Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries by Spencer Bevis


New Yearbooks From Wayne County Now Online at DigitalNC

A birds eye view of Goldsboro High School, taken in 1968.

A new batch of yearbooks from Wayne County are now available on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, Wayne County Public Library. In this collection are over half a dozen yearbooks from the 1950s and 1960s from across Wayne County, including the city of Goldsboro and the towns of Dudley and Pikeville.

These yearbooks include individual portraits, class portraits, and more. They also include photographs of activities, student clubs, and the schools’ sports teams. These yearbooks highlight different parts of the student bodies, including the history clubs, the technical students, the students involved in foreign language classes, honor societies, and more.

A photo of students at Southern Wayne High School in 1968.

Follow the links below to browse the yearbooks from the schools included in this batch:

Senior supplements published in the early 1940s are also now online, which can be seen here

These yearbooks give us fascinating insights into what life was like for high school students in Wayne County in the mid-20th century. To see more from our partner who provided these yearbooks, visit Wayne County Public Library’s partner page, or take a look at their website.


New Yearbooks from Leaksville High School in Rockingham County Now Online at DigitalNC

An exterior shot of Leaksville High School in 1947.

A new batch of several yearbooks from Rockingham County is now available on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Rockingham County Public Library. Included are six issues of The Pilot from 1937 to 1945, and four issues of The Weaver, from 1947-1952. Both titles are from Leaksville High School and these yearbooks give us a greater picture of what it meant to be a high school student in Rockingham County around that time.

These yearbooks include individual and class portraits, as well as photographs of activities, clubs, and sports teams. Some of the yearbooks also include class histories and the history of Leaksville High School. The 1937 yearbook highlights the changes since the school’s founding in 1905, and notes that the school “no longer is dependent on the janitor to ring the bells,” but instead has a “system of electric clocks, gongs, and bells.” A few of the yearbooks also include poems dedicated to the class, and “last wills and testaments,” where the graduating class would “bequeath” their skills, positions, and duties to upcoming seniors.

1947 photos of the Leaksville High annual yearbook staff (L) and the staff of The Cub Reporter school newspaper (R)

Follow the links below to browse the yearbooks included in this batch:

To see more from Rockingham County Public Library, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.


New Batch of Yearbooks from Granville County Now Online at DigitalNC

A photo of the 1962 football team at Franklinton High School.

A new batch of yearbooks from Granville County are now available on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Granville County Public Library. Included in this collection are several yearbooks from across Granville County in the 1940s and then later in the 1960s.

These yearbooks contain individual and class portraits, class and school histories, and honorifics of the students and assorted faculty members. Also included are photographs of school activities, class clubs, and student athletics. A few of the yearbooks also included “class prophecies,” descriptions of what they hoped they would be doing and how their lives would play out after graduation, and “last wills and testaments”, where they “bequeathed” their skills and abilities to future graduates.

An exterior shot of Franklinton High School, taken in 1965

Follow the links below to browse the yearbooks from the schools included in this batch:

To see more from Granville County Public Library, visit their partner page, or check out their website to learn more.


New Yearbooks from Benson Museum of Local History Now Online at DigitalNC

A group of students from Benson High School in 1968

A new batch of yearbooks from Benson, North Carolina, are now up on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Benson Museum of Local History. Included in this batch are two yearbooks from Benson High School, The Tatler from 1968 and The Tatler from 1969.

These yearbooks show what it was like to go to school in Benson at that time. These yearbooks include individual portraits, class portraits, and photographs of activities, student clubs and organizations like Future Farmers of America, and sports that the students participated in. They also include photographs celebrating the years’ homecoming events, and faculty at the school, including librarians and the school’s bus drivers.

A colored photo of Benson High School Principal Robert D. Warren speaking to the Senior Class of 1969.

To see other materials from the Benson Museum of Local History, please visit their partner page. To learn more about the museum, visit their home page.


Over 60 Years of Gaston College Catalogs Now Online at DigitalNC

Over 60 years and dozens of catalogs from Gaston College are now online at DigitalNC. The publications span over six decades, from 1955 to 2018. Founded in 1952, the institution was originally called Gaston Technical Institute. Run under the banner of the School of Engineering at North Carolina State College (which changed its name to NC State University in 1962), the school was later renamed to Gaston College in 1964. These catalogs cover admissions, student registration for classes, scheduling, financial aid information, and lists of programs and classes.

Because of Gastonia’s focus on industrial development and the importance of the textile industry to the area, it is no surprise that many of the classes at Gaston College originally reflected that. In the beginning, it was almost exclusively classes on civil engineering, chemical engineering, electrical and electronic engineering, and mechanic and industrial engineering. It also included a curriculum for pre-textiles, which would have assisted in the study of textile chemistry, knitting technology, and textiles technology. In 1970, taking such a program would have cost you $32 to be a full time student.

Click here to browse through the catalogs. To learn more about Gaston College, visit their partner page or take a look at their website.


More Newspapers From Pine Knoll Shores Now Online Through 2017

A few of Pine Knoll Shores residents and the fish they caught.

An article notifying PKS residents of turtle season and the turtles that have returned to the area

Issues of the Pine Knoll Shores newspaper, The Shoreline, from January to December 2017, are now online at DigitalNC, courtesy of the History Committee of the Town of Pine Knoll Shores. These new issues join over four decades of The Shoreline that have been added to DigitalNC over the last few years.

