Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries by Spencer Bevis


1924 Cookbook from Davie County Public Library Now Online at DigitalNC!

A 1924 cookbook from Farmington, North Carolina has been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Davie County Public Library.

Sample recipes inside the cookbook for chicken and potato salad

Compiled and published in 1924 by the Ladies Aid Society of Farmington, this cookbook includes recipes and “tested receipts” for a wide variety of dishes, including soups, seafood, meats and appropriate sauces, breads, salads, sandwiches, desserts, drinks, cakes, and more. Some of the recipes included in the photo on the right are for chicken salad and potato salad, as well as their appropriate seasonings. It also includes “miscellaneous” advice on how to prepare and preserve eggs and how to cure meat, as well as unusual home remedies for coughs (sulfur), burns (turpentine), and chapped hands (melted soap and bran). We can’t attest to whether these home remedies work or not!  

This cookbook represents a valuable new addition to our knowledge about Davie County in the early 20th century, as well as the knowledge women were passing around during the 1920s. To see more materials from Davie County Public Library, visit their contributor page or visit their website.


Maps, Sketches, and Blueprints on DigitalNC from our new partner Wrightsville Beach Museum of History

A blueprint of the North Shore of Wrightsville Beach, with buildings, pipes, and pump stations marked in red.

Over four dozen historical maps, blueprints, and more have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our new partner, the Wrightsville Beach Museum of History. These maps, some dating back to as early as 1923, cover many different parts of the Wilmington and Wrightsville Beach areas and really illustrate to us how wide and varied the geography of New Hanover County really is.

Many of the blueprints detail buildings around Wrightsville Beach, while others show plots of land and city streets. Several of the maps are designed to show specific buildings and building sites, such as the former Babies Hospital at Mott’s Creek in Wilmington. Others are geological cross sections, showing tide lines, jetty locations, and inlets along the coast. These are invaluable blueprints for tracking the coastline, as well as illustrating how the beaches and the towns around them have changed over time.

A photo taken during the mid-scanning process of one of the larger, composited maps of Wrightsville Beach

Many of these maps are massive, with some stretching to nearly 6 feet in length. A few of the aerial shots of Wrightsville Beach were even longer, requiring a small team to handle the map just to make sure it could be documented. As a result, it was a slow process for us to roll out these maps and blueprints, scan them using our overhead camera, composite them into complete shots, and prepare them for production. We have posted an instructional video on our Flickr page to show and explain how we scanned them. Many of them, including the aerial view of Wrightsville Beach, took 3 and sometimes 4 individual shots to stitch together, resulting in images that were sometimes over 8000 pixels high and over 10000 pixels wide.

A portion of a 1956 map from the A.S.C.S. showing Moore Inlet and Mason Inlet.

These maps were in excellent condition, and we are honored in being able to digitize them and host them for everyone to see. To learn more about the Wrightsville Beach Museum of History, please visit their contributor page or their website.


1962 Pep-Pac from Henderson, NC now on DigitalNC

The 1962 Henderson High School Band

A new yearbook from Henderson, North Carolina, is now available on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Perry Memorial Library, the 1962 Pep Pac yearbook from Henderson High School for the 1961-1962 school year.

An exterior shot of Henderson High School

This yearbook contains individual and class portraits, the school’s alma mater poem and fight song, senior superlatives, and the class poem. Also included are photographs of student activities, class clubs, and student athletics.

The yearbook also includes a “class prophecy”, descriptions of what they hoped they would be doing and how their lives would play out after graduation, and the “last will and testament”, where they “left behind” their skills, abilities, and different items to the underclassmen and future graduates.

This yearbook gives us a valuable window into what life was like as a high schooler in the early 60’s. To see more from Perry Memorial Library, visit their partner page or check out their website to learn more.


New Images from Central Carolina Community College Now Online at DigitalNC

Nearly 75 new photographs have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, Central Carolina Community College.

A photo of CCCC students working in the Guided Studies Building

This new batch comes in five collections. The first contains photos of students and staff lining up and working at the bookstore on campus in the 1960s and 1970s, back when it was still called Central Carolina Technical Institute. The second collection contains around two dozen photos from 1984 of Budd Memorial Court and Budd Hall on the Lee County campus of CCCC. The third collection focuses on the Dennis A. Wicker Civic Center at the Lee County campus, with nearly two dozen photos of students or shots of the building from the 1990s. The fourth contains photos of the Classroom and Fitness Center on the Lee County campus, featuring students and campus views. Finally, the fifth features images of the Guided Studies Building on the Lee County Campus.

A shot of the Dennis A. Wicker Civic Center on the Lee County CCCC Campus.

These photos bring yet more knowledge and representation about what it meant to be a student at CCCC throughout the 20th century. To learn more about Central Carolina Community College, please visit their contributor page or check out their website.


Sketches of the Battle of Kings Mountain and More Now Online

A sketch of the Battle of Kings Mountain, drawn by Kathryn L. Bolin.

New photographs and sketches of Kings Mountain have now been digitized and uploaded to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Kings Mountain Historical Museum. These tin type photos are of men, women and children, and are likely quite old. These sketches, however, were created by Kathryn L. Bolin, and depict militiamen and soldiers at the Battle of Kings Mountain. These sketches were designed for the Mural of Battle of Kings Mountain in the Kings Mountain City Hall.

These sketches in particular join the collection of materials on the Battle of Kings Mountain we have already digitized on DigitalNC. In our holdings, we have photographs of the bicentennial celebration of the Battle, materials like programs from that celebration, histories of Kings Mountain, and more.

Having these materials in our collection helps complete our understanding of the Battle of Kings Mountain, as well as how we remember it. To see more from the Kings Mountain Historical Museum, check out their contributor page here, or click here to visit their website.


