Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries tagged "memorabilia"


Agricultural Photographs from the Historical Association of Catawba County

farming

Laborers threshing wheat on the Carpenter farm

Agriculture is the theme of our latest digitized collection. Our partner the Historical Association of Catawba County provided photographs from the 1920’s through the 1950’s that show farm workers, mills, and the cultivation of crops from that era. There are also pictures of farm equipment and farm animals such as horses, mules, and cows. And if you have ever wondered how farmers threshed wheat, there are a few photographs that will show you how its done. Other photographs include farmers proudly displaying their crops and farm animals. While the majority of photographs were taken in Catawba county, there are pictures from other counties throughout North Carolina. To see all of the photographs in this collection click here.

 

agriculture

A man, a police officer, and two large watermelons.


Mid-Century Newspaper Clippings Now On DigitalNC Courtesy of Partner Duplin County Library

black and white photo of wood and metal building debris

A photo showing damage to a tobacco warehouse in Wallace, North Carolina after Hurricane Hazel

A new batch of newspaper clippings and articles that tell the story of Duplin County are now available on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Duplin County Library. This is the first material of its kind that they have donated and we are privileged to have it.

black and white newspaper clipping of four individuals sawing through a tree trunk

A 1951 photo of Duplin County Rev. L.C. Prater sawing timber that would go to rebuilding the local Universalist Church.

Included in this collection are clippings from the Duplin Times from 1949-1962, clippings from the Raleigh News & Observer from 1950-1965, and clippings from the Wallace Enterprise from 1953-1964. Many of these assorted clippings focus on Duplin County activities, highlighting important figures of the community, the goings-on at local schools, and what regular people were doing in Duplin County in the middle of the 20th century. There are other articles included here, as well. One of the articles from the Duplin Times also includes a transcribed letter from General Sherman in March 1865, and the clippings from the Raleigh News & Observer include profiles about the life of Dr. John Atkinson Ferrell, a doctor who fought the spread of hookworm in North Carolina.

This is the first material of its kind from the Duplin County Library, and it is a valuable addition to DigitalNC. To learn more from the Duplin County Library, please take a look at their partner page or visit their website.


NCDHC Welcomes Our 250th Partner, The Dudley Alumni Association!

 

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Members of the Graduating Class of 1949

DigitalNC is proud to announce the Dudley Alumni Association as its 250th partner. The Dudley Alumni Association provided us with yearbooks, photographs, student newspapers, and newspaper clippings related to educators in Greensboro, N.C. As an alumni of James B. Dudley High School with family ties that include my father, sister, aunt, great uncle, and other family members I am overjoyed to have such an intimate connection to this contribution to the DigitalNC website.

Included in the collection are yearbooks from 1957 and the years 1966-1969. I had the personal pleasure of viewing yearbooks that cover my father’s entire time at Dudley, 1967-1969. There are also photos of students and administrators in the classroom, and students on the campus yard, as well as images of the graduating classes of 1949, 1953, and 1959 in their caps and gowns.

yearbook cover

1969 Dudley High School Yearbook

yearbook page

Graduates from the Class of ’69

 

The historic James B. Dudley High School is an intricate part of the legacy of Greensboro, N.C. and now other alumni, community members, and people who want to be reminded of, or are curious about, what Panther Pride looks like can view items that frame this historically Black high school.

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Students and Administrators


Massey Hill Heritage Discovery Project Materials Tell The Story of One Fayetteville Neighborhood

A partial map of the Mill Villages found in Massey Hill.

Over 120 new photos, news clippings, artifacts, and oral interviews have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of the Arts Council of Fayetteville, as part of the Massey Hill Heritage Discovery Project. This project was designed to trace the history of the Massey Hill neighborhood in Fayetteville dating back into the 19th century. Located between Camden Road and Gillespie Street along Southern Avenue, Massey Hill is a neighborhood that grew up alongside the three local textile mills and inspired feelings of family and community among its long-time residents, many of whom lived their whole lives in Massey Hill.

