Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries by Elizabeth Blackwood


New Batch of Materials from the American Society of Furniture Designers

Newspaper, Magazine Clippings Concerning the American Society of Furniture Designers [2016], page 10

Newspaper, Magazine Clippings Concerning the American Society of Furniture Designers [2016], page 10

Newspaper, Magazine Clippings Concerning the American Society of Furniture Designers [2016], page 2

Newspaper, Magazine Clippings Concerning the American Society of Furniture Designers [2016], page 2

The newest batch from the American Society of Furniture Designers is now avaible on DigitalNC!

ASFD is an international, non-profit professional organization dedicated to supporting furniture designers and their positive impact on the market. Physically located in High Point, NC, ASFD’s library holds many types of interesting records and memorabilia relating to the furniture industry in North Carolina and internationally. ASFD’s collection of materials on DigitalNC documents the majority of its existence and is a useful tool for those interested in the furniture industry and its impact on North Carolina.

This batch contains newspaper, magazine, and web publications about the society’s activities during 2016. These focus on the Pinnacle Awards for exceptional furniture designs, the Luminary Awards, and other mentions of the organization in the media.

To learn more about the American Society of Furniture Designers, please visit the partner page or the website. To see more documents and memorabilia from other organizations in North Carolina, please browse the North Caroline Memory Collection.


Genealogy Newsletters, Cooking Related Materials Now Available Online from Braswell Memorial Library

Royal Palm Restaurant Menu, page 2

Royal Palm Restaurant Menu, page 2

Thanks to our partner, Braswell Memorial Library in Rocky Mount, DigitalNC has published a number of new materials in the North Carolina Memory Collection.

Included in this batch are several cooking related items. A vintage menu from the Royal Palms Restaurant in Rocky Mount documents the variety of prices and meals available at the local establishment. This item is a unique addition, as DigitalNC only has three published menus on the site. If you are more interested in doing some cooking of your own, check out the Kentucky Cookbook from Bygone Days. This unique item was transcribed from an 18880’s collection of recipes created by several women with connections to North Carolina. The recipes are included along with descriptions and family histories, adding some depth and context to the cookbook’s entries. Try your hand at making some nineteenth century ginger pudding or molasses pie!

Also in this batch are nearly seventy issues of “The Connector,” the newsletter of the Tar River Connections Genealogical Society. The Connector contains articles from members of the society, detailing their research in family and local history. They include many maps, rosters, names, dates, and other information that could be useful genealogy research–all aggregated in one place. These newsletters are full-text searchable, allowing researchers to easy search through the nearly 1200 pages of material. You can view all of the newsletters from Braswell Memorial Library at the following link.

To learn more about Braswell Memorial Library, please visit the contributor page or the website. To see more items like these that are digitized and available on DigitalNC, please visit the North Carolina Memory Collection.

Recipes for Ambrosia Filling, Cream Pie, and Molasses Pie-- Kentucky Cookbook, page 39

Recipes for Ambrosia Filling, Cream Pie, and Molasses Pie– Kentucky Cookbook, page 39


1964-1965 City Directories Now Available for Albemarle from the Stanly County Museum

Hill's Albemarle (Stanly County, N.C.) City Directory [1965], page 19

Hill’s Albemarle (Stanly County, N.C.) City Directory [1965], page 19

Thanks to the Stanly County Museum, two city directories for Albemarle are now available online!

The new additions bring the count of Albemarle city directories to nine, documenting the business history of the city from 1910 to 1965. These directories, as well as all of those hosted on DigitalNC, are full-text searchable across the site. This makes it easy for researchers to find the names, locations, and dates of relevant information.

City Directories are useful for more than just research. They are also full of unique, local advertisements, like the one shown below. Ads like these demonstrate the creativity and style of business owners of the time period. They can also be a lot of fun!

The two directories are linked below:

To learn more about the Stanly County Museum, please visit the contributor page or the website. To view more city directories from your area, please browse the North Carolina City Directories Collection.

