Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries tagged "campuspublications"


Ten More Years of The Guilfordian Now Online at DigitalNC

A 2007 article highlighting an exhibition at Guilford College of Ethiopian artist Wosene Worke Kosrof

A new batch of student newspapers have been added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, Guilford College. Included in this collection are nearly 250 issues of The Guilfordian, the student newspaper designed to update, teach, and inform students at Guilford College. Stretching from September of 2005 to May of 2015, this collection represents adding the experiences of nearly 3 generations of college students to our holdings.

A list of what was being played by student radio station WQFS during the week of April 10, 2009.

The Guilfordian is mostly dedicated to student activity on campus, advertising clubs, events, or speakers coming to Guilford College, it also included other details that students, alumni, or readers may find interesting. For example, as you can see to the left, for several years, the paper included lists of the top tracks played by Guilford College’s own student-run radio station, WQFS 90.9.

While many of the earlier articles are dedicated to student news, news around Greensboro, and activities on campus, readers can see how the direction and editorial stance of the paper changed with each generation of students. Over time, The Guilfordian has developed a stance more towards individual empowerment and highlighting student growth on campus. Just as the paper changed, adding or removing different sections, it is fascinating to see how the student body changed and reacted to different events over the years. For example, as seen below, The Guilfordian covered how Guilford College students demonstrated in Occupy Greensboro in the fall of 2011.

Guilford College students took to the streets in Occupy Greensboro in fall 2011.

To see more issues of The Guilfordian, click here. To learn more from Guilford College, you can see more information by visiting their partner page or taking a look at their website.


Over 60 Years of Gaston College Catalogs Now Online at DigitalNC

Over 60 years and dozens of catalogs from Gaston College are now online at DigitalNC. The publications span over six decades, from 1955 to 2018. Founded in 1952, the institution was originally called Gaston Technical Institute. Run under the banner of the School of Engineering at North Carolina State College (which changed its name to NC State University in 1962), the school was later renamed to Gaston College in 1964. These catalogs cover admissions, student registration for classes, scheduling, financial aid information, and lists of programs and classes.

Because of Gastonia’s focus on industrial development and the importance of the textile industry to the area, it is no surprise that many of the classes at Gaston College originally reflected that. In the beginning, it was almost exclusively classes on civil engineering, chemical engineering, electrical and electronic engineering, and mechanic and industrial engineering. It also included a curriculum for pre-textiles, which would have assisted in the study of textile chemistry, knitting technology, and textiles technology. In 1970, taking such a program would have cost you $32 to be a full time student.

Click here to browse through the catalogs. To learn more about Gaston College, visit their partner page or take a look at their website.


Newsletters from Richmond Community College Now Available on DigitalNC

Two new scanned documents from Richmond Community College are now available on DigitalNC. These newly digitized documents are a 1984 newsletter to celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the college, and the 1985 Spring Quarter Schedule for the school, at the time named Richmond Technical College.

The 1984 booklet celebrated the 20th anniversary of Richmond Technical College. In April 1984, a four-day-long Open House was held at the RTC campus, with entertainment, displays from local businesses and industries, demonstrations of RTC’s computer systems, and North Carolina Governor Robert Scott speaking as president of the NC Community College System. It also acted as an informational booklet, including which classes would be offered the following year, which degrees and curricula were offered at the school at the time, and new equipment the campus had received.

The 1985 Spring schedule also contained news and information on campus activities, tuition, and dates and times for classes. One of the programs they advertised was their computer-aided graphic design curriculum, where students could “print a picture of Einstein”, then “command the computer to reverse the image.” (see right) At the time, it cost a resident of North Carolina $51 for a full-time student’s tuition.

To learn more information about Richmond Community College, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.


New Batch of Course Catalogs from Johnson C. Smith University

Image from the cover of the 2006-2007 JCSU catalog.

Cover of the 1994-1995 JCSU catalog.

A new batch of catalogs from Johnson C. Smith University is now available on DigitalNC. Johnson C. Smith University is a historically black four-year research university located in Charlotte, North Carolina. It was established in 1867 as Biddle Memorial Institute but changed its name to Biddle University in 1876, and to Johnson C. Smith University in 1923. Currently JCSU serves over 1,600 students and offers 24 different undergraduate degree programs and a graduate Master of Social Work degree program.