Exterior photo of the Massey Hill Hardware Store

A photo of the Tolar-Hart Mill Water Tower in Fayetteville.

 

There is a ton of variety in this batch, giving us a vibrant image of what it was like to live and grow up in Massey Hill. Dozens of photos are included, with many highlighting life in the mills, events and celebrations that were held for holidays, and pictures of local schools and schoolchildren. A number of newspaper clippings are also found in this batch, detailing many different parts of life in Massey Hill, including interviews with local residents. One resident, Ida Belle Dallas Parker, also wrote several short stories reminiscing on her childhood and family history in Massey Hill. Finally, a number of oral histories from Massey Hill residents are included – they also discuss their personal histories growing up in Massey Hill, how they feel about the neighborhood, and what it meant to them.

Having these materials on DigitalNC is an important reminder of how we build communities in our lives and what they mean to the people who live there. To browse through other materials from the Arts Council of Fayetteville, check out their partner page or take a look at their website.


W.S. Clark Store Accounting Ledgers Now Online at DigitalNC

ledger page for Mrs. Judge Howard with products and prices

A snapshot from the 1899 Millinery Book Ledger

A new batch of materials from Edgecombe Community College in Tarboro, North Carolina is now online and available on DigitalNC. This collection contains several accounting ledgers from the late 19th century. These five account books are all from the W.S. Clark Store in Tarboro. The store, started by William Samuel Clark (1846-1923), was operated in Tarboro from the 1870s through the 1980s as a general store. By the 1950s, it operated as a department store that sold everything from furniture to clothing to groceries. It was continued for over 50 years after Clark died by his sons.

These ledgers were donated to Edgecombe Community College by his grandson, Clark Jenkins, and then they found their way to DigitalNC. They contain transactions of the wide variety of goods that people purchased, as well as the prices of various items, and indicate when customers made payments on their accounts. For example, in 1896, a pair of slippers cost $1.35 and a straw hat cost 15 cents.

Follow the links below to browse the items included in this batch:

To learn more from the Edgecombe Community College, click here to visit their partner page or click here to visit their website.

 


New Partner Clemmons Historical Society Now On DigitalNC

We are excited to welcome new partner Clemmons Historical Society to DigitalNC.

The first set of materials from them is a big batch that documents the history of Clemmons. The Clemmons Historical Society provided numerous pieces of correspondence, pictures, scrapbooks, and yearbooks. Can you read German? Checkout the “Bethlehem Diary Excerpts” from the late 1700’s. Stagecoach enthusiasts can view pictures of the “Hattie Butner Stagecoach” as it appeared post-restoration in 1994. If you want to see what teenage life was like in Clemmons in the 1940’s & 50’s take a look at a collection of yearbooks from that era. There are many more documents and pictures that help to frame the long history of Clemmons and you can find them all here

dark green scrapbook cover that says Clemmons 1953

Clemmons Scrapbook from 1953

 

Black and white drawing of a Hattie Butner Stagecoach, with "clemmons, North Carolina" beneath

Drawing of Hattie Butner Stagecoach on a Fund Raising Note Card

To learn more about our new partner, please visit their partner page or their website for more information.


Newly Digitized Materials from Winston Salem’s African-American Community Now Online

 

Vacation Bible School Group Photo

A group photograph taken at Shiloh Baptist Church’s Vacation Bible School. June 1958.

We have added materials that capture some of Winston Salem’s rich African-American history from 1930 to 1990, courtesy of the Winston Salem African American Archive.

Included in this batch are several editions of The Columbian, the student newspaper for Columbian Heights High School, and articles from other local papers highlighting notable community members and events.

One such community member, Joseph Bradshaw was a veteran, social worker, educator and local historian, committed to preserving Black history in the city and beyond. Other articles detail firsts in Winston Salem’s African-American community: William Samel Scales opened the first black-owned bonding agency and later served as the president of Forsyth Savings and Trust. Naomi McLean opened the first black business and stenographer school in Winston Salem. Carl Matthews began the Winston-Salem sit-in on February 8, 1960. Other articles detail the 1947 Local 22 Tobacco Workers strike at the R.J. Reynolds Factory.

