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Additional Issues of the High Life and Greensboro Daily Workman Now Available on DigitalNC

Header for the High Life newspaper. It reads: High Life. Grimsley High School, Greensboro, NC 27410, May 20, 1968.

Thanks to our partner, Greensboro History Museum, a batch containing over 100 additional issues of Grimsley High School’s student newspaper, High Life, as well as nine issues of the Greensboro Daily Workman from the 19th century are now available on our website.

A majority of the High Life issues from this batch are from the 1960s and 1970s. During these years the hippie movement, a movement which featured long hair, advocation of nonviolence and love, as well as folk and rock music, was taking place. Like many parents during this time, one student named Marcia Quigley had a lot to say about individuals, boys in particular, keeping their hair long.

The article begins with Quigley discussing the problems of boys having long hair which include them becoming traffic hazards due to their hair dangling in front of or blowing into their eyes, long hair leading to premature baldness, and denied entry to certain buildings. Quigley then goes on to dramatically assert that boys, simply by allowing their hair to grow out, turn from being “honest, dynamic, [and] all-American” to scroungy, upstart hippies with a reputation as a rat. If attacks on their character and driving abilities weren’t enough, the writer also makes sure to include the possibility of being bullied by fellow students and adults. Quigley’s complaint in the May 20, 1968 issue of High Life can be read in its entirety here on our website.

To learn more about the Greensboro History Museum, please visit their website.

To view more newspapers from across North Carolina, please visit our North Carolina Newspaper Collection.


More Issues of the Greensboro Student Newspaper Added to DigitalNC

Masthead for "High Life".

High Life, October 4, 1957.

A gap in newspaper issues available from Greensboro, N.C. has now been filled thanks to our partners at the Greensboro History Museum. Close to 200 new issues of the Greensboro high school student newspaper, High Life, are ready to view online. These additions fill in years ranging from 1927 to 1958.

The high school cast of the play "Spring Fever" acting out a scene.

Student actors in “Spring Fever”, November 22, 1940.

While High Life published sporadically, normally on every other Friday during the school year, they wrote substantial articles, creating a creditable newspaper that continued year to year. Besides commenting on student life, such as appointments of Homecoming Queens and awarding of senior superlatives, High Life also documented staff appointments, sports headlines, and goings on about town. They also made space for creative endeavors, like drawings and poems.

Select senior photos of the graduating class of 1939 from Greensboro High School. The photographers name is also noted as "Photos by Flynt".

Graduating seniors, High Life, May 26, 1939.

A high school graduate in cap and gown with their mother.

Graduation, May 30, 1958.

To view more materials from the Greensboro History Museum, visit their partner page here. To be taken directly to the Greensboro History Museum web page, click here. To see more newspapers from Digital NC, visit our North Carolina Newspapers collection.


Yearbooks, Early Journals, and More Student Newspapers from Greensboro High School / Grimsley High Now Online

Group of high school students named Senior Superlatives standing outside facing the cameraWe’ve worked with the Greensboro History Museum to add more publications from Greensboro High School (now Grimsley High School) to DigitalNC. Included in this most recent batch are more of the school’s student newspaper, the High Life, from the 1920s-1960s. You’ll also find The Sage, one of the school’s literary publications, with issues from 1910-1918. Finally, there are three additional yearbooks – 1930, 1968, and 1969. Our partner provided this succinct history of the school’s yearbook and other publications:

Greensboro High School’s first annual was published in 1909 and named The Reflector in 1910. To help with the war effort during World War I, the school chose not to publish the yearbook in 1918, saving funds by using the May 1918 edition of its magazine, The Sage, as a smaller, abbreviated version. This continued even after the war, in 1919 and 1920, before publication of The Reflector resumed in 1921. In 1926, 1928, and 1929, there were both January and June editions, a result of adding mid-term graduating classes starting in 1926. By the mid-1920s, because of growing difficulties funding the yearbook, The Reflector‘s content was significantly reduced, and it went from hardcover to paperback in 1926 before publication ceased after 1930.

While the Depression did not fully impact Greensboro Senior High and its other programs until 1933, when a local bond-supplement failed to pass, the already financially strapped yearbook was affected and publication stopped. Despite interest in restarting an annual soon after financial stability for the Greensboro schools was restored in 1936 (via a successful bond vote), Principal A.P. Routh insisted that the yearbook have full and strong financial stability before being resumed, hence it did not occur then. The effort was further delayed a few years later by the significant impact of World War II on school life.

