Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries posted in November 2021


Newspapers, Maps Added to DigitalNC from the Chapel Hill Historical Society

Top half of the February 11, 1957 issue of the News Leader with a blurry black and white photo of a mule in front of a house.

The front page of the February 11, 1957 issue of the Chapel Hill News Leader features a snapshot of a mule that kept straying onto the property of the local mayor.

We’ve worked with the Chapel Hill Historical Society to share additional materials from their collections. This batch includes more issues of the following newspapers:

The issues of the News Leader discuss town and county news, as well as a hefty amount of news related to UNC-Chapel Hill. Items related to politics and education frequently take center stage on the front page.

In addition to these newspaper issues the Historical Society shared a variety of maps and plans related to Carrboro and Chapel Hill. Included are plans for a sewer project and plans for a local development called “Laketree Center.”

To view all of the items the Chapel Hill Historical Society has shared head to their contributor page


Thomas H. Braswell Collection items now online from Braswell Memorial Library

Thanks to our partner, Braswell Memorial Library, Digital NC now has new memorabilia items and images that are now available relating to the history of the library itself! Located in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, the library has been a staple within the community since the 1930s. Below is a photo of the Thomas H. Braswell Memorial Library from the 1930s. In addition to memorabilia items, you can also find images of former staff and different events such as the Bookmobile and photos from Banned Book Week.

Braswell Library

The outside of Braswell Memorial Library, located in Rocky Mount, NC.

 

To learn more about Braswell Memorial Library, visit their website here.

To find additional items from Braswell Memorial Library on our website, visit here. 


40 Additional titles from New Bern, Wilmington, Raleigh, Edenton

Header of a Wilmington, North Carolina newspaper titled North-Carolina Gazette from 1765.

Over the next year, we’ll be adding millions of newspaper images to DigitalNC. These images were originally digitized a number of years ago in a partnership with Newspapers.com. That project focused on scanning microfilmed papers published before 1923 held by the North Carolina Collection in Wilson Special Collections Library. While you can currently search all of those pre-1923 issues on Newspapers.com, over the next year we will also make them available in our newspaper database as well. This will allow you to search that content alongside the 2 million pages already on our site – all completely open access and free to use.

This week’s additions are the following:

  1. The Morning Star (Wilmington, N.C.) – 1867-1901
  2. Carolina Centinel (New Bern, N.C.) – 1818-1822
  3. The Newbernian (New Bern, N.C.) – 1843-1848
  4. Newbern Spectator (New Bern, N.C.) – 1834
  5. New Berne Daily Times (New Bern, N.C.) – 1866-1874
  6. The Wilmington Messenger (Wilmington, N.C.) – 1890-1907
  7. The New Era and Commercial Advertiser (New Bern, N.C.) – 1854-1859
  8. Daily Progress (New Bern, N.C.) – 1858-1861
  9. The Carolina Farmer and Morning Star (Wilmington, N.C.) – 1871-1874
  10. The Daily Journal (New Bern, N.C.) – 1882-1914
  11. The Morning New Bernian (New Bern, N.C.) – 1916-1917
  12. The Encyclopedian Instructor and Farmer’s Gazette (Edenton, N.C.) – 1785-1801
  13. The Herald of the Union (Wilmington, N.C.) – 1865
  14. The Daily Herald (Wilmington, N.C.) – 1854-1861
  15. The Weekly Messenger (Wilmington, N.C.) – 1892-1896
  16. The New Bern Sun Journal (New Bern, N.C.) – 1920-1922
  17. New Berne Weekly Journal (New Bern, N.C.) – 1884-1913
  18. Saturday Record (Wilmington, N.C.) – 1915-1937
  19. North-Carolina Gazette (Wilmington, N.C.) – 1769-1800
  20. The Daily Dispatch (Wilmington, N.C.) – 1865-1866
  21. The New Bernian (New Bern, N.C.) – 1921-1924
  22. North Carolina Christian Advocate (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1874-1909
  23. The Daily Progress (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1862-1864
  24. The Raleigh News (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1872-1880
  25. The Friend of Temperance (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1868-1879
  26. Newbern Sentinel (New Bern, N.C.) – 1834-1837
  27. Weekly Conservative (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1864-1865
  28. The Farmer and Mechanic (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1905
  29. The Raleigh Microcosm (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1838-1843
  30. The Morning Post (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1897-1899
  31. The Harbinger (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1902-1904
  32. The Daily Evening Visitor (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1892-1893
  33. The Raleigh Evening Times (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1905-1908
  34. The Evening Times (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1908-1910
  35. The Raleigh Daily Times (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1910
  36. The Progressive Farmer (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1906-1922
  37. The Wilmington Post (Wilmington, N.C.) – 1867-1877
  38. The Evening Dispatch (Wilmington, N.C.) – 1914
  39. The Evening Visitor (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1879-1881
  40. The Friend and Templar (Raleigh, N.C.) – 1876-1880

