Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries tagged "yearbooks"


Rockingham County Materials Now Available

Picture of teacher Ruth Wiley. Under the photo is written: Mrs. Ruth Wiley retires from teaching, "but not from life."

Mrs. Ruth Wiley, June 19, 1985.

Thanks to our partner, Rockingham County Public Library, batches containing various materials including Madison-Mayodan High School yearbooks, newspaper clippings of school classes, a hand-written history of The Black Community Heritage of Madison, and 14 issues spanning 1947 to 1997 of Rockingham County’s magazine The Advisor are now available on our website.

One highlight from this batch is the hand-written history of The Black Community Heritage of Madison. Although the material includes history of Black individuals in Madison from around the first recorded migration (~June of 1775), it focuses more heavily on after the Civil War. The work is split up into major topics such as churches, businesses, education, and civic organizations. 

In the education section, the document traces the beginning of the Madison Public School System to Mary Black Franklin. Franklin began teaching members of the community in her home and in other various places in the community that would allow her to use the space. The number of students she taught continued to grow until the first public school was founded in a two room building. Eventually, a larger building later named the “Old Hall” was purchased to give the school more space. The school was only in operation six months out of the year. Students were allowed to attend the first three months of school for free, but parents would have to pay a tax for their children to finish the final three months. This system led to the creation of the Madison Public School System.

To learn more about the Rockingham County Public Library, please visit their website.

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.

To view more content from Rockingham County Public Library, please visit here.


Bertie County joins DigitalNC with the Windsor High School 1956 yearbook

Thanks to our newest partner, Russell’s Back in the Day Museum, Windsor High School’s 1956 yearbook is now available on our website. The yearbook includes a look at 1950’s fashion, the school’s senior statistics, advertisements for products and services, and various extracurricular groups present at the school in 1956.

As a result of our newest partnership with the museum, which is located in Bertie County, the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center now has at least one partner in 99 out of North Carolina’s 100 counties! 

Page titled "Drums of Death" there are five separate photos. One shows a group of cast members huddled together in 19th century fashion. The second shows two individuals talking to each other on stage. The third shows an individual in costume looking out into the audience, shocked. The third shows three individuals on set--two in chairs and one standing--looking at the camera. The final photo has 5 individuals, 4 sitting on a couch while one speaks on the phone.

Drums of Death, Winoca 1956.

Majorettes page in the 1956 Winoca yearbook. The first picture shows 5 high school students in majorette uniforms and with batons. The second photo shows the drum major in their uniform.

Majorettes, Winoca 1956.

From a young age, Russ Russell collected materials related to the Town of Windsor and Bertie County. After purchasing a house in Downtown Windsor, Russell made the decision to make his dream of opening a museum a reality by converting the house into Russell’s Back in the Day Museum. The museum serves as a vital cultural heritage center for the Town of Windsor and Bertie County community, with materials such as old high school yearbooks, signs from Bertie County, artifacts from old country stores, and much more. 

To learn more at Russell’s Back in the Day Museum, please visit here

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.

To view materials from different North Carolina counties, please click here.


New Wadesboro and Anson High School Yearbooks Now Available

Thanks to our partner, Anson County Historical Society, a batch containing 40 new yearbooks from Wadesboro and Anson High School are now available on our website. These yearbooks range from between 1922 to 1967.Two individuals standing at the doors of a driver education car. The car is posed to look like it has hit a sign. The caption on the image reads "Driver training students have a lot to learn."

Wadesboro High School was built in 1922. Over a span of 45 years, new structures were slowly added to the original building. These structures included a new wing in 1950, a detached cafeteria in 1953, and a gymnasium in 1961. Six years after the addition of the gymnasium, in 1967, Wadesboro High School became a middle school. 

Wadesboro HS 1936 women's basketball team. Eight women lined up in their basketball uniforms. The coach, Coach Snuggs, is on the left.

Wadesboro High School 1936 Girls’ Basketball Team

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.

To learn more about the Anson County Historical Society, please visit their website.


