Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries tagged "photos"


New Materials from Rockingham County Public Library Include News Clippings, Booklets, and More

cover of an economic packet for encouraging economic investment in Madison-Mayodan, NC.

The Madison-Mayodan, N.C. Story

A new batch of materials from our partner, Rockingham County Public Library, adds scrapbooks of news clippings, books and booklets about Rockingham County History, images, and more to DigitalNC. Included are two volumes collecting “Remember When” columns from The Madison Messenger, which recount historic events from the town’s past and the “Madison-Mayodan Story” which was a packet put out by the Chamber of Commerce to encourage investment in the community in 1960.  It includes statistics about industry in the town, as well as some great photographs.  

The full batch can be seen at the links below.  

Images:

Learn more about Rockingham County Public Library by visiting their partner page or their website.  


Redevelopment and urban renewal efforts in Winston-Salem

Man on lawn mower in front of homes on Cleveland Ave. Winston Salem

Man on a lawnmower in front of homes on Cleveland Ave., 1958

Back in May, when the NCDHC staff went to Winston-Salem to do a day of on-site scanning with the Winston Salem African American Archive, the bulk of our scanning was over 200 slides that showed construction of public housing units built by the Housing Authority of Winston-Salem, as well as some slides that showed the areas of “urban decay” that were replaced with these developments in initial urban renewal efforts in the city that started in the late 1940s. The housing complexes photographed include Cleveland Avenue homes (built in the mid 1950s as one of Winston-Salem’s first public housing communities), Sunrise Towers, Crystal Towers, the 14th Street Community Center, Northwood Estates, and the Castle Heights neighborhood.

Woman walking with two children down a street past a storefront

Woman walking with two children in Winston-Salem. The slide was included in a section that stated “conditions before redevelopment”. Ca. 1950

See all the slides we scanned from the WSAAA here. To learn more about the archive, visit their website.


New partner, Graham County Public Library, brings NCDHC coverage to the western edge of NC

downtown view of Robbinsville

Main Street in Robbinsville

In June, the staff from the NC Digital Heritage Center drove over 5 hours – almost to the Tennessee border! – to spend a few days scanning on site at the Graham County Public Library.  A beautiful part of the state, we not only enjoyed meeting our new partner, seeing their collections, and even getting to sit in on a mountain music lesson at the library, but also getting to know a part of NC we don’t often get to.  The majority of materials we scanned for Graham County were photographs of the logging industry and dam building that built up the western part of the state in the early to mid 20th century and the people who built the towns that supported these operations.  

Man on a bridge in front of a dam

Man standing on a bridge near Cheoah Dam

Train hauling logs

Train hauling logs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With these scans now online, we have added a new partner and new county to DigitalNC!  To learn more about Graham County Public Library visit their partner page.  


New Photographs, Documents, Scrapbooks, and More from Kings Mountain Historical Museum

A photograph of the World War II Memorial Honor Roll in Kings Mountain, NC. Established by LIONS International.

Over a dozen new documents, photographs, scrapbooks, and artifacts have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Kings Mountain Historical Museum.

One scrapbook celebrates the centennial celebration of Kings Mountain in 1974. Including photos of people dressed in vintage costumes, newspaper clippings, event flyers, and other items, this scrapbook serves as a permanent commemoration. There is also a series of scrapbooks about the family of Jacob S. Mauney, one of the pioneers of Kings Mountain. These scrapbooks were compiled between the 1950s and 1990s, with the family bringing together their history through newspaper clippings, papers, photographs, and other ephemera.

A postcard from France in 1919. The photo is of the 1st Division Band playing at the Argonne Cemetery.

One box we received contains photographs from 1917-1943 of all kinds. One collection has a series of photographic postcards from the Argonne Cemetery in France in 1919, while there are other individual photographs, including a photo of the World War II Memorial Honor Roll in Kings Mountain. There are photographs of Schofield Barracks in Hawaii, a photo of the Central Graded School in Kings Mountain, and more.

We also received a number of books and booklets, the majority from the first half of the 20th century. One booklet is a soldier’s account of traveling in battle during World War I throughout France and Germany, while another is his record ledger of soldiers, his meals, and more recorded from 1923-1925. Another booklet is a history of the Battle of Kings Mountain fought in 1780, and there is a booklet celebrating the 50th anniversary of the First National Bank of Kings Mountain.

The entire list of items can be found below:

To see more materials from the Kings Mountain Historical Museum, you can visit their partner page, or click on their website to learn more.


See Central Carolina Community College from Above in New Photos

1997 aerial view of Central Carolina Community College’s Lee County Campus, showing construction on the Vocational Technology building (later renamed Joyner Hall)

The path between the Learning Resource Center and Wilkinson Hall on the Lee county main campus of Central Carolina Technical Institute in the snow.

A new batch of photographs from Central Carolina Community College is now available on DigitalNC. These photographs range in date from the 1960s through the 1990s and focus mainly on campus facilities. CCCC was started as Lee County Industrial Education Center in the early 1960s, but underwent name changes in 1965, 1979, and 1988 to become Central Carolina Technical Institute, then Central Carolina Technical College, and finally Central Carolina Community College. These photographs follow the school through periods of growth and change and document how campus looked through all of these stages. Particularly striking is a collection of aerial photographs that shows CCCC’s Lee County Campus from above.

This new batch of photographs joins previously digitized photos from CCCC that focus on student life and academic programs. To see more materials from our partner Central Carolina Community College, visit their DigitalNC partner page or take a look at their website.


