Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries by Ashlie Brewer


1956 to 1962 Issues of The Daily Record (Dunn, NC) Now Available

The Daily Record headline: Space Monkeys Are Back.

The Daily Record, May 28, 1959.

Article on the minimum age act in North Carolina passing in 1959. It states that NC was the first state below Pennsylvania to pass such a law.

Senate Passes Minimum Wage Act, May 7, 1959.

Thanks to support from the North Caroliniana Society and to our partner, Harnett County Public Library, new issues of The Daily Record are now available on our website. This batch expands our current collection of the paper to include 1956 to 1962. Published Monday through Friday, The Daily Record suppled Dunn and Harnett County with local and global news stories. Today, the paper continues to be published in Dunn, North Carolina.

Major headlines in this batch include Queen Elizabeth II’s visit to America, Russia’s announcement to send apes to the moon, the aftermath of America sending monkeys to space, and the establishment of a minimum wage in North Carolina.

Starting in 1945, citizens of North Carolina fought for the establishment of a minimum wage in the state. The article to the right, “14-Year Fight Ends; Action First In South,” highlights the establishment of a minimum wage by North Carolina’s General Assembly in 1959–the first state south of Pennsylvania to do so. The bill guaranteed that all workers in the state would be paid a minimum of 75 cents an hour, equivalent to about $6.88 an hour today. 

The Daily Record subscription and title information. This includes the publisher, subscription rates, and address.

To learn more about Harnett County Public Library, please click here.

To view all issues of The Daily Record, please click here.

To view more newspapers from North Carolina, please click here.

 

 

 

 


Wilkes County Oral Histories Now Available

Thanks to our partner, Wilkes Community College, 26 new oral history recordings are now available on our website.  Thanks to our colleagues in the Southern Folklife Collection, these audio materials were digitized utilizing funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Screenshot of the TIND audio player. The audio playing is titled, "Oral History Interview with Cranor Kilby."

These oral histories all pertain to the history and citizens of Wilkes County. Topics discussed in the recordings include the history of mills, silvering mirrors, personal stories and family histories, moonshining, fur trading, education, medicine and pharmaceuticals, Fort Defiance restoration, racecar drivers, musicians, and more.

One particularly interesting recording is Cranor Kilby’s interview. In it, he discusses his early life including the first time he made money performing, his favorite instruments, music in his early years, and keeping community songs alive. According to Kilby, there are several songs which seemed to have disappeared over the years. Through his performance of these songs, he keeps them alive for the next generation of North Carolinians and Wilkes County citizens. In the second half of his interview he performs several songs, including “Groundhog,” “Sadie,” and “Turkey Buzzard.” 

To learn more about Wilkes Community College, please visit their website.

To listen to more oral histories, please click here.

To view more audiovisual materials, please visit our North Carolina Sights and Sounds collection.


1941 to 1975 Transylvania Times Issues Now Available

The Transylvania Times header. Under the header reads, "A State and National Prize-Winning Newspaper."

Picture of Margaret Rice in front of a Brevard College 1853 sign. The article details how be crowned as Queen of May.

The Transylvania Times, May 3, 1956.

Thanks to our partner, Transylvania County Library, new issues of The Transylvania Times are now available on our website. This batch includes issues from the years 1941 to 1975, adding over 1,000 issues. Published weekly, the paper focuses on education updates (such as at Brevard College and high school), music camps and performances, local and national news, and community events. Featured articles and topics from this batch include the end of World War II and the fight against polio.

Present in many issues of The Transylvania Times are advertisements and articles highlighting polio—information on the disease, how to keep your household safe and sanitized, and March of Dimes fundraisers. In 1955, the poliomyelitis (polio) vaccine was made available in the United States. In the same year, the March of Dimes organization had one of its largest fundraising efforts with the hopes of raising enough money to vaccinate nine million 1st and 2nd graders throughout the United States. In the Brevard branch of the organization, citizens were encouraged to donate what they could and to donate again. The more that the community donated to the organization, the more doses of the vaccine could be created and distributed across the country. Unfortunately the Cutter Incident (where some batches of the vaccine contained live polio virus) significantly decreased the distribution and the American people’s faith in the vaccine. Eventually that faith was restored with a revamped system of regulating vaccines and development of more polio vaccines such as the Sabin oral vaccine. Twenty-four years after the release of the first vaccine, in 1979, the United States was declared polio-free.