After the war, interest in publishing a yearbook continued to grow. The financial situation was finally stabilized, and the first edition of the newly named Whirligig was published in 1950 (after almost occurring in 1949), ), the yearbook that is still issued each year at Grimsley today. During the 19 years of no annuals (1931-1949), photos of seniors were published on souvenir photo sheets or in the year’s final issue of the school newspaper, High Life.

Click through to view all of the Greensboro / Grimsley High School publications available on DigitalNC.


Over one hundred more issues of the Greensboro High School newspaper are online now

Thanks to our partners at the Greensboro History Museum, DigitalNC is proud to announce more digitized issues of Greensboro High School’s (now Grimsley High School) student newspaper, High LifeThis addition covers 1921 to 1939, which precedes the issues that had already been available from 1940 to 1978.

The paper shares relevant news with GHS students, covering topics such as academics, athletics, social events and clubs, and opinion pieces. Writers frequently share humorous columns to keep things interesting, including this clipping mocking “a Kentuckian at Yale:”

"A Kentuckian at Yale," May 21, 1925

“A Kentuckian at Yale,” May 21, 1925

However, there’s a time and place for serious news as well. The 1922 issues often shared an “Administrative News” section, where Greensboro school administrators shared useful information with students. Here are some sample headlines from this section:

Clipping from "Administrative News," October 20, 1922

Clipping from “Administrative News,” October 20, 1922

To learn more about High Life, and view all of our digitized content from this title, click here. To learn more about the Greensboro History Museum, visit their partner page here or their website here.


Greensboro’s The Daily Workman newspaper is now available on DigitalNC!

The Daily Workman, September 15, 1885

The Daily Workman, September 15, 1885

Six issues of The Daily Workman from 1885 to 1887 are now available on DigitalNC, thanks to our partners at the Greensboro History Museum. The Daily Workman documents local activities and shares news that may interest all locals. Business activities, classified advertisements, and all manner of public notices are included in this paper.

The Daily Workman, June 29, 1887

The Daily Workman, June 29, 1887

Assorted news, September 27, 1886

Assorted news, September 27, 1886

To view all issues of The Daily Workman, click here. To learn more about the Greensboro History Museum, visit their partner page here or their website here.


Greensboro Area Yearbooks and Student Publications Added

New to our site is a sizable collection of yearbooks and other campus materials from Greensboro. These items came to us from our partners at the Greensboro History Museum and Greensboro Public Library, and mark the beginning of our partnership with Greensboro Public Library.

A drivers education car is sandwiched between two structures.

Drivers Education at Page High School was clearly not for the faint of heart, as evidenced here in the 1965 Buccaneer.

Included in this batch are 31 yearbooks from Greensboro, Smith, Walter Hines Page, and Bessemer High Schools spanning from 1916 to 1967. There is also a hand-written roster kept by Greensboro Senior High School that contains the names and other information such as colleges attended, marital status, and addresses of the school’s graduates from 1922 to 1966.

1954 Whirligig Inside

The inside cover of the 1954 edition of Whirligig, Greensboro High School’s Yearbook, shows “The Setting of the GHS Story 1953-1954.” This setting includes the bunny hop, a fact-filled science building, the fountain of youth, and many references to Greensboro native O. Henry.

Alongside the yearbooks are student literary magazines from Greensboro High School. These student publications — titled Greensboro High School Magazine, The Sage and Homespun  — include poems, plays, stories, and more. The earliest of these digitized in this batch is from 1907 and the most recent from 1960.

Covers from Homespun, Greensboro High School's Literary Magazine

The covers for Greensboro High School’s Student Literary magazine — Homespun — creatively depict the theme of each edition. Shown here are four covers of the magazine printed between 1927 and 1931.

Materials from Greensboro History Museum can be found here, and the materials from the Greensboro Public Library here. For more information about Greensboro History Museum, visit their website or partner page. For additional information on Greensboro Public Library, check out their partner page or website.


Greensboro High School Student Magazines and Yearbooks Now Available on DigitalNC

A student speaking to a crowd of other students, 1958

A new batch of over two dozen yearbooks from Greensboro High School has been digitized and made available on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Greensboro History Museum. Dating from 1910 to 1958, this collection includes annual yearbooks, a 1906 copy of the Greensboro High School Magazine, and several issues of Homespun, Greensboro High School’s literary magazine dating back to the 1920s and 1930s.

