Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries tagged "local histories"


Materials dating back to 1876 now online from Union County Public Library

In a new batch of items from partner Union County Public Library, which they digitized themselves, there are materials that date all the way back to 1876.  A catalog for Monroe High School from 1876 details all the classes one could take at the school, which was a white, private, co-educational school that advertised not only to those who lived in Monroe, but in the surrounding area, including South Carolina.  In the first section of the book it lists the enrollment at the school and hometowns of each student.  The cost for 20 weeks at the school was $10-$16 tuition plus $50 for room and board.  page listing the students enrolled at Monroe High School

Other materials from this batch include several Chamber of Commerce publications promoting Monroe, NC, a feature on the new library in Monroe, and the minutes of the Union County Medical Association from 1902 to 1922.  The Medical Association minutes are particularly interesting in mentioning about a black doctor, Dr. J.S. Massey, being a member in 1903 in what was otherwise an all white organization.  This would have been during a time of increasing segregation and aggression by whites against black in North Carolina following the Plessy vs. Ferguson decision and the 1898 race riots in Wilmington and the shift in the government in 1900 to a white supremacist Democratic leadership. 

There is also a yearbook from 1954 from Union High School that was located in Lanes Creek Township.  

To view more materials from Union County Public Library, visit their partner page.  


Additional Photographs Showcasing Edgecombe County’s Historic Architecture Online Now

A newly digitized batch of photographs of historic homes and structures in Edgecombe County has been added to our website, courtesy of our partner, the Edgecombe County Memorial Library. Follow this link see the previously published batch of photos and this link to see the blog post about the previous batch of photographs.

One of the houses exhibited in these photographs is the Hart House, built by William A. Hart, a well-known Edgecombe County businessman and farmer, in 1909. This home is a rare example of a columned house in the Neo-Classical style in Tarboro.

The M. A. Hart House, located at 1109 Main St. in Tarboro, N.C.

Another house that can be seen in the batch of photographs is the J. J. Green House. This two-story home with its blend of Queen Anne and Neo-Classical architectural themes was built around 1900 by Rocky Mount architect John C. Stout, the cashier of the Bank of Tarboro.

A photograph of the J. J. Green House, located at 800 Main St. in Tarboro, N.C.

For more about the Edgecombe County Memorial Library, visit their partner page or check out their website.


Several Wayne County Boy’s Club Scrapbooks are now live!

Several scrapbooks from the Wayne County Boy’s Club have been added to our website, courtesy of our partner the Wayne County Public Library. These scrapbooks include histories of the club, photos, newspaper clippings, and other memorabilia from or related to the Wayne County Boy’s Club. They roughly span the years of 1946-1980.  The scrapbook from 1974-1975 focuses on the integration of the Boys Club in Goldsboro, when the EA House and Paley units of the club combined.  

The cover of the Boy’s Club Scrapbook containing materials from the period between 1946-1959.

In addition to these scrapbooks, this batch also includes the program from the Eastern North Carolina Drama Festival, which was held at Goldsboro High School on March 27-29, 1947.

For more information on the Wayne County Public Library, please visit their website.


New Editions of The Grier Script, Gastonia High School Newspaper, Now Online!

Thanks to our partner, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, new editions of The Grier Script are now on DigitalNC. These are a recent acquisition by the North Carolina Collection Gallery as part of the Lew Powell Collection. The Grier Script was the student newspaper of the W.P. Grier Jr. High School in Gastonia. The available issues span the years 1968-1972 and the year 1981.

The cover of the Volume III, No. 2 issue of the Grier Script, from December 1, 1969.

The Grier Script reported the events and news stories from the school for its students and staff.

The cover of the Volume XVI, No. 3 issue of the Grier Script, from April 1, 1972.

 

For more information about the North Carolina Collection, visit the North Carolina Collection website. You can also see other materials we’ve digitized for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on their contributor page. On their own digital collections page you can also view a selection of items from the Lew Powell collection.