Several 1971 Yearbooks From Wayne County Now Available

Thanks to our partners at Wayne County Public Library, we have added 4 1971 yearbooks from 4 different high schools in Wayne County to DigitalNC. These yearbooks are:

Of note, the Goldsboro High School yearbook has several pages commenting on the second year of racial integration. While the yearbook states “…pupils, mingling with greater ease, were known more by name than color” it also noted that “the segregated stands at a basketball game show lingering misconceptions among GHS students” (images 11 and 20).

Additionally, several students from Goldsboro High School flew out to Hollywood, California to surprise Andy Griffith, a former GHS teacher, during a taping of This Is Your Life.

For a look at all 4 yearbooks, click here. To view the entire collection of DigitalNC’s high school yearbooks, click here. And to learn more about Wayne County Public Library, you can visit their home page, here.


Rowan Memorial Hospital School of Nursing Yearbooks Now On DigitalNC

DigitalNC is now home to 16 Rowan Memorial Hospital School of Nursing yearbooks thanks to our partners at Rowan Public Library. These yearbooks cover the years 1950-1971.

Rowan Memorial Hospital, where the student nurses studied and worked, is located in Salisbury, NC, right in the middle of the state. The School of Nursing opened up in 1903 and the first class graduated in 1907 (The White Cap [1950], image 14). These yearbooks, appropriately titled The White Cap, reflect on the year’s activities, from clubs to nursing courses.

To take a look at all 16 yearbooks, click here. To learn more about the Rowan Public Library, click here to be taken to their home page.

References:

Rowan Memorial Hospital School of Nursing. The White Cap [1950]. https://lib.digitalnc.org/record/237302#?c=0&m=0&s=0&cv=0&r=0&xywh=-1974%2C-1%2C7003%2C4256


Yearbooks From New Partner, P. S. Jones Alumni, Inc., Now Online

DigitalNC is happy to announce that 5 yearbooks from P.S. Jones High School have joined our digital yearbook collection courtesy of our new partners at P. S. Jones Alumni, Inc. These yearbooks span the years 1958 to 1968.

Located in Washington, NC, P.S. Jones High School was originally named Washington Colored Public School and was a Black public high school. The first iteration of Washington Colored Public School consisted of three detached structures that served primary, elementary, and high school students. Washington Colored Public School’s first class graduated in 1926. In 1950, Professor Professor Peter Simon Jones, a beloved teacher who taught at the school for 22 years, passed away. The community decided to rename the school P.S. Jones High School in his honor. The school disbanded in 1968 due to the integration of Washington City Schools (PS Jones High School Alumni). Today, P.S. Jones Middle School continues to carry the P.S. Jones name into the future. The yearbooks available on DigitalNC show the final decade of P.S. Jones High School, depicting the students, school clubs, sports teams, and more.

To view all five yearbooks, click here. To learn more about the history of P.S. Jones High School, please visit the P.S. Jones Alumni, Inc. website. Be sure to check out the virtual materials on the P. S. Jones African-American Education Museum as well!

References:

PS Jones High School Alumni. “Pave the Way” Buy a Brick. https://polarengraving.com/psjoneshighschoolalumni


Yearbooks, Newspapers, Furniture Catalogs, and more from High Point Now Online

DigitalNC is happy to announce several batches of materials from High Point, NC are now available to view online. These materials include 6 yearbooks, 4 individual newspaper issues, and 19 miscellaneous items. These batches were made available thanks to our two partners; the yearbooks are from the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library while the newspapers and miscellaneous items are from the High Point Museum.

The 6 yearbooks, the Pemican, all come from High Point Central High School, spanning the years 1966-1971.

The 4 newspapers are comprised of half school publications, half company publications. The four newspapers are:

Tomlinson News was published by the Tomlinson Manufacturing Company, a furniture manufacturer. Amco News was published by the Adams-Millis Corporation, a textile company.

The batch of miscellaneous items contains interesting memorabilia, such as a 1941 alumni record from Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina, an early 1900s reed organ instruction book, a booklet on the history of the Springfield Monthly Meeting of Friends, a Quaker group, and a pamphlet titled But Everybody’s Doing It!: High Point’s Joint Code of Social Behavior for Parents and Young People. Notably, there are many early to mid 1900s furniture catalogs from Burton, Dalton, The Continental Furniture Company, and High Point Furniture Company. From the late 1880s, High Point has been known for its furniture industry. After World War II, about 60% of all furniture made in the United States was produced within a 150-mile radius of High Point (High Point Museum, paragraph 2).