Color portraits of Mary Hairston and Dr. Rufus Hairston

Color portraits of Mrs. Mary Hairston and Dr. Rufus S. Hairston. Dr. Hairston was Winston Salem’s first African-American pharmacist.

Also included in these materials are color portraits of Dr. and Mrs. Rufus S. Hairston and a scrapbook of materials collected by Mrs. Hairston. The Hairstons were both alumni of Slater Industrial Academy, now known as Winston Salem State University, and active members of their community. Dr. Hairston was Winston Salem’s first African-American pharmacist, an alumnus of Shaw University, president of the National Pharmaceutical Association, and was appointed WSSU’s first alumni board of trustee member. Mrs. Hairston served as one of the first presidents of the Winston Salem Chapter of Moles, a national professional organization of women of color, and was a founding member of the Winston Salem Chapter of The Links, Inc. She was also involved in the development of Winston Salem’s first library for African-Americans and later worked in the WSSU library.

To learn more about the Winston Salem African American Archive, visit their website or partner page.


New items from the Grand Lodge of North Carolina now online at DigitalNC

Chorazin Chapter Royal Arch Masons 1914

A page from the Book of Marks of the Chorazin Chapter no. 13 of the Royal Arch Masons of Greensboro, NC, 1914

A new batch of items from The Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of North Carolina are now available online. The recently digitized materials consist largely of minute books, account ledgers, and membership rolls from the Grand Lodge and various other Masonic lodges in North Carolina. Also included is a selection of twentieth-century scrapbooks, bylaws, historical sketches, and programs from several different lodges. The textual materials originate mainly from lodges  in the Raleigh and Greensboro areas and date from the early 19th century to the 1960s.

 

Colonial Masters Royal White Hart Lodge

Officers of the Order of Colonial Masters at the Royal White Hart Lodge no. 2, 1911

Accompanying the textual materials are two groups of photographs, the first detailing various activities and features of the the Royal White Hart Lodge No. 2 of Halifax, NC in 1911. The second group of photographs documents a ball held on April 18, 1962 which celebrated the installation of Charles Carpenter Ricker as Grand Master of Phoenix Lodge No. 2 in Raleigh, NC. A single photo, taken circa. 1915, which details a gathering of Oasis Shriners in Charlotte, NC, accompanies the two larger sets.

To see more materials from The Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of North Carolina, visit their partner page or take a look at their website.


New school records from Central Piedmont Community College now online at DigitalNC

 

Mecklenburg College

Mecklenburg College master plan, circa 1961-1963

A new batch of materials from Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) is now available online. The documents, stored in vertical files at CPCC’s archives, consist of school administrative documents and yearbooks from the 1950s and 1960s. The materials document the operation and administration of the predominantly black Carver College (later renamed Mecklenburg College) and the Central Industrial Education Center before their merger to form CPCC in 1963. The batch contains the entirety of both the Carver College Collection and the Central Industrial Education Center Collection from CPCC’s archives. For detailed finding aids on either collection, please follow the links.

The new materials are an addition to the CPCC memorabilia and yearbooks already hosted online at DigitalNC. Please visit their partner page or website for more information.


Cary, NC historical materials from the Page-Walker Arts & History Center now online at DigitalNC

Cary 1970s

Heading east on Chatham St. in downtown Cary (Rexall, now Ashworth, Drugs on the right), 1970s

A new batch of materials from the Page-Walker Arts & History Center is now online at DigitalNC. The batch consists of research notes compiled by author Thomas M. Byrd for his 1994 book, Around and About Cary, which describes the history of Cary, NC. The notes include pages of draft edits, copies of primary and secondary sources, correspondence, census information, and various planning documents. Byrd’s notes are a great resource for those interested in the history of Cary or, more generally, the planning and composition of local history works and the overall growth of the Wake County and Triangle area of North Carolina.  

Byrd’s notes are another addition to the existing Page-Walker Arts & History Center materials hosted online at DigitalNC. Please visit their website or DigitalNC partner page for more information.