Bennett College’s Home Economics Institute materials now online

Bennett College has shared with us a collection that covers more than 100 years of their school activities, with a particular focus on the Home Economics program at the school and the yearly institute hosted by the school on varying topics related to Home Economics. Among the collection are institutional records, numerous booklets related to home economics research, event programs, obituaries, flyers, newsletters, and photos of faculty, students, and community members. There are also newspaper clippings and magazines that relate to happenings at Bennett related to educational enrichment and fashion.

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Bennett College Home Economics Students, circa 1900.

 

A highlight of the collection are photographs from a political rally in support of Shirley Chisholm.

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Students at rally for Shirley Chisholm

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Shirley Chisholm, 1972

The African American all women college of Bennett is located in Greensboro, N.C. Bennett is filled with a rich tradition and historic legacy that will never be surpassed, we are proud to partner with them and to help preserve their heritage. To learn more about the Bennett College collections click here.

Newsletter

Gittens / Ward Home Economics Club Newsletter, September 17, 1988

 

 


Flooded: Oral Histories Documenting Hurricane Floyd Now Online

Flooded book cover with a color image of a mailbox surrounded by water

We’ve recently worked with Braswell Memorial Library (Rocky Mount, N.C.) to digitize oral histories, written stories, and a manuscript all created for the book Flooded: Reflections of Hurricane Floyd. Compiled by the Friends of Braswell Library, Flooded represents the culmination of an effort to document what happened in Nash and Edgecombe counties twenty years ago today. On September 16, 1999 Hurricane Floyd hit North Carolina and caused catastrophic flooding throughout the eastern part of the state. Fatalities, displaced families, and property loss marked its passing.

The collection includes interviews with and stories from firefighters and other emergency personnel, city officials, and residents. Many of the interviews include both audio and a transcript. You will also find the original copies of stories included within Flooded, as well as a pre-print version of the book.

Thanks to Braswell Memorial Library and its Friends group for bringing this collection for digitization. Explore the entire Flooded collection or all of the materials we’ve digitized for Braswell Memorial Library.

 


Additional Oral Histories from Hmong Keeb Kwm: Hmong Heritage Project Now Online at DigitalNC

Chia Yang shows a pillow from her home in Vietnam during oral history interview.

Chia Yang displaying a pillow during an oral history interview.

Nearly a dozen oral histories from Hmong Keeb Kwm: The Hmong Heritage Project are now online, courtesy of our partner, the Catawba County Library. The project, designed to preserve the local histories of the Hmong people living in North Carolina, yielded over a hundred digitized materials and oral histories, which we are privileged to host online. This batch oral histories represent the second half of the Hmong Keeb Kwm materials already hosted on DigitalNC.

Throughout the spring and summer of 2018, several Hmong community members came forward and volunteered their stories in order to preserve the story of how they came to Catawba County and North Carolina. The people interviewed often tell their life stories, how they came to the United States, and how they are involved in the local Hmong community. Many also include their experiences during the Vietnam War.

Please note that many of these oral histories are not in English. However, transcriptions in English are available to download. First, navigate to the bottom of the video’s page, then click the “Download” button, then “Download” under “Action”.

Having these oral histories digitized on DigitalNC represents an important part of our understanding of Catawba County and its residents. To see other materials from the Catawba County Library, visit their partner page or check out their website. To learn more about Hmong Keeb Kwm: The Hmong Heritage Project, please take a look at the exhibit page.


New partner on DigitalNC, Wachovia Historical Society

newspaper clipping of black and white photo of moravian church behind trees

An exterior photo of the Moravian Church in (at the time) Salem, North Carolina, built in 1800.

Several new scrapbooks have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our first-time partner, the Wachovia Historical Society. These four scrapbooks are the first batch from Wachovia.