If you want to see all of the newspapers we have available on DigitalNC, you can find them here. Thanks to UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries for permission to and support for adding all of this content as well as the content to come. We also thank the North Caroliniana Society for providing funding to support staff working on this project.


Massey Family Letters Now Available

Thanks to our partner, Matthews Heritage Museum, and funding from a North Carolina State Historical Records Advisory Board (SHRAB) grant, Massey family letters from the late 1800s are now available on our website. A majority of the letters are written to Dr. Henry V. Massey and provide a look into the lives of various Massey family members as well as their acquaintances.

The letter below was written by Oliver M. Perry to his uncle, Dr. Henry V. Massey, on October 6, 1876. In his letter, Oliver goes into great detail about Dr. Massey’s sister Rachel, discussing her desire to move back to “Old Carolina” and commenting that she is “doing as well as could be expected as she has no husband.” In addition, Oliver discusses his hopes for his uncle to travel down to see him, this years crop yields, the health of family members, sickness in the community, as well as his current job and relationship status.

Letter from Oliver M. Perry to Dr. H. V. Massey talking about what's currently going on in his life.

Letter from Oliver M. Perry to Dr. Henry V. Massey.

To read the rest of Oliver’s letter to his uncle, please click here.

To learn more about the Matthews Heritage Museum, please visit their website.

To view more materials from the Matthews Heritage Museum, please click here.


New Partner contributes Dismal Swamp Canal Photographs

Dismal Swamp Canal Welcome Center header

Thanks to our newest partner, Dismal Swamp Canal Welcome Center, a batch of over 50 photographs of Camden County and the Dismal Swamp are now available on our website. The photographs feature a glance at the various stages of construction on the Dismal Swamp, locomotives, the Dismal Swamp locks, fishing, and individuals. These materials were scanned during our trip to Camden County to scan materials for both the Camden County Heritage Museum as well as the Welcome Center.Commercial boat on the side of a canal with several people standing on the boat and two children standing on the shore in front of it.

Of the 59 photographs that were scanned, the most riveting are ones that depict individuals on the Dismal Swamp Canal. The first photograph (above) shows a commercial boat loaded up with several passengers waiting to depart. The second picture below depicts three individuals fishing while the third shows a person rowing.Three individuals in a boat on the Dismal Swamp with a fishing net in their hands.

Person with a hat and heavy coat rowing a boat on the Dismal Swamp.

To read more about our trip to Camden and view materials from the Camden County Heritage Museum, please click here.

To learn more about the Dismal Swamp Canal Welcome Center, please visit their website.

 


100 Counties! New Materials from the Camden County Museum Heritage Museum Now Online

Table with scanners and a laptop inside a brightly lit museum space with one person seated and scanning and two people standing and looking at a book

L-R Ashlie Brewer (NCDHC) scans while Lisa Gregory (NCDHC) looks at materials with Brian Forehand (Camden County Heritage Museum)

We have an exciting milestone to announce – with the addition of the Camden County Heritage Museum  and the Dismal Swamp Canal Welcome Center we have now worked with at least one partner organization in all of North Carolina’s 100 counties. NCDHC staff received a warm welcome in Camden County at the end of August when we traveled there to scan materials for both of these organizations.