Hill's Albemarle (Stanly County, N.C.) City Directory [1965], page 73

Hill’s Albemarle (Stanly County, N.C.) City Directory [1965], page 73


Detailed 1904 map of Anson County now online from new partner, Anson County Historical Society

anson

DigitalNC is happy to welcome a new partner– the Anson County Historical Society!

The Anson County Historical society is an organization devoted to providing access to Anson County’s rich history through educational, cultural, and recreational resources. This includes the preservation of physical items, like this map from 1904. An excellent resource for genealogists or local historians, this map documents family names and property locations in addition the other intricate details, like schools, cemeteries, businesses, railroads, and homesteads. Maps with this much detail are rare and serve as excellent research tools.

For more information about the Anson County Historical Society, please visit the contributor page or the website. For maps of North Carolina on DigitalNC, please search the Images of North Carolina Collection and limit by “maps.”


Telephone directories highlighting areas from around eastern North Carolina now online

Brawell Memorial Library (Rocky Mount, N.C.), covers

Braswell Memorial Library (Rocky Mount, N.C.), covers

14 phone directories are now available for search and use on DigitalNC!

Phone directories, like city directories, offer a wealth of information for researchers and genealogists. Each contains pages dedicated to using the directory and even using a phone. Some of the younger users of this site may have never used a physical phone book, made a collect call, or utilized a phone booth. While that may be shocking to some, resources like these could serve as excellent teaching tools to help younger users and students understand the differences in how people have communicated over the past few decades.

You can see all of the newly digitized directories at the links below:

Telephone Directory for Rocky Mount, Enfield, Nashville, Spring Hope, Tarboro, and Whitakers [1937], page 4

Telephone Directory for Rocky Mount, Enfield, Nashville, Spring Hope, Tarboro, and Whitakers [1937], page 4

To learn more about Rocky Mount, N.C. and the surrounding areas, check all of the materials that Braswell Memorial Library has contributed to DigitalNC. To learn more about the library, please visit the website or the contributor page.


New yearbooks from Benson Museum of Local History are full of character

tatler_1964p1

The Tatler [1964], page 1

Our partner, Benson Museum of Local History, has contributed two more yearbooks that are now available online.

These yearbooks detail the lives and activities of students from Benson High School in Johnston County. This high school has regularly demonstrated creativity and character in its yearbooks and these do not disappoint. Resources like these are great tools for genealogical research and lesson planning. They could also serve as vintage look books for those interested in the fashion and hairstyles of the 1960’s.

The new yearbooks are linked below:

Another interesting feature of these yearbooks is their

The Tatler [1964], page 71

The Tatler [1964], page 71

condition. Both of these editions of the Tatler are well used and contain the many handwritten notes by the original owner and friends. The 1964 copy contains notes on nearly every page! Many of the yearbooks that our partners contribute are in pristine condition, serving as excellent original documents; however, these copies from the Benson Museum contain the life and character of their owners– a unique aspect for digitized archival collections. The image pictured at the top is an example.

You can learn more about Benson High School and the Benson Museum of Local History by viewing the contributor page or the website. To see more high school yearbooks, perhaps from your community, please browse the North Carolina Yearbooks Collection and limit your search by High School Yearbooks.


See how UNC School of Dentistry students relaxed in 1984

Impressions [1984], page 5

Impressions [1984], page 5

Some may think that Dental School is all work and no play, but that was certainly not the case at UNC School of Dentistry during the 1980’s! Thanks to the North Carolina Collection at UNC Chapel Hill Libraries, the 1984 edition of the Impressions yearbook is now available online!

Check out the photos below for a window into the fun had by dentists in training!