These yearbooks include individual portraits, class portraits, photos of faculty, and more. They also highlight photographs of student activities, social clubs, the school’s orchestra and band, the school’s sports teams, and more.

The 1925 Greensboro High School Hockey team

This batch also includes copies of magazines that students worked to write, edit, and publish. The Greensboro High School Magazine, the first of its kind to be uploaded to DigitalNC, was published three times a year by the students, and included editorials, short stories, and more. One student wrote about his experience riding along with Presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan as he was traveling throughout the South, for example.  The school’s other magazine, Homespun, highlights the writing and literary accomplishments of the students, including smaller fictional short stories, poems, 1-act plays, and more.

Follow the links below to browse the items included in this batch:

To learn more about the Greensboro History Museum, you can find more information by visiting their partner page or taking a look at their website.


More issues of the Greensboro High School student newspaper are available on DigitalNC

Thanks to our partner, the Greensboro History Museum, additional issues of the student newspaper from the former Greensboro High School, High Life, are now available on DigitalNC. Newly available issues cover the years 1923-1926, 1937-1941, 1957, and 1976-1978. The paper features information from the high school, now Grimsley High School, and the surrounding Greensboro community.

As a school newspaper, written by students and for students, High Life focuses on its students’ activities. Seniors are featured each May, and several of these special issues include “Last Will and Testament” sections where those leaving the school “give” things to the freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. For example, “Bill Hancock is to receive Ed McDowell’s dramatic trend,” and “R. D. Apple reluctantly relinquishes his long-held position on the mound to Hampton Shuping.”

Greensboro High School Seniors of 1938, May 31, 1938

Greensboro High School Seniors of 1938, May 31, 1938

The students’ comic traditions continue in some of the articles included throughout the paper.

One student published an account of having the measles:

"Home With Measles or How Did I Get in This Fix?," May 30, 1941

“Home With Measles or How Did I Get in This Fix?,” May 30, 1941

Decades later, an unnamed student announced her addiction to the television network HBO:

"Girl Is HBO Addict," May 25, 1978

“Girl Is HBO Addict,” May 25, 1978

To see more from the Greensboro High School student newspaper, click here. To learn more about the Greensboro History Museum, visit their website or their DigitalNC partner page.

 


Student newspapers from Greensboro High School now available

Front page of the February 12, 1926 issue of High Life

Front page of the February 12, 1926 issue of High Life

Nineteen issues of High Life, the student newspaper from Greensboro High School, are now available on DigitalNC, thanks to our partner, the Greensboro History Museum. Issues include documentation of significant events in the school’s community from 1923 to 1926, 1941 to 1942, and 1954. Articles cover subjects such as athletics and other extracurricular activities, social events, curriculum information, and social commentary. The newspaper also includes advertisements for local stores, opinion pieces, and cartoons such as the one below, included to illustrate the hope of a new semester:

"Dawn of a New Opportunity," cartoon by Erich Nau

“Dawn of a New Opportunity,” cartoon by Erich Nau

Though this is the first high school student newspaper from Greensboro to be available on DigitalNC, it complements several others from High Point, which is nearby and also in Guilford County. You can browse High Point High School’s student newspaper, The Pointer, here and other student newspapers from across the state here.

To see more from the Greensboro History Museum, you can visit their partner page here, or visit their website for more information.


Greensboro World War II Base Newspapers Available Online

Cover of The Rotator from December 21, 1945I’m excited to announce a new addition to the North Carolina Newspapers collection: a complete run of newspapers from the Basic Training Camp and Overseas Relocation Depot, located in Greensboro during World War II, is now available on DigitalNC. The newspapers are from the collections of the Greensboro Historical Museum.

The base saw more than 330,000 soldiers pass through between 1943 and its closing in 1946. The base newspaper began publication in March 1943 and ran through September 1946, producing a total of 176 issues. The newspaper documented all aspects of life on the base, especially the social and sporting activities of the enlisted men. We’ll post a few highlights and interesting photos from the paper over the next few weeks.

[Update, January 2015. This newspaper can be viewed online in the Greensboro Historical Newspapers collection, hosted by UNC-Greensboro.]


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This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features the latest news and highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from organizations across North Carolina.

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