Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries tagged "photos"


More Materials from Johnston Community College are now Available

Aerial Photograph, 1983

Aerial Photograph, 1983

Thanks to our partners at Johnston Community College, DigitalNC is proud to make more photographs, a scrapbook and a 1988 class schedule available online. This batch follows a previous set of about 750 photographs from the college, and continues along themes of education, community, and the campuses in Smithfield and Four Oaks.

Some of the most notable photos are of campus personalities, including Dr. A. Curtis Phillips, President Donald Reichard, other faculty and staff, and several that focus on President John Tart as he was about to retire.

John Tart, his wife Marjorie Tart, and their grandchildren at President Tart's retirement party, 1998

John Tart, his wife Marjorie Tart, and their grandchildren pose by a series of cakes meant to look like the Johnston Community College at President Tart’s retirement party, 1998

The batch also includes the first scrapbook of news clippings produced by Johnston Community College. This book, filled with clippings from 1969 to 1972, is the first of many scrapbooks assembled by College faculty and staff. This book documents the origins and early days of the school, which opened as Johnston County Technical Institute in Fall 1969.

First class of curriculum students, September 1971 clipping in the 1969-1972 scrapbook

First class of curriculum students, September 1971 clipping in the 1969-1972 scrapbook

To see all of the photographs on DigitalNC from Johnston Community College, click here. DigitalNC also hosts several yearbooks from Johnston Community College from this time period–click here to view them. To learn more about Johnston Community College, visit their partner page here or their website here.


Cleveland County Memorial Library Collection of Materials from the Black Community is Now Live on DigitalNC!

DigitalNC partner Cleveland County Memorial Library provided us with a rich collection of documents, photographs, and yearbooks related to the history of Black citizens in the area. Much of the collection focuses on Black schools that were established during the era of Jim Crow and segregation. These schools were created out of necessity but did not survive integration, leaving their history vulnerable. Fortunately people like Ezra A. Bridges, a longtime educator and community activist, made it a priority to preserve items related to the Black experience in Cleveland County.

 

booklet

Biographical Information on Ezra A. Bridges.

newspaper clipping

Ezra A. Bridges at groundbreaking.

A few highlights from the collection are the yearbooks, various histories of schools in the area, and photographs of students and educators. There is a lot more in this important collection of materials that stress and celebrate Black citizens of Cleveland County and their relentless pursuit of education and proper representation. To see more from Cleveland County Memorial Library visit their contributor page.

Photo

Educator and her students.


Photographs from the North Carolina Community College Adult Educators Association Now Available!

Thanks to our partner, Randolph Community College, we now have photographs from the North Carolina Community College Adult Educators Association (NCCCAEA) available online along with issues of the Association’s newsletter. The photos span the years 1969-2001 and primarily capture moments from various conferences and banquets featuring members of the association. 

The NCCCAEA was formed in 1965 as the Community College Adult Educators of North Carolina. Membership is available for instructors, administrators, and support staff employed by the North Carolina Community College System.

Banner from the 1995 NCCCAEA Fall Conference.

For more information about Randolph Community College, visit their website.


Photographs from Johnston Community College are now available on DigitalNC

Electronic welcome sign, Johnston Community College, 1985

Electronic welcome sign, Johnston Community College, 1985

Approximately 750 photographs from Johnston Community College have recently been digitized and added to the website, thanks to our partnership with the school. Mostly from the 1970s and 1980s, the photographs include images of campus, students, and staff at the main Smithfield campus as well as the Four Oaks Howell Woods campus.

The photographs in this collection are diverse in subject matter, comprising everything from photos of the College’s first president, John Tart, to the College’s Truck Driver Training program, to photos of various buildings on campus throughout stages of their construction and renovation.

One of the most unique collections in this batch is the almost completely reproduced set of photos from the 1989 yearbook. This is particularly useful as it provides original colored photographs to compare against the black and white yearbook.

Marshall Casey, Carole Lawerence, Angela Batts, and Becky Turnage, from the staff of the 1989 Retrospect Yearbook

Marshall Casey, Carole Lawerence, Angela Batts, and Becky Turnage, from the staff of the 1989 Retrospect Yearbook

To see all of the photographs in this batch, click here. DigitalNC also hosts several yearbooks from Johnston Community College from this time period–click here to view them. To learn more about Johnston Community College, visit their partner page here or their website here.


Additional Photographs Showcasing Edgecombe County’s Historic Architecture Online Now

A newly digitized batch of photographs of historic homes and structures in Edgecombe County has been added to our website, courtesy of our partner, the Edgecombe County Memorial Library. Follow this link see the previously published batch of photos and this link to see the blog post about the previous batch of photographs.