Impressions [1984], page 9

Impressions [1984], page 9

Impressions [1984], page 31

Impressions [1984], page 31

Impressions [1984], page 41

Impressions [1984], page 41

Impressions [1984], page 61

Impressions [1984], page 61

Impressions [1984], page 72

Impressions [1984], page 72

To learn more about the history of UNC School of Dentistry through the materials published on Digital NC, please click the following link. To learn more about the University of North Carolina at Chapel and see other digitized items from the North Carolina Collection, please visit the contributor page or the homepage for the North Carolina Collection.


Yearbooks, Campus Publications from Charlotte Mecklenburg Library Offer a Window into a Segregated North Carolina

De Hi Sco [1947], page 74

De Hi Sco [1947], page 74

A new batch of yearbooks and campus publications from Charlotte Mecklenburg Library adds more primary sources to help tell the story of segregation in the Charlotte Mecklenburg School System during the mid-twentieth century. The yearbooks tell the stories of the predominantly white community, while the catalogs document education in the segregated black community in the Charlotte area.

The yearbooks are like many hosted on DigitalNC, documenting the lives and activities of students during the early 1950’s. They reflect many of the fashion and cultural patterns of the period for students in the white community.

The Viking [1952], page 44

The Viking [1952], page 44

Newly Digitized Yearbooks:

In addition, this batch also contains several campus publications from Carver College (later Mecklenburg College), the predominantly black community college in the area. The catalogues detail the many program offerings and degree types that were available for students.

Carver College has a unique story. This community college and its white counterpart, Charlotte College, were the center pivot of the segregation debate for the Charlotte Mecklenburg School System during the early 1960’s. The debate centered on whether Charlotte needed both community colleges or if the city could be served by just one, integrated community college. These catalogs demonstrate the level of education at stake for those in the black community in Charlotte, prior to the community college debate. You can see more primary sources about the community college debate in Charlotte by following this link to another post on the DigitalNC Blog.

Newly Digitized Campus Publications:

Carver College Annual Catalogue [1959-1960], page 2

Carver College Annual Catalogue [1959-1960], page 2

Mecklenburg College Annual Catalogue [1962-1963], page 2

Mecklenburg College Annual Catalogue [1962-1963], page 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All of these documents help to paint a picture of segregation, desegregation, and the complexities involved with each for a complicated debate in mid-century North Carolina. These primary sources could be excellent resources for teachers creating lesson plans about this period, seeking tangible documents from local communities.

To learn more about Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, please visit their contributor page or their homepage. To see more yearbooks and campus publications that tell the stories of communities in times of transition, check out the North Carolina Yearbooks Collection and limit your search by year.


World War II era Winston-Salem city directories now online

 

Hill's Winston-Salem City (Forsyth County, N.C.) Directory [1945], page 5

Hill’s Winston-Salem City (Forsyth County, N.C.) Directory [1945], page 5

Forsyth County Public Library has provided four more city directories documenting Winston Salem and the surrounding area. These directories cover 1940-1945, adding to the set that was previously available. The large volumes can be extremely useful for many types of researchers because they are full-text searchable. City directories offer a wealth of information about property rights, business ownership, and local economic history.

You can view all of the newly available city directories at the links below:

To view more city directories from the Forsyth County Public Library and browse all of their collections available on DigitalNC, please visit the contributor page. To learn more about the library and the services that it offers, please visit the website.


Additional Yearbook added from C.M. Eppes High School Alumni Heritage Society, Inc.

Eppesonian [1958], page 49

Eppesonian [1958], page 49

The 1958 edition of the Eppesonian is now available on DigitalNC!

Thanks to the C.M. Eppes High School Alumni Heritage Society, Inc., this yearbook adds to the run of yearbooks that are already available online. They document nearly 15 years of student life at the high school, located in Greenville, NC. You view all of the digitized editions at the following link. Eppes High School was a segregated high school until 1970, at which time it merged with Junius H. Rose High School.

To learn more about C.M. Eppes High School and the Alumni Heritage Society visit the contributor page. To view more yearbooks that document the lives of African American high school students in North Carolina, browse the African American High School Yearbooks Collection.

Eppesonian [1958], page 58

Eppesonian [1958], page 58