Black English text on beige paper advertisin typhoid fever and diptheria vaccines in Camden CountyOur post today shares the materials we scanned from the Museum (stay tuned for a future post about the Welcome Center’s materials). From photos to maps to brochures to handwritten research notes, the Museum selected a variety of items that document important aspects of the county’s history. Some of the longer and more detailed items are mentioned below:

We were especially interested to read the typhoid fever and diptheria vaccine announcement shown to the right, which seems especially timely during the current pandemic. Note that the author called out the races separately and that people had to go to a specific location based on their assigned race.

You can view all of the items from the Camden County Heritage Museum on the Museum’s contributor page, or all of the materials we have related to Camden County on the Camden County page on our site.


This Week’s 25 New Newspaper Titles – New Bern, Wilmington, Fayetteville, Goldsboro

Header for Wilmington, N.C. newspaper The Carolina Farmer & Morning star, August 26, 1870

Over the next year, we’ll be adding millions of newspaper images to DigitalNC. These images were originally digitized a number of years ago in a partnership with Newspapers.com. That project focused on scanning microfilmed papers published before 1923 held by the North Carolina Collection in Wilson Special Collections Library. While you can currently search all of those pre-1923 issues on Newspapers.com, over the next year we will also make them available in our newspaper database as well. This will allow you to search that content alongside the 2 million pages already on our site – all completely open access and free to use. 

Here are this week’s additions:

If you want to see all of the newspapers we have available on DigitalNC, you can find them here. Thanks to UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries for permission to and support for adding all of this content as well as the content to come. We also thank the North Caroliniana Society for providing funding to support staff working on this project.


New Items from Gates County now on Digital NC

 

Sunbury High School

Sunbury High School Pamphlet from the 1908 – 1909 school year. Sunbury High School was a former high school in Gates County.

 

Digitial NC now has new materials thanks to our partner Gates County Public Library, including the Gates County Index newspaper and memorabilia from Sunbury High School. This addition makes Gates County our 99th county towards our mission of making North Carolina history accessible to all.

The Gates County Index ranges from November 1942 to February 1956 and covers local stories from Gates County and surrounding areas. The Sunbury High School Pamphlet dates back to 1908 and gives an overview of the upcoming school year, including moving into the new school building.

To see all the materials from Gates County Public Library, visit them here.

To access our North Carolina newspaper collection, visit here.

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52 Newspaper titles from NDNP available on DigitalNC

The header for a Raleigh, N.C. newspaper from 1865 titled Journal of Freedom.

This week we are sharing the second installment of titles on DigitalNC that were brought to us by the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) in a cooperative effort with the North Carolina Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries.

The NDNP is a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress with the intention of creating a vast, searchable database of newspapers and other historical documents. You can currently search all of the NDNP issues on the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America website. Those same issues will be available on our newspaper database, allowing you to search that content alongside the other papers on DigitalNC.  The week’s titles are the following:

This concludes the list of newspapers that we are sharing from the NDNP. If you want to see all of the newspapers we have available on DigitalNC, you can find them here. Thanks to UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries for permission to and support for adding all of this content as well as the content to come. We also thank the North Caroliniana Society for providing funding to support staff working on this project.


Contributions of Vance County People of Color now available on DigitalNC

The book Contributions of Vance County People of Color by Ruth Anita Hawkins Hughes is now available on DigitalNC.  Thanks to a request from a community member, the folks at Granville County Public Library, and UNC Libraries, we were able to digitize this book.  

Four black and white photographs, top left is a woman in a large white dress who is sitting posed, top right is a child in a white dress standing posed, bottom left is a woman on the phone and the bottom right is a woman in a white nursing outfit holding a dog

Photographs of people discussed in the book are included

Written in 1988, the book contains vignettes about many Black residents of Vance County during the 20th century.  The book is broken up into chapters about farm families, and town families, and then by different occupations in the county.  An amazing resource particularly for genealogists, Contributions… is full text searchable, making it easy to search names quickly!  

To view more materials about the Black community in North Carolina, visit our African American newspapers collection and our general collection here.