Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries posted in October 2019


More newspapers and engineering drawings from the Chapel Hill Historical Society are now available

Thanks to our partners at the Chapel Hill Historical Society, DigitalNC is happy to be able to provide access to two groups of materials from their collection online. A new set of drawings that illustrate the civil engineering and planning of Chapel Hill, and more issues of The Lincoln Echo from Chapel Hill’s Lincoln High School.

Only a few dozen issues are known to exist of The Lincoln Echopublished by the pre-integration African American high school of Chapel Hill, making this resource vital for the community. Our digital holdings of the paper now cover 1949 to 1965, and we also have issues of its precursor, The Orange Echofrom 1944 to 1947. The May 1945 issue of The Lincoln Echo is particularly noteworthy as it includes seniors’ reflections on graduating in light of V-E Day, which happened around the same time. One student said, “The outlook for myself is that when this war is over I will have equal opportunities with anyone, and be able to earn an honest dollar regardless of my color.”

The other digital additions in this batch are comprised of engineering drawings for the planning of the town. These drawings include scaled radiuses of fire trucks and garbage trucks, used to calculate the necessary dimensions for streets. Also, there are drawings of various street details, such as bus shelters, sidewalks, curbs, and other elements. The batch also includes plans for several roads around town, including Airport Road (NC86), now known as Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., pictured below.

Click here to view all of the newspapers from the Chapel Hill Historical Society, and here to view all other materials. To learn more about the organization, visit their partner page here or their website here.

 


1950s Creedmoor High School Yearbooks are available now!

 
Creedmoor High School yearbook, 1952

Creedmoor High School yearbook, 1952

Four Creedmoor High School yearbooks, from 1952 to 1955, are now digitized and available on DigitalNC thanks to our partners at Granville County Public Library. DigitalNC had previously only hosted the 1951 annual. Creedmoor High School was the local school until 1962, when the consolidated South Granville High School opened. Click here to browse all Granville County yearbooks on DigitalNC, from 1912 to  1968, including the only other yearbook from Creedmoor, the G. C. Hawley High School Hornet from 1967 and 1968.

To learn more about our partner the Granville County Public Library, visit their partner page here or their website here. To browse yearbooks from across North Carolina, click here.

 


Photographs from Johnston Community College are now available on DigitalNC

Electronic welcome sign, Johnston Community College, 1985

Electronic welcome sign, Johnston Community College, 1985

Approximately 750 photographs from Johnston Community College have recently been digitized and added to the website, thanks to our partnership with the school. Mostly from the 1970s and 1980s, the photographs include images of campus, students, and staff at the main Smithfield campus as well as the Four Oaks Howell Woods campus.

The photographs in this collection are diverse in subject matter, comprising everything from photos of the College’s first president, John Tart, to the College’s Truck Driver Training program, to photos of various buildings on campus throughout stages of their construction and renovation.

One of the most unique collections in this batch is the almost completely reproduced set of photos from the 1989 yearbook. This is particularly useful as it provides original colored photographs to compare against the black and white yearbook.

Marshall Casey, Carole Lawerence, Angela Batts, and Becky Turnage, from the staff of the 1989 Retrospect Yearbook

Marshall Casey, Carole Lawerence, Angela Batts, and Becky Turnage, from the staff of the 1989 Retrospect Yearbook

To see all of the photographs in this batch, click here. DigitalNC also hosts several yearbooks from Johnston Community College from this time period–click here to view them. To learn more about Johnston Community College, visit their partner page here or their website here.


Materials dating back to 1876 now online from Union County Public Library

In a new batch of items from partner Union County Public Library, which they digitized themselves, there are materials that date all the way back to 1876.  A catalog for Monroe High School from 1876 details all the classes one could take at the school, which was a white, private, co-educational school that advertised not only to those who lived in Monroe, but in the surrounding area, including South Carolina.  In the first section of the book it lists the enrollment at the school and hometowns of each student.  The cost for 20 weeks at the school was $10-$16 tuition plus $50 for room and board.  page listing the students enrolled at Monroe High School

Other materials from this batch include several Chamber of Commerce publications promoting Monroe, NC, a feature on the new library in Monroe, and the minutes of the Union County Medical Association from 1902 to 1922.  The Medical Association minutes are particularly interesting in mentioning about a black doctor, Dr. J.S. Massey, being a member in 1903 in what was otherwise an all white organization.  This would have been during a time of increasing segregation and aggression by whites against black in North Carolina following the Plessy vs. Ferguson decision and the 1898 race riots in Wilmington and the shift in the government in 1900 to a white supremacist Democratic leadership. 

There is also a yearbook from 1954 from Union High School that was located in Lanes Creek Township.  

To view more materials from Union County Public Library, visit their partner page.  


Editions of the Meredith College Herald and Oak Leaves Now Available!

Thanks to our partner, Meredith College, we now have more editions of the Meredith College student newspapers the Meredith Herald and the Twig, and the yearbook, Oak Leaves.

Front page of the September 12, 2018 issue of the Meredith Herald.