One of the houses exhibited in these photographs is the Hart House, built by William A. Hart, a well-known Edgecombe County businessman and farmer, in 1909. This home is a rare example of a columned house in the Neo-Classical style in Tarboro.

The M. A. Hart House, located at 1109 Main St. in Tarboro, N.C.

Another house that can be seen in the batch of photographs is the J. J. Green House. This two-story home with its blend of Queen Anne and Neo-Classical architectural themes was built around 1900 by Rocky Mount architect John C. Stout, the cashier of the Bank of Tarboro.

A photograph of the J. J. Green House, located at 800 Main St. in Tarboro, N.C.

For more about the Edgecombe County Memorial Library, visit their partner page or check out their website.


Images of Alamance County from the late nineteenth to early twentieth century are available now!

Main Street, Burlington, 1908

Main Street, Burlington, 1908

Over 100 new images of Alamance County are available on DigitalNC, thanks to our partners at Alamance County Public Libraries. The collection of photographs and postcards was compiled by Don Bolden, author of several books about Alamance County. They document various towns including Burlington, Alamance, Graham, Saxapahaw, Elon, Gibsonville, Mebane, and Whitsett.

The images range in date from around 1880 to 1936. Many focus on the communities’ rich industrial heritage, though other subjects shown include education, local businesses, and railroads, even a parade to celebrate the end of World War I. The town made a replica of L’Arc de Triomphe for the occasion, shown below.

The batch also includes images of several local mills, such as Elmira Cotton Mill, May Hosiery Mill, Aurora Cotton Mills, Whitehead Hosiery Mills, Daisy Hosiery Mill, and others.

Additionally, there are several photos of the Whitsett Institute, a co-ed school in Whitsett, North Carolina. Image subjects include students, teachers, the baseball team, the orchestra, and others.

To see all of the photos and postcards in this batch, click here. To learn more about the Alamance County Public Libraries, visit their partner page here, or their website here. To browse Don Bolden’s publications, click here.


How North Carolinians reacted to the Apollo 11 moon landing in 1969

50 years ago on July 19, 1969 , the Apollo 11 entered lunar orbit and hours later on July 20, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed the lunar module the Eagle on the surface of the moon.  It was there Armstrong famously said “One small step for man, one giant step for mankind.” The moon landing was watched with bated breath by the entire nation, which had been engaged throughout the 1960s in an intense “space race” with the Soviet Union during the height of the Cold War.  The landing also fulfilled the promise President John F. Kennedy had made in a famous speech in 1962 that before the decade was out, America would go to the moon. 

Many resources on DigitalNC show how North Carolinians celebrated the moon landing and how they viewed it in relation to the space race.

black and white photograph of the moon above a poem

Poem written by the editor of the New Bern Mirror commemorating the moon landing

    

The front page of the New Bern Mirror published the Friday after the landing described how many of New Bern’s citizens were glued to their televisions to watch the grainy footage come back to Earth of Aldrin and Armstrong, starting off with “Like us, you’ll find it hard to believe, but there were New Bernians who didn’t have their television sets turned on Sunday afternoon and night.” and later referring to the event as the biggest thing since “Christ rose from the dead.”  The front page spread  also included a poem by the editor of the paper about the landing. 

cartoon of a man sitting at a desk and a short column about pride in the moon landing

Frank Count, a well known local columnist for the Franklin Times’ take on the moon landing.

The Franklin Times had a full page spread about the landing in their July 22, 1969 issue, pulling in not only national press materials but also including a short Frank Count column stating “Me and them…we’re mighty proud of the Ask-her-naughts and we’re mighty proud to be Americans.”  

Headline reading "Our Old Problems Remain Despite the Hope of Apollo"

Headline from the Carolina Times published after the moon landing.

Some publications took a slightly different tone; while being inspired by the scientific feat of getting to the moon, the Carolina Times, the African-American paper in Durham, noted that while it was great the United States got to the moon, on Earth there were still wars being fought, people in extreme poverty, and many other unresolved problems.  The editor closed the editorial wishing for Americans to be inspired to think differently and broader now that they knew they could reach the moon. “The moon landing undoubtedly dramatized the rapidity of change in the world and may therefore encourage new approaches, new attitudes, and new policies toward contemporary problems. In a way, this great achievement focused the mind of the entire race on a single event and said to the world what Lincoln said to the American people in 1862. ‘As our case is new, we must think anew and act anew. We must dis-enthrall ourselves and then we shall save our country.'”