Catalogs in this batch cover two spans of time. The first run of catalogs covers 1878-1909 when the school was Biddle University. The more recent run covers JCSU from 1964-2009. School catalogs include course offerings as well as information such as academic schedules, school history, and more. These newly digitized catalogs join previously digitized JCSU catalogs and bulletins from the 1920s-1960s.

In addition to these catalogs, make sure to take a look at other materials from JCSU including yearbooks and maps. To learn more about Johnson C. Smith University, visit their DigitalNC partner page or their website.


70 years of Mars Hill University student newspaper now online

 

A mosaic of The Hilltop mastheads used over the years spanning from 1927 to 1995.

A variety of Hilltop mastheads used over the years. Top to bottom: June 18, 1927; March 18, 1948; August 29, 1975; October 1, 1976; May 1, 1992. Left: February 2, 1995.

Seventy years of The Hilltop, Mars Hill University’s student newspaper, have been added to DigitalNC. The 924 issues were provided by our partner, Mars Hill University, and cover academic years from 1926-1995.

Mars Hill University is located in Mars Hill, a town in Madison County approximately 20 minutes north of Asheville in the mountains of western North Carolina. According to the university’s website, it is “the oldest institution of higher learning in western North Carolina on its original site.”

Image of the first building at Mars Hill College and Edward Carter who donated the land for the building from the October 27, 1934 issue of The Hilltop.

Image of the first building at Mars Hill College taken from the October 27, 1934 issue of The Hilltop.

The university is a private four-year liberal arts institution founded in 1856 by Baptist families to provide an education for their children based on the Baptist faith. While no longer directly associated with any religious organization, the university identifies as “an academic community rooted in the Christian faith.”

Article introducing the new Mars Hill College newspaper from September 25, 1926 issue.

An article introducing the new Mars Hill College newspaper from the first issue dated September 25, 1926.

First founded as the French Broad Baptist Institute, the name was not long after changed to Mars Hill College. In 2013, it became Mars Hill University to reflect the institution’s growth in enrollment and the variety of educational offerings. Students began publishing The Hilltop when the institution was still Mars Hill College. It is the official student newspaper created to cover campus news for the students, faculty, and staff.

Articles cover a wide variety of topics. The first issue from 1926 reports on campus beautification efforts, student enrollment, activities of campus organizations, the upcoming football season, and more. Faculty and staff news is also covered, with reports on new hires, retirements, and milestone events. To read these and thousands of other articles, visit and browse the Mars Hill University Student Newspaper page.

List of student newspaper staff members from the September 25, 1926 and March 30, 1995 issues of The Hilltop.

List of staff members for The Hilltop from the September 25, 1926 issue (left) and March 30, 1995 issue (right) who worked to bring news to the campus community.

The Mars Hill University yearbook, The Laurel, is also available on DigitalNC with editions from 1917-2016. For more information about these and other materials from Mars Hill University, check out their partner page or their official website.

 

 


Dozens of Cape Fear Community College Catalogs and Handbooks Now Online

Dozens of catalogs from Cape Fear Community College are now online at DigitalNC. The publications span fifty years, from 1967 to 2017. In the beginning, the institution was called Cape Fear Technical Institute, and it received its current name of Cape Fear Community College in 1988. These various catalogs cover admissions, student registration for classes, financial aid, scheduling, and the lists of programs and classes. A few of the classes offered are specific to the coastal environment, such as marine technology, boat building, commercial fishing, or marine diesel mechanics, although there are more traditional programs like business administration or criminal justice. Many of the more recent catalogs also include the student handbooks.

The Cape Fear Community College catalog for 1992-1994.

The Cape Fear Community College catalog and student handbook for 2014-2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here to browse through the catalogs. To learn more about Cape Fear Community College, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.


New scrapbooks add to the history of Central Piedmont Community College

A view of the CPCC Campus and Parking Lot, circa 1979.

CPCC brought in planetarium curator Ray Shubinski to teach an astronomy class in 1980.

A new batch of several scrapbooks containing news and goings on at Central Piedmont Community College from May 1978 to Dec 1980 are now online on DigitalNC. These scrapbooks join previously digitized ones dating back to the late 1940s that cover the founding and first few years of CPCC. Included in the new scrapbooks are newspaper clippings, newsletters, photos, and advertisements.

