digitized batch of photographs of historic homes and structures in Edgecombe County has been added to our website, courtesy of our partner, the Edgecombe County Memorial Library. Follow this link see the previously published batch of photos and this link to see the blog post about the previous batch of photographs.

One of the houses exhibited in these photographs is the Hart House, built by William A. Hart, a well-known Edgecombe County businessman and farmer, in 1909. This home is a rare example of a columned house in the Neo-Classical style in Tarboro.

The M. A. Hart House, located at 1109 Main St. in Tarboro, N.C.

Another house that can be seen in the batch of photographs is the J. J. Green House. This two-story home with its blend of Queen Anne and Neo-Classical architectural themes was built around 1900 by Rocky Mount architect John C. Stout, the cashier of the Bank of Tarboro.

A photograph of the J. J. Green House, located at 800 Main St. in Tarboro, N.C.

For more about the Edgecombe County Memorial Library, visit their partner page or check out their website.


Several Wayne County Boy’s Club Scrapbooks are now live!

Several scrapbooks from the Wayne County Boy’s Club have been added to our website, courtesy of our partner the Wayne County Public Library. These scrapbooks include histories of the club, photos, newspaper clippings, and other memorabilia from or related to the Wayne County Boy’s Club. They roughly span the years of 1946-1980.  The scrapbook from 1974-1975 focuses on the integration of the Boys Club in Goldsboro, when the EA House and Paley units of the club combined.  

The cover of the Boy’s Club Scrapbook containing materials from the period between 1946-1959.

In addition to these scrapbooks, this batch also includes the program from the Eastern North Carolina Drama Festival, which was held at Goldsboro High School on March 27-29, 1947.

For more information on the Wayne County Public Library, please visit their website.


New Editions of The Grier Script, Gastonia High School Newspaper, Now Online!

Thanks to our partner, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, new editions of The Grier Script are now on DigitalNC. These are a recent acquisition by the North Carolina Collection Gallery as part of the Lew Powell Collection. The Grier Script was the student newspaper of the W.P. Grier Jr. High School in Gastonia. The available issues span the years 1968-1972 and the year 1981.

The cover of the Volume III, No. 2 issue of the Grier Script, from December 1, 1969.

The Grier Script reported the events and news stories from the school for its students and staff.

The cover of the Volume XVI, No. 3 issue of the Grier Script, from April 1, 1972.

 

For more information about the North Carolina Collection, visit the North Carolina Collection website. You can also see other materials we’ve digitized for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on their contributor page. On their own digital collections page you can also view a selection of items from the Lew Powell collection.