Nashville Business and Professional Women’s Club Scrapbooks Now Online at DigitalNC

Nearly a dozen new scrapbooks from the Nashville Business and Professional Women’s Club are now digitized and online at DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Harold D. Cooley Library in Nashville, NC.

A 1981 clipping from the Nashville Graphic about the Nashville BPW setting up for the Stonewall Christmas Open House.

One clipping advertising the Nashville Opry, put on by the Nashville BPW, featuring an Elvis impersonator Tim Bunn.

Chartered in 1921, the National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs was designed to promote the professional and business interests of women, extend professional opportunities to women, “elevate the standards for women”, and more. This batch includes the articles and bylaws of incorporation for the BPW Club, as well as over 12 years of scrapbooks for the group. Inside these scrapbooks are documents, photos of members and of state conventions and functions, newspaper clippings about local events, and newsletters all about the clubs and its members.

 

Having this material on our website is crucial to preserving information about social clubs and increasing representation online. To see more materials from Harold D. Cooley Library, please check out their contributor page or visit their website.


Nine new scrapbooks covering 1920-1974 from High Point Heritage Research Center now on DigitalNC

Nine new scrapbooks from High Point have been digitized and are now available at DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library. These scrapbooks are from throughout the 20th century, with a few dating from 1920-1940, while others date from 1963-1974. They join previously digitized collections, dating back to 1952.

Clippings from a 1967 issue of the Greensboro Daily News, where a new Anheuser-Busch brewery was to be built in Jamestown

These scrapbooks contain newspaper clippings from the High Point Enterprise and the Greensboro Daily News, arranged in chronological order. In many cases, articles were pasted and taped into the scrapbooks overlapping each other, so digitizing these required taking multiple images of each page. Some of the scrapbooks also contained handwritten indexes in the front for easy navigation. Many of the newspaper clippings related to local events in High Point and Greensboro. For example, one page contained articles about the selection of police officers in High Point, city employees attending a safety meeting, changes made to the High Point City Hall offices, and more. Other events covered included political events and local races, and decisions about town planning. Every so often, national and international events are also included.

To learn more from the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library, please visit their partner page, or check out their website.


Maps, Sketches, and Blueprints from Chapel Hill Historical Society Now Online at DigitalNC

A portion of one map of Carrboro and Chapel Hill – showing Franklin St, Main St, and Greensboro St.

Nearly three dozen maps and blueprints have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Chapel Hill Historical Society. Dating from 1929 to 1963, these maps really illustrate how much the city of Chapel Hill has changed in the last century.

Blueprint of the west side of Dr. J.B. Bullitt’s house in Chapel Hill.

This new batch contains many different types of maps and blueprints, including cross sections of the Chapel Hill Municipal Building, a survey of East Rosemary Street, cross sections of local doctor J.B. Bullitt’s home, and Planning Board maps of the Chapel Hill and Carrboro region. Also included are maps for proposed developments of segregated cemeteries, which would have been established next to NC state highway 54. These maps are fascinating to see and compare to what we know of the area today, and to see how much has changed since these maps were created.

These maps are very large, with some stretching out to be over 6 feet in length! While most could be scanned with our overhead PhaseOne camera (our process is documented on video here), several were so large that they had to be framed in a vacuum-sealed rotating container so that they can be preserved in the highest quality. Some of these largest ones took two different shots to compose together, resulting in images that were 7000 pixels tall by 11000 pixels wide. That’s far larger than anything even the most high-tech cell phone cameras can shoot.

One of the maps being scanned inside a vacuum-sealed container for maximum quality

Having these maps and blueprints in our collection is very important, as it helps us understand the changes to the city which DigitalNC calls home. To see more from the Chapel Hill Historical Society, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.


More additions to the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection Now Online at DigitalNC

More additions to the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection, provided by our partner, the Durham County Library, are now online at DigitalNC. This collection of funeral programs and obituaries of African American residents of Durham was compiled by R. Kelly Bryant (1917-2015), a historian with an extensive knowledge of Durham, North Carolina.

This collection is arranged alphabetically by the last names of the individuals included. Names included in the newest addition cover the surnames Raines through Sykes. The funeral programs are an excellent source for genealogical research, and often include details such as birth and death dates, names of family members, locations lived, and parts of an individual’s life story. We are always in the process of digitizing this collection, so please check back for more entries in the coming months.

To take a look at what we have digitized so far from the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection, please visit the collection’s exhibit page. Information about the collection is also available in the finding aid on Durham County Library’s website.

To see more materials from Durham County Library, visit their DigitalNC partner page, or take a look at their website.


Over 400 more issues of the Charlotte Post Now Available on DigitalNC

The front page for the Charlotte Post in April 1984, with a huge variety of topics on display

More issues of the Charlotte Post, from January 1980 to December 1987, are now online at DigitalNC, courtesy of Johnson C. Smith University. This new batch of over 420 issues joins an additional 400 issues of the Charlotte Post that stretches from 1971 into 1996. Founded in 1878 as a weekly publication, it is still published today and services the residents of Charlotte as “The Voice of the Black Community.”

Looking through these papers, it is easy to see why the Charlotte Post has become such an enduring institution. In nearly every paper, the Post covers local politics, national news, local events of note and more. For example, on the front page of the April 1984 paper shown above, there are articles on a new City-County Government Center to be constructed, travel records for highway patrol officials, holiday plans for local churches, an interview with the 1984 Delta Sigma Theta sorority debutante, and more.

An article in July 1987 highlighting the number of black candidates running for office that fall.

This new batch gives us a more complete picture of the important issues that the Charlotte Post has covered in the past as an important fixture for Charlotte’s minority community. To learn more about Johnson C. Smith University, visit their partner page or their website.