Dating from 1836 to 1941, these scrapbooks contain newspaper clippings, typed letters, photographs, church programs, manuscripts, and more, that relate to the Wachovia Historical Society and the Moravian Church in the local area. Many include information on the history of Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, and important figures in the community.

The scrapbooks also each include typed and handwritten indexes in the front. They provide a valuable look into what Moravian Church members and those who lived in the Wachovia area found important and worthy of preserving in scrapbooks.

This batch of scrapbooks represents the first materials on DigitalNC to come from the Wachovia Historical Society and we are privileged to have them as a contributing partner. To see more from Wachovia Historical Society, click here to visit their partner page or check out their website


Mid-Century Newspaper Clippings Now On DigitalNC Courtesy of Partner Duplin County Library

black and white photo of wood and metal building debris

A photo showing damage to a tobacco warehouse in Wallace, North Carolina after Hurricane Hazel

A new batch of newspaper clippings and articles that tell the story of Duplin County are now available on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Duplin County Library. This is the first material of its kind that they have donated and we are privileged to have it.

black and white newspaper clipping of four individuals sawing through a tree trunk

A 1951 photo of Duplin County Rev. L.C. Prater sawing timber that would go to rebuilding the local Universalist Church.

Included in this collection are clippings from the Duplin Times from 1949-1962, clippings from the Raleigh News & Observer from 1950-1965, and clippings from the Wallace Enterprise from 1953-1964. Many of these assorted clippings focus on Duplin County activities, highlighting important figures of the community, the goings-on at local schools, and what regular people were doing in Duplin County in the middle of the 20th century. There are other articles included here, as well. One of the articles from the Duplin Times also includes a transcribed letter from General Sherman in March 1865, and the clippings from the Raleigh News & Observer include profiles about the life of Dr. John Atkinson Ferrell, a doctor who fought the spread of hookworm in North Carolina.

This is the first material of its kind from the Duplin County Library, and it is a valuable addition to DigitalNC. To learn more from the Duplin County Library, please take a look at their partner page or visit their website.


Newly Digitized Photos Reveal the Historic Architecture of Edgecombe County

Hundreds of photographs, documents, and other materials have been newly digitized at DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Edgecombe County Memorial Library. This batch covers over a hundred historic homes and buildings throughout Edgecombe County and Tarboro.

An undated photo of The Barracks, a historic 19th century home in Edgecombe County.

Encompassing over a hundred locations dating from the 18th to the 20th century, this batch highlights many of the historic homes, buildings, bridges, and more found throughout Edgecombe County. Every folder found within this batch contains something different about a different house, and includes a depth of knowledge about Edgecombe County history hardly found elsewhere. For example, one folder photographs of and information about the Whitney Bridgers House that highlights its architecture style from several angles and history.

An undated postcard photo of Bracebridge Hall, known for its “architectural excellence”

Many of the other folders contain other documentation and detail topics like the specific house’s ownership history. For example, the folder for the Bynum-Sugg House has material relating to its historic preservation and need for restoration in the late 20th century. The folder for the famous Bracebridge Hall highlights how it was the 19th century home for North Carolina Governor Elias Carr in Edgecombe County, including information about its construction, design, and the stories behind certain specific rooms. Many of the folders in this batch contain both black-and-white and color photographs of the houses, as well as interior and exterior shots.

A photo of the historic marker at Peacocks Bridge in Stantonsburg, N.C.

This batch also contains photos, materials and information about other important locations besides just homes, too. A few postcards are included, like a 1909 postcard of the Baptist Church in Wilson, North Carolina. Other assorted photos are included, such as a photo of the 8th grade class from Charles L. Coon High School in 1923. There is also a photo of the historic marker placed beside Peacocks Bridge in Stantonsburg, North Carolina, as well as a brief history of its importance.

This batch introduces a wealth of knowledge about historic homes and important places in Edgecombe County, and is invaluable to our collection. To see more from the Edgecombe County Memorial Library, visit their partner page or check out their website.