Over 350 New Photos From The Forest History Society Now Online at DigitalNC

A 1928 plot of land carved out to be “light burned” annually

Over 350 new photos have been digitized and uploaded to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Forest History Society. Located in Durham, North Carolina, their organization is dedicated to the preservation of materials about forest history and conservation. While their mission is to promote and collect materials about forest and environmental preservation around the world, these photos are specifically about North Carolina’s history of forest and wildlife conservation.

The back of a firefighting truck

A photo of firefighters creating a firebreak, a strip of open space that slows or stops the spread of a fire

These newly digitized photographs were taken from the late 1920s to early 1940s, by various photographers for the NC Department of Conservation and Development. They include images of fire control conferences and forester’s meetings, fire lines and fire line equipment, and much more. Many of the later photographs include construction of lookout towers across the state and angles from the top of those towers. Taken in dozens of counties across the state, these photographs give us views of the state and views of firefighting that we don’t often get to see, and show us how dangerous firefighting was at that time. For example, in the photo on the right, the men creating a firebreak were dressed in suits and ties instead of fire-protective gear.

A 1940 photo of CCC Camp P-73 from the Riegel Tower in Brunswick County

To browse through these materials, visit the Forest History Society’s partner page, or check out their website.


DigitalNC Hits the Road With an On-Site Scanning Project at Johnston County Heritage Center

Abhego Atkinson Family Reunion, Beulah Township, 1912

Spicy Elizabeth Hayes Barefoot (1862-1931)

This December the Digital Heritage Center team took a field trip to Johnston County Heritage Center in Smithfield, North Carolina to do a session of on-location scanning. The Heritage Center is the former home office of First Citizens Bank in downtown Smithfield and includes exhibit space as well as storage for historic artifacts and records pertaining to Johnston County history. Armed with two flatbed scanners, laptops, external hard drives, and an armful of cords and cables, team members set to work scanning and filling out metadata for over 200 photographs that are now available on DigitalNC.

These photographs are part of Johnston county’s portrait collection depicting individuals from Johnston County and beyond. Many of the portraits from the session included labels detailing names, dates, and locations describing the photo. This information was recorded on-site during the scanning process, and makes for a useful set of images for those interested in genealogy or more broadly in Johnston County history. The number of well-labeled group family portraits in this collection make it great for tracing family history, and the Digital Heritage team enjoyed tracking individuals across different times and settings as we scanned.

Reverend Jesse and Susanna Watkins Wheeler

To learn more about on-location scanning, take a look at our previous blogpost detailing the initiative. To learn more about our partner Johnston County Heritage Center, and to see more of their materials, take a look at their DigitalNC partner page or check out their website.

 


Newly Digitized Materials About the Junaluska Community from Watauga County Public Library

A January 2014 article in WNC Magazine detailing the Junaluska community

Dozens of new documents, photos, and artifacts have been newly digitized at DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Watauga County Public Library. They all detail the Junaluska community, a neighborhood where a large number of longtime African-American families of Boone live. Many families also belong to the Mennonite Brethren Church, making it the only Mennonite Brethren church with the majority of members being African-American. Click here to view the newly digitized files.

A 2012 article in the Watauga Democrat celebrating the inaugural Junaluska Jubilee

Included in the new batch of digitized artifacts are several journal articles about the Mennonite Church in Boone, local documents, ancestral generation charts, and newspaper articles about the local community and local figures, including the pastor for the Mennonite Brethren Church. Also included are photos and advertisements for the Junaluska Jubilee, a celebration of the Junaluska community. Finally, there is also an audio clip included about the Junaluska community, including segments on segregation, the civil rights movement, and school integration, narrated by local residents.  

You can learn more about the Watauga County Public Library by visiting the contributor page on DigitalNC or by visiting the homepage. This collection is part of our effort to digitize materials related to underrepresented communities.  To learn more about our underrepresented initiative, go here.  


New scrapbooks add to the history of Central Piedmont Community College

A view of the CPCC Campus and Parking Lot, circa 1979.

CPCC brought in planetarium curator Ray Shubinski to teach an astronomy class in 1980.

A new batch of several scrapbooks containing news and goings on at Central Piedmont Community College from May 1978 to Dec 1980 are now online on DigitalNC. These scrapbooks join previously digitized ones dating back to the late 1940s that cover the founding and first few years of CPCC. Included in the new scrapbooks are newspaper clippings, newsletters, photos, and advertisements.

Looking through the scrapbooks shows us what sorts of interesting programs and events were hosted on campus at that time. For example, when PBS broadcasted Carl Sagan’s Cosmos in October 1980, CPCC brought in Ray Shubinski, the planetarium curator of the Charlotte Nature Museum (now Discovery Place), to teach an accompanying 13-week course. At the time, the course cost $10.75.

To read more about Central Piedmont Community College in the 1970s, you can browse the scrapbook collection here. To learn more about CPCC, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.


Over 100 New Photographs from Central Carolina Community College Now Online

The CCCC Etheridge High Tech building under construction

An aerial view of the Central Carolina Technical College Harnett campus

A new batch of over 130 images from Central Carolina Community College have now been added to DigitalNC. This is our seventh set of photos and it brings our exhibit A Pictorial History of Central Carolina Community College to almost 3,000 photos!

Much of this set is about the various buildings around CCCC, including the construction of the CCCC Pittsboro campus, the construction of the CCCC Etheridge High Tech building, and the planning and construction of the CCCC Harnett County campus. Also included are photos of the NC School of Telecommunications, the Harnett Correctional Institute,  and several aerial photographs taken of the CCCC Campus in Harnett County.

To learn more about Central Carolina Community College, please visit their contributor page or their website. To see more photos like this, check out A Pictorial History of Central Carolina Community College Collection and the Images of North Carolina Collection.