Advertisement for a Sabin oral polio vaccine clinic in Brevard on January 12, 1964.

The Transylvania Times, January 9, 1964.

To learn more about the Transylvania County Library, please visit their website.

To view all issues of The Transylvania Times, please click here.

To view more newspapers from around North Carolina, please click here.


Rockingham County Materials Now Available

Picture of teacher Ruth Wiley. Under the photo is written: Mrs. Ruth Wiley retires from teaching, "but not from life."

Mrs. Ruth Wiley, June 19, 1985.

Thanks to our partner, Rockingham County Public Library, batches containing various materials including Madison-Mayodan High School yearbooks, newspaper clippings of school classes, a hand-written history of The Black Community Heritage of Madison, and 14 issues spanning 1947 to 1997 of Rockingham County’s magazine The Advisor are now available on our website.

One highlight from this batch is the hand-written history of The Black Community Heritage of Madison. Although the material includes history of Black individuals in Madison from around the first recorded migration (~June of 1775), it focuses more heavily on after the Civil War. The work is split up into major topics such as churches, businesses, education, and civic organizations. 

In the education section, the document traces the beginning of the Madison Public School System to Mary Black Franklin. Franklin began teaching members of the community in her home and in other various places in the community that would allow her to use the space. The number of students she taught continued to grow until the first public school was founded in a two room building. Eventually, a larger building later named the “Old Hall” was purchased to give the school more space. The school was only in operation six months out of the year. Students were allowed to attend the first three months of school for free, but parents would have to pay a tax for their children to finish the final three months. This system led to the creation of the Madison Public School System.

To learn more about the Rockingham County Public Library, please visit their website.

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.

To view more content from Rockingham County Public Library, please visit here.


Bertie County joins DigitalNC with the Windsor High School 1956 yearbook

Thanks to our newest partner, Russell’s Back in the Day Museum, Windsor High School’s 1956 yearbook is now available on our website. The yearbook includes a look at 1950’s fashion, the school’s senior statistics, advertisements for products and services, and various extracurricular groups present at the school in 1956.

As a result of our newest partnership with the museum, which is located in Bertie County, the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center now has at least one partner in 99 out of North Carolina’s 100 counties! 

Page titled "Drums of Death" there are five separate photos. One shows a group of cast members huddled together in 19th century fashion. The second shows two individuals talking to each other on stage. The third shows an individual in costume looking out into the audience, shocked. The third shows three individuals on set--two in chairs and one standing--looking at the camera. The final photo has 5 individuals, 4 sitting on a couch while one speaks on the phone.

Drums of Death, Winoca 1956.

Majorettes page in the 1956 Winoca yearbook. The first picture shows 5 high school students in majorette uniforms and with batons. The second photo shows the drum major in their uniform.

Majorettes, Winoca 1956.

From a young age, Russ Russell collected materials related to the Town of Windsor and Bertie County. After purchasing a house in Downtown Windsor, Russell made the decision to make his dream of opening a museum a reality by converting the house into Russell’s Back in the Day Museum. The museum serves as a vital cultural heritage center for the Town of Windsor and Bertie County community, with materials such as old high school yearbooks, signs from Bertie County, artifacts from old country stores, and much more. 

To learn more at Russell’s Back in the Day Museum, please visit here

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.

To view materials from different North Carolina counties, please click here.


New Wadesboro and Anson High School Yearbooks Now Available

Thanks to our partner, Anson County Historical Society, a batch containing 40 new yearbooks from Wadesboro and Anson High School are now available on our website. These yearbooks range from between 1922 to 1967.Two individuals standing at the doors of a driver education car. The car is posed to look like it has hit a sign. The caption on the image reads "Driver training students have a lot to learn."

Wadesboro High School was built in 1922. Over a span of 45 years, new structures were slowly added to the original building. These structures included a new wing in 1950, a detached cafeteria in 1953, and a gymnasium in 1961. Six years after the addition of the gymnasium, in 1967, Wadesboro High School became a middle school. 

Wadesboro HS 1936 women's basketball team. Eight women lined up in their basketball uniforms. The coach, Coach Snuggs, is on the left.

Wadesboro High School 1936 Girls’ Basketball Team

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.

To learn more about the Anson County Historical Society, please visit their website.