To view all the digitized materials from our two High Point partners, click here and here. For all the High Point newspapers, click here. For more information on our partners, click here to visit the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library’s website and click here to visit the High Point Museum’s website.

References:

High Point Museum. Furniture History: High Point & Furniture. https://www.highpointnc.gov/841/Furniture-History


West Mecklenburg High School Yearbook Added to DigitalNC

A 1965 yearbook from West Mecklenburg High School has just been added to our digital yearbook collection on DigitalNC. We would like to thank our partners at the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library for making this possible.

To view all yearbooks from West Mecklenburg High School, click here. To learn more about the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, visit their homepage here.


Newspapers, Posters, and More Now Available from Davidson County Public Library System

Thanks to our partner, Davidson County Public Library System, three batches of various materials are now available on our website. The first batch features eleven issues of the Erlanger Community paper from 1919 to 1922; a Robbins Elementary School 1931-1932 report card; Bylaws of Hopewell Council No. 1758 Royal Arcanum; and four new brightly colored Lexington Barbeque Festival posters. Batch two includes six new issues of the South Davidson High School yearbook covering from 1948 to 1952. The final batch contains 73 issues of the Thomasville Times, as well as student newspapers from Reeds High School, Denton High School, and Lexington High School.

The Lexhipep. Published by the students of Lexington High School.

36th Annual Lexington Barbeque Festival poster. The poster features three pigs on handcar.

36th Annual Lexington Barbeque Festival Poster

35th Annual Lexington Barbeque Festival poster. The poster features two pigs dressed up as a waiter and waitress dancing. The text on the image reads: Lexington Barbeque Festival 35th Anniversary. October 27, 2018.

35th Annual Lexington Barbeque Festival Poster

The Phoenix 1953. Published by the senior class of Denton High School in Denton, NC. Included on the page is a torch and an open book with blank pages.

To learn more about the Davidson County Public Library System, please visit their website.

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.

To view more newspapers on DigitalNC, visit our North Carolina Newspapers collection. 


Yearbooks from the North Carolina School for the Deaf Now Online

DigitalNC is happy to announce 35 yearbooks from our new partner, the North Carolina School for the Deaf. All of these yearbooks are from said school and cover years between 1915-1971.

The North Carolina School for the Deaf was founded in 1891 in Morganton, NC, located in the western part of the state. In a move to separate hearing impaired students from vision impaired students, whom all had a place under one school in Raleigh that went by the demeaning name of the North Carolina Institution for the Deaf and Dumb and the Blind, funds were established for the school at Morganton. The first brick laid for the school (with a name close to it’s sister school; the North Carolina School for the Deaf and Dumb) was by two future pupils, Maggie LeGrand and Robert C. Miller, on May 16, 1892. Doors were opened to 100 pupils on October 2, 1894. In 1907, the name officially changed to The North Carolina School for the Deaf (Class Book, images 17-18).

Funds from the state’s building program and a W.P.A. grant in the early 1940s allowed the school to construct cold storage, fencing, barns, a poultry house, playgrounds, an athletic field, as well as renovate school buildings to be properly fireproofed and ventilated (The Deaf Carolinian, image 22). Fast-forward to 1965, and the school has a large campus, with buildings both original and new.

To learn more about the history of the North Carolina School for the Deaf, please visit their website.  To view more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit the North Carolina Yearbooks page.

References:

North Carolina School for the Deaf. Class Book, Class of 1934 North Carolina School for the Deaf. https://lib.digitalnc.org/record/237179?ln=en#?c=0&m=0&s=0&cv=17&r=0&xywh=77%2C118%2C2410%2C1464

North Carolina School for the Deaf. The Deaf Carolinian. https://lib.digitalnc.org/record/237183#?c=0&m=0&s=0&cv=21&r=0&xywh=455%2C2058%2C2900%2C1762