Photograph of astronaut's footprint on the surface of the moon

Introduction of the 1970 Junius Rose High School yearbook.

Showing the landing still had an impact a year later, a 1970 yearbook from Junius Rose High School in Greenville, NC compared the graduates of Rose High School to the astronauts who landed on the moon and commented on their next move to make “a giant leap” into adulthood as they leave high school behind.

This is just a small sampling of the many reactions in the newspapers in communities across the state, as well as other materials on our site related to interest in the space race and Cold War, which you can look at here.  The overwhelming feeling from almost all of them is a strong pride in being American and thus a part of this great scientific achievement and a sense that now anything was possible for the country.  


Agricultural Photographs from the Historical Association of Catawba County

farming

Laborers threshing wheat on the Carpenter farm

Agriculture is the theme of our latest digitized collection. Our partner the Historical Association of Catawba County provided photographs from the 1920’s through the 1950’s that show farm workers, mills, and the cultivation of crops from that era. There are also pictures of farm equipment and farm animals such as horses, mules, and cows. And if you have ever wondered how farmers threshed wheat, there are a few photographs that will show you how its done. Other photographs include farmers proudly displaying their crops and farm animals. While the majority of photographs were taken in Catawba county, there are pictures from other counties throughout North Carolina. To see all of the photographs in this collection click here.

 

agriculture

A man, a police officer, and two large watermelons.


Newly Digitized Photos Reveal the Historic Architecture of Edgecombe County

Hundreds of photographs, documents, and other materials have been newly digitized at DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Edgecombe County Memorial Library. This batch covers over a hundred historic homes and buildings throughout Edgecombe County and Tarboro.

An undated photo of The Barracks, a historic 19th century home in Edgecombe County.

Encompassing over a hundred locations dating from the 18th to the 20th century, this batch highlights many of the historic homes, buildings, bridges, and more found throughout Edgecombe County. Every folder found within this batch contains something different about a different house, and includes a depth of knowledge about Edgecombe County history hardly found elsewhere. For example, one folder photographs of and information about the Whitney Bridgers House that highlights its architecture style from several angles and history.

An undated postcard photo of Bracebridge Hall, known for its “architectural excellence”

Many of the other folders contain other documentation and detail topics like the specific house’s ownership history. For example, the folder for the Bynum-Sugg House has material relating to its historic preservation and need for restoration in the late 20th century. The folder for the famous Bracebridge Hall highlights how it was the 19th century home for North Carolina Governor Elias Carr in Edgecombe County, including information about its construction, design, and the stories behind certain specific rooms. Many of the folders in this batch contain both black-and-white and color photographs of the houses, as well as interior and exterior shots.

A photo of the historic marker at Peacocks Bridge in Stantonsburg, N.C.

This batch also contains photos, materials and information about other important locations besides just homes, too. A few postcards are included, like a 1909 postcard of the Baptist Church in Wilson, North Carolina. Other assorted photos are included, such as a photo of the 8th grade class from Charles L. Coon High School in 1923. There is also a photo of the historic marker placed beside Peacocks Bridge in Stantonsburg, North Carolina, as well as a brief history of its importance.

This batch introduces a wealth of knowledge about historic homes and important places in Edgecombe County, and is invaluable to our collection. To see more from the Edgecombe County Memorial Library, visit their partner page or check out their website.


Nearly 250 More Photos from Central Carolina Community College Now Online

Aerial view of the Hockaday Hall building, dated 2001.

A new batch of photos from Central Carolina Community College is now available on DigitalNC. This is our tenth batch of photos from CCCC, and it brings our exhibit A Pictorial History of Central Carolina Community College to over 3,600 photos.

This batch covers a wide variety of subjects. There are photos from the mid-1960s, when CCCC was first called Lee County Industrial Education Center, later to be renamed Central Carolina Technical Institute.  Many of these show the construction of the building. There are photos of the the Hockaday Hall building, housing the Student Center and Administrative offices on the Lee County campus of, at the time, CCTI.

An undated photo of an audience attending a student project fair in the CCCC library.

There are also photos of the CCTI Library on the Lee County campus, as well as photos of diligent students and library staffers. The amount of photos containing students from different fields studying in the library shows how important it is to CCCC students’ success. Some librarians and figureheads in the library are highlighted. Finally, there are also photos of construction of buildings on campus which would later become Wilkinson Hall. These photos date from 1960 to 2009.

To see more from Central Carolina Community College, please visit their partner page or check out their website. To see more photos like these from CCCC, check out the nearly 4,000 photos in the collection A Pictorial History of Central Carolina Community College.