The Shoreline is a monthly newspaper that covers different parts of life in the Pine Knoll Shores area, including articles on community events and groups like the local Women’s Club or Garden Club, stories about the local businesses, news from the mayor and local county commissioners meetings, and book reviews. It also includes tips and helpful advice for locals, such as investment information, and in one issue, advice on how to prepare a prime rib roast for the summer. Another article offered a list of activities around the area, including special programs at the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores.

Having these issues in our collection gives us a greater picture of what it means to live in a small coastal community. Click here to view nearly 40 years of The Shoreline. To learn more about the History Committee of the Town of Pine Knoll Shores, take a look at their partner page, or website.


Dunbar High School Yearbooks from Rowan Public Library are now online

An exterior photo of Dunbar High School in 1965.

Nearly twenty years of yearbooks from Rowan County have now been digitized and are available on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner Rowan Public Library. The yearbooks cover 1950 through 1969, come from Dunbar High School, the town’s black high school, making them the first yearbooks digitized from the town of East Spencer, N.C.  Originally named the East Spencer Negro School, which opened in 1900, the school changed its name to Dunbar High School in 1958.  

These yearbooks include individual portraits, class portraits, and photographs of activities, clubs the students joined, and sports played. Some of the class portraits also included “ambitions” – jobs that the students wanted to be when they grew up, like stenographer, teacher, or social worker. A few of the yearbooks also include “last wills and testaments”, where classes would “bequeath” thanks or seats to future seniors, and “class prophecies”, where students imagined and wrote about where they might be in the future.

The Hi-Y club of 1959 at Dunbar High School.

Follow the links below to browse the various yearbooks from Dunbar High School included in this batch:

These yearbooks provide a valuable source of knowledge for what segregated school life in East Spencer, N.C. were like at that time. To learn more about the Rowan Public Library, visit their contributor page, or their website. You can also visit their website for the Edith M. Clark History Room. To see more yearbooks from across North Carolina, you can click here.


New Materials from the United Daughters of the Confederacy Now Online at DigitalNC

1902 application for Mrs. Edgar Smith to join the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Nearly two dozen new folders and notebooks have been added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Braswell Memorial Library. Coming from the United Daughters of the Confederacy, the North Carolina Division, Bethel Heroes Chapter, this new batch contains group applications, membership petitions, and meeting minutes dating back to 1902. While most of them belong to the specific Bethel Heroes chapter in Rocky Mount, there are some applications from other states like Florida. This batch is massive, with materials stretching throughout nearly the entire twentieth century, from 1902 to 1994.

These notebooks and folders give us a good idea of what it meant to be a member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy at that time. It is so important for us to archive this material so that we’re able to figure out what their members found important and noteworthy. The collection of meeting minutes can be found here, and the membership petitions are found here.

To see more from Braswell Memorial Library, you can visit their partner page, or click on their website to learn more information.


New Photographs, Documents, Scrapbooks, and More from Kings Mountain Historical Museum

A photograph of the World War II Memorial Honor Roll in Kings Mountain, NC. Established by LIONS International.

Over a dozen new documents, photographs, scrapbooks, and artifacts have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Kings Mountain Historical Museum.

One scrapbook celebrates the centennial celebration of Kings Mountain in 1974. Including photos of people dressed in vintage costumes, newspaper clippings, event flyers, and other items, this scrapbook serves as a permanent commemoration. There is also a series of scrapbooks about the family of Jacob S. Mauney, one of the pioneers of Kings Mountain. These scrapbooks were compiled between the 1950s and 1990s, with the family bringing together their history through newspaper clippings, papers, photographs, and other ephemera.

A postcard from France in 1919. The photo is of the 1st Division Band playing at the Argonne Cemetery.

One box we received contains photographs from 1917-1943 of all kinds. One collection has a series of photographic postcards from the Argonne Cemetery in France in 1919, while there are other individual photographs, including a photo of the World War II Memorial Honor Roll in Kings Mountain. There are photographs of Schofield Barracks in Hawaii, a photo of the Central Graded School in Kings Mountain, and more.

We also received a number of books and booklets, the majority from the first half of the 20th century. One booklet is a soldier’s account of traveling in battle during World War I throughout France and Germany, while another is his record ledger of soldiers, his meals, and more recorded from 1923-1925. Another booklet is a history of the Battle of Kings Mountain fought in 1780, and there is a booklet celebrating the 50th anniversary of the First National Bank of Kings Mountain.

The entire list of items can be found below:

To see more materials from the Kings Mountain Historical Museum, you can visit their partner page, or click on their website to learn more.


Even more additions to the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection Now Online

New additions to the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection, provided by our partner, Durham County Library, are now online at DigitalNC. This collection of funeral programs and obituaries of African American residents of Durham was compiled by R. Kelly Bryant (1917-2015), a historian with an extensive knowledge of Durham, North Carolina.

The collection is arranged alphabetically by the last names of individuals. Names included in the newest addition cover the surnames Mabry through Quiett. The funeral programs and obituaries are an excellent genealogical source and often include biographical details like birth and death dates, names of family members, locations lived, and aspects of an individual’s life story. We will continue to digitize this collection, so please check back for more entries in the coming months.

To take a look at what we have digitized so far of the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection, please visit the collection’s exhibit page. Information about the collection is also available in the finding aid on Durham County Library’s website.

To see more materials from Durham County Library, visit their DigitalNC partner page, or take a look at their website.