Looking through the scrapbooks shows us what sorts of interesting programs and events were hosted on campus at that time. For example, when PBS broadcasted Carl Sagan’s Cosmos in October 1980, CPCC brought in Ray Shubinski, the planetarium curator of the Charlotte Nature Museum (now Discovery Place), to teach an accompanying 13-week course. At the time, the course cost $10.75.

To read more about Central Piedmont Community College in the 1970s, you can browse the scrapbook collection here. To learn more about CPCC, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.


New Campus Publications from South Piedmont Community College Now Online

Over forty years worth of campus catalogs from South Piedmont Community College are now online at DigitalNC. They cover admissions, student registration for classes, financial aid, scheduling, and the lists of programs and classes.

The Anson Technical College Catalogue for 1981-1983.

These campus publications range from 1972 to 2017. In the 1970s, it was still called Anson Technical Institute, but the name was later changed to Anson Technical College in 1979 and Anson Community College in 1987. In 1999, South Piedmont Community College was created out of Anson Community College and Union Technical Education Center, in order to serve both Anson County and Union County, where the campuses still serve today. Also included is a commemorative program for Donald Altieri, who served as former President of the college from 1993-2003.

Click here to browse through the SPCC catalogs. To learn more about South Piedmont Community College, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.


Crossroads, newspaper of Belmont Abbey College digitized

Crossroads, the newspaper of Belmont Abbey College, is now digitized on DigitalNC. Courtesy of our partner Belmont Abbey College, 44 issues are available to browse beginning with the very first off the press in November 1971. This collection spans from 1971-1979 with issues published every other month.

Belmont Abbey Cathedral as seen in the July 1973 issue of Crossroads.

Belmont Abbey College lies just west of Charlotte in Belmont, North Carolina. Crossroads was established to serve its students, faculty, and administration by providing information about campus activities. It covered issues affecting the college as well as more general issues in higher education. As a Catholic and Benedictine college, the newspaper’s editorial board supported Christian values and worked to uphold “Christian ethics, good taste, and journalistic quality” (Crossroads, November 1971, p. 2).

Among the news headlines are graduations, alumni news, fundraising campaigns, appointments of new abbots, and changes on campus reflective of this decade’s larger cultural movements. The first computer came to campus in 1968 and, in 1971, Crossroads featured an article charting the college’s subsequent adoption of new technology.

Image of Belmont Abbey’s first female student as seen in the September 1972 issue of Crossroads.

Co-education became another major turning point on campuses across the nation in the 1960s and 70s. Belmont Abbey’s first female student enrolled in the fall of 1972. This decision “broke a ninety-six-year tradition,” declared a March 1972 article.

In 1973, the Belmont Abbey Cathedral became part of the National Register of Historic Places. Within its walls is found a slave block converted to a baptismal font. According to this July 1973 article, the rock is inscribed: “Upon this rock, men once were sold into slavery. Now upon this rock, through the waters of baptism, men become free children of God.”

Image of Civil War era slave block-turned baptismal font as seen in the July 1973 issue of Crossroads.

 

To read about these and many other events in the issues of Crossroads, click here. To see additional materials from our partner, Belmont Abbey College, visit their partner page.

 


Two Dozen South Piedmont Community College Insiders and More Now Online

Two dozen editions of the South Piedmont Community College Insider are now online on DigitalNC. They date back to 1998, when it was still called the Anson Community College Insider, before SPCC was created in 1999 to service both Anson and Union County.

SPCC was named one of the nation’s best community colleges in September of 2007

The Insider served as a campus newsletter for SPCC students, including articles on local events, new developments and programs that are being offered on campus, and news about campus staff, faculty, and grants. It also advertised educational help for writing term papers and assistance with using the computer labs on campus.

Employee Elizabeth Kersey received an award for Excellence in Community College Support

Also included are a few press clippings from the Anson Record and the Charlotte Observer to advertise the school’s programs and to celebrate the five-year anniversary of the creation of SPCC.

The Anson Record celebrates 5 years of SPCC

To check out more of the SPCC Insiders, they are available here and the press clippings are here. To learn more about South Piedmont Community College, visit their partner page or take a look at their website.