This batch includes issues of the Twig from April 10, 1965-May 25, 1966 and issues of the Meredith Herald from March 4, 2015-April 10, 2019. Both newspapers report on events both at the college and in the surrounding area. The issues of the Twig include topics such as drinking legislation updates and graduation schedule announcements. Issues of the Herald include topics such as the Silent Sam controversy at UNC-Chapel Hill and the name change for the Meredith College newspaper from the Twig to the Meredith Herald. Also recently uploaded are editions of Oak Leaves, the yearbook of Meredith College, from 2010-2018.

The cover of the 2015 edition of Oak Leaves, the yearbook of Meredith College.

To view all of the items we’ve scanned for Meredith take a look at their contributor page. For more information about this partner, visit their website.


Additional Photographs Showcasing Edgecombe County’s Historic Architecture Online Now

A newly digitized batch of photographs of historic homes and structures in Edgecombe County has been added to our website, courtesy of our partner, the Edgecombe County Memorial Library. Follow this link see the previously published batch of photos and this link to see the blog post about the previous batch of photographs.

One of the houses exhibited in these photographs is the Hart House, built by William A. Hart, a well-known Edgecombe County businessman and farmer, in 1909. This home is a rare example of a columned house in the Neo-Classical style in Tarboro.

The M. A. Hart House, located at 1109 Main St. in Tarboro, N.C.

Another house that can be seen in the batch of photographs is the J. J. Green House. This two-story home with its blend of Queen Anne and Neo-Classical architectural themes was built around 1900 by Rocky Mount architect John C. Stout, the cashier of the Bank of Tarboro.

A photograph of the J. J. Green House, located at 800 Main St. in Tarboro, N.C.

For more about the Edgecombe County Memorial Library, visit their partner page or check out their website.


Several Wayne County Boy’s Club Scrapbooks are now live!

Several scrapbooks from the Wayne County Boy’s Club have been added to our website, courtesy of our partner the Wayne County Public Library. These scrapbooks include histories of the club, photos, newspaper clippings, and other memorabilia from or related to the Wayne County Boy’s Club. They roughly span the years of 1946-1980.  The scrapbook from 1974-1975 focuses on the integration of the Boys Club in Goldsboro, when the EA House and Paley units of the club combined.  

The cover of the Boy’s Club Scrapbook containing materials from the period between 1946-1959.

In addition to these scrapbooks, this batch also includes the program from the Eastern North Carolina Drama Festival, which was held at Goldsboro High School on March 27-29, 1947.

For more information on the Wayne County Public Library, please visit their website.


Sixteen yearbooks from Surry County are now available on DigitalNC

Thanks to our partners at Surry Community College, DigitalNC is proud to host sixteen new yearbooks from Surry County. The batch consists of 8 yearbooks from Pilot Mountain High School (1947-1961) in Pilot Mountain, 4 yearbooks from Beulah High School (1956-1959) in Dobson, and 4 yearbooks from Surry Central High School in Dobson (1965-1968).

The Eaglet of Beulah High School, 1956

The Eaglet of Beulah High School, 1956

The yearbooks provide insight into the lives of students at the three schools in the mid-twentieth century, sharing memories of academic and extracurricular activities.

The Aquila, 1966

The Aquila of Surry Central High School, 1966

We are thankful to Surry Community College for helping us make these yearbooks accessible online. To view all 16 yearbooks in this batch, click here. To see all digitized materials from Surry Community College, click here. To learn more about the college, visit their partner page here or their website here.


Publications from the Penland School of Craft now available!

Thanks to our new partner, the Penland School of Craft, we now have course catalogs covering the years 1939-1962, nine issues of the Grapevine campus newsletter, several issues of the Mountain Milestones pamphlets from 1932-1962, Annual Reports from 1998-2015, and the student publications The Story of the Penland Weavers and the Weaver’s Hornbook: Tale of What Is Weaving WhereThe Penland Line, a newspaper published by the staff of Penland for the Penland and wider craft community, is also now on DigitalNC.  

Penland School of Craft is an educational institution in Penland, NC. It was founded by Lucy Morgan in 1929 and it functions to this day as an educational community for craft artists, offering courses in mediums such as book arts and textiles. Students live on-campus throughout the duration of their workshops, and they only take one workshop at a time to ensure total immersion in their chosen craft. The school also offer a number of residencies and fellowships throughout the year.

The cover of the course catalog for the tenth session of the Penland School, which spanned the time period of June 26th to August 26th, 1939.

For more information about the Penland School of Craft, visit their institutional website.


The Concord Times is now available on DigitalNC!

The Concord Times, February 19, 1923

The Concord Times, February 19, 1923

520 issues of The Concord Times from 1923 to 1927 have recently been digitized and added to DigitalNC thanks to a nomination from our partner Cabarrus County Public Library! The paper from Concord, North Carolina, documents 1920s happenings around the town, the state, and beyond. Published every Tuesday and Thursday, the paper frequently delivered news to its readers. A sampling of clippings  are shared below:

The Concord Times, October 11, 1923

The Concord Times, October 11, 1923

The Concord Times, July 1, 1926

The Concord Times, July 1, 1926

To learn more about The Concord Times and see all 500+ issues, click here. For other digitized newspapers from Concord, North Carolina, visit this page.