1951-1976 Black Mountain News Issues Now Available

Black Mountain News title

Thanks to a nomination by our partner, Swannanoa Valley Museum and History Center, 1,357 issues of Black Mountain News from 1951 to 1976 are now available to view on our website. Black Mountain News is published in Black Mountain which is located in western North Carolina in Buncombe County near Asheville. This batch of Black Mountain News issues builds on our current collection of the paper which originally spanned only from the paper’s first issue on September 6, 1945 to 1950. 

Article detailing information on the 1972 Folk Festival held at Owen High School in Black Mountain, North Carolina.

Dancing, Singing, and Clogging This Friday, March 23, 1972

Articles published in Black Mountain News center the stories, announcements, and advertisements of the Black Mountain community along with other surrounding communities such as Swannanoa. These articles provide readers with more information on Black Mountain’s community and history during the period. Featured articles include an ad for a 1955 Tupperware partyinformation on the 1972 Owen High School Folk Festival, and a call for donations from the Buncombe County community for the preservation of the U.S.S. North Carolina (which currently resides in Wilmington).

Digitization of these issues was funded in part by the North Caroliniana Society

To learn more about the Swannanoa Valley Museum and History Center, please visit their website.

To view more newspapers from around North Carolina, please visit here.


Mitchell Community College Course Catalogs Now Available

Thanks to our partner, Mitchell Community College, we have 54 new course catalogs for Mitchell Community College spanning from 1942 to 2011 available on our website—filling in previously missing years.

Chartered in 1852, Mitchell Community College began as a Presbyterian college for women with a focus on fine arts and music. It changed to a junior women’s college in 1924. In 1932, following the growing hardships caused by the Great Depression, men were allowed onto the campus. Twenty-seven years later, in 1959, another change occurred when the college became an independent community college operated by the Mitchell College Foundation. Since 1852, the college has continued to be updated with new programs, buildings, and classes to suit the changing times and various education paths of its community.

A group of students standing beside a banner that reads "Mitchell Community College; MCC."

Mitchell Community College 1987-1989 Course Catalog

To learn more about Mitchell Community College, please visit their website.

To view more of our materials from North Carolina community colleges, visit here.


Newspapers, Posters, and More Now Available from Davidson County Public Library System

Thanks to our partner, Davidson County Public Library System, three batches of various materials are now available on our website. The first batch features eleven issues of the Erlanger Community paper from 1919 to 1922; a Robbins Elementary School 1931-1932 report card; Bylaws of Hopewell Council No. 1758 Royal Arcanum; and four new brightly colored Lexington Barbeque Festival posters. Batch two includes six new issues of the South Davidson High School yearbook covering from 1948 to 1952. The final batch contains 73 issues of the Thomasville Times, as well as student newspapers from Reeds High School, Denton High School, and Lexington High School.

The Lexhipep. Published by the students of Lexington High School.

36th Annual Lexington Barbeque Festival poster. The poster features three pigs on handcar.

36th Annual Lexington Barbeque Festival Poster

35th Annual Lexington Barbeque Festival poster. The poster features two pigs dressed up as a waiter and waitress dancing. The text on the image reads: Lexington Barbeque Festival 35th Anniversary. October 27, 2018.

35th Annual Lexington Barbeque Festival Poster

The Phoenix 1953. Published by the senior class of Denton High School in Denton, NC. Included on the page is a torch and an open book with blank pages.

To learn more about the Davidson County Public Library System, please visit their website.

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.

To view more newspapers on DigitalNC, visit our North Carolina Newspapers collection. 


Montgomery Community College 50 Years of Success and Catalogs Now Available

Thanks to our new partner, Montgomery Community College, nine catalogs covering years from 1969 to 1992 and a publication that details the college’s 50 year history (1967-2017) are now available on our website.

Montgomery Community College: 50 years of Success cover. There is an image of the older campus in black and white with the newer building pictured on the bottom.

Montgomery Community College (originally the Montgomery Technical Institute) was established on September 7, 1967 in Troy, North Carolina. Due to the Montgomery County’s status of one of the most rural, least populated, and isolated counties in North Carolina the college faced tremendous challenges to get started and chartered. According to Montgomery Community College: 50 Years of Success there was a delay of several years to have the college established due to state leaders thinking it would not succeed. The citizens of Montgomery County proved them wrong. The campus currently includes facilities of approximately 134,400 square feet on 153 acres of land and over 400 enrolled students. 

Pictures of the early machine shop class with instructor Frank Lemonds and early industrial sewing class in the annex building.

To learn more about Montgomery Community College, please visit their website.