Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries tagged "underrepresented"


Rockingham County Materials Now Available

Picture of teacher Ruth Wiley. Under the photo is written: Mrs. Ruth Wiley retires from teaching, "but not from life."

Mrs. Ruth Wiley, June 19, 1985.

Thanks to our partner, Rockingham County Public Library, batches containing various materials including Madison-Mayodan High School yearbooks, newspaper clippings of school classes, a hand-written history of The Black Community Heritage of Madison, and 14 issues spanning 1947 to 1997 of Rockingham County’s magazine The Advisor are now available on our website.

One highlight from this batch is the hand-written history of The Black Community Heritage of Madison. Although the material includes history of Black individuals in Madison from around the first recorded migration (~June of 1775), it focuses more heavily on after the Civil War. The work is split up into major topics such as churches, businesses, education, and civic organizations. 

In the education section, the document traces the beginning of the Madison Public School System to Mary Black Franklin. Franklin began teaching members of the community in her home and in other various places in the community that would allow her to use the space. The number of students she taught continued to grow until the first public school was founded in a two room building. Eventually, a larger building later named the “Old Hall” was purchased to give the school more space. The school was only in operation six months out of the year. Students were allowed to attend the first three months of school for free, but parents would have to pay a tax for their children to finish the final three months. This system led to the creation of the Madison Public School System.

To learn more about the Rockingham County Public Library, please visit their website.

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.

To view more content from Rockingham County Public Library, please visit here.


Yearbooks From New Partner, P. S. Jones Alumni, Inc., Now Online

DigitalNC is happy to announce that 5 yearbooks from P.S. Jones High School have joined our digital yearbook collection courtesy of our new partners at P. S. Jones Alumni, Inc. These yearbooks span the years 1958 to 1968.

Located in Washington, NC, P.S. Jones High School was originally named Washington Colored Public School and was a Black public high school. The first iteration of Washington Colored Public School consisted of three detached structures that served primary, elementary, and high school students. Washington Colored Public School’s first class graduated in 1926. In 1950, Professor Professor Peter Simon Jones, a beloved teacher who taught at the school for 22 years, passed away. The community decided to rename the school P.S. Jones High School in his honor. The school disbanded in 1968 due to the integration of Washington City Schools (PS Jones High School Alumni). Today, P.S. Jones Middle School continues to carry the P.S. Jones name into the future. The yearbooks available on DigitalNC show the final decade of P.S. Jones High School, depicting the students, school clubs, sports teams, and more.

To view all five yearbooks, click here. To learn more about the history of P.S. Jones High School, please visit the P.S. Jones Alumni, Inc. website. Be sure to check out the virtual materials on the P. S. Jones African-American Education Museum as well!

References:

PS Jones High School Alumni. “Pave the Way” Buy a Brick. https://polarengraving.com/psjoneshighschoolalumni


Yearbooks from the North Carolina School for the Deaf Now Online

DigitalNC is happy to announce 35 yearbooks from our new partner, the North Carolina School for the Deaf. All of these yearbooks are from said school and cover years between 1915-1971.

The North Carolina School for the Deaf was founded in 1891 in Morganton, NC, located in the western part of the state. In a move to separate hearing impaired students from vision impaired students, whom all had a place under one school in Raleigh that went by the demeaning name of the North Carolina Institution for the Deaf and Dumb and the Blind, funds were established for the school at Morganton. The first brick laid for the school (with a name close to it’s sister school; the North Carolina School for the Deaf and Dumb) was by two future pupils, Maggie LeGrand and Robert C. Miller, on May 16, 1892. Doors were opened to 100 pupils on October 2, 1894. In 1907, the name officially changed to The North Carolina School for the Deaf (Class Book, images 17-18).

Funds from the state’s building program and a W.P.A. grant in the early 1940s allowed the school to construct cold storage, fencing, barns, a poultry house, playgrounds, an athletic field, as well as renovate school buildings to be properly fireproofed and ventilated (The Deaf Carolinian, image 22). Fast-forward to 1965, and the school has a large campus, with buildings both original and new.

To learn more about the history of the North Carolina School for the Deaf, please visit their website.  To view more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit the North Carolina Yearbooks page.

References:

North Carolina School for the Deaf. Class Book, Class of 1934 North Carolina School for the Deaf. https://lib.digitalnc.org/record/237179?ln=en#?c=0&m=0&s=0&cv=17&r=0&xywh=77%2C118%2C2410%2C1464

North Carolina School for the Deaf. The Deaf Carolinian. https://lib.digitalnc.org/record/237183#?c=0&m=0&s=0&cv=21&r=0&xywh=455%2C2058%2C2900%2C1762


Livingstone College and Boyden High School Yearbooks Now Available

Thanks to our partner, Rowan Public Library, Boyden High School and Livingstone College yearbooks are now available on our website. This batch includes yearbooks from 1941 for Boyden High School and 1930, 1946-1947 for Livingstone College.

Livingstone College is a historically Black college located in Salisbury, North Carolina. In 1879, the college was founded by the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Zion Church and was just a single building on 40 acres of land. In 1887,  the school was renamed from Zion Wesley College to Livingstone College in honor of David Livingstone—a philanthropist, explorer, and Christian missionary. Today, the college consists of more than 15 buildings on over 300 acres of land with over a thousand enrolled students. 

Pictures of students and the Livingstone College campus.Several pictures featuring various groupings of Livingstone College students.

In 1904, Salisbury High School was founded in to educate children of the area. Twenty-two years after its founding, in 1926, the school’s name changed to Boyden High School after a new school building was built. The school remained Boyden for almost 50 years until the name was reverted back to Salisbury High School in 1971. 
Page in the 1941 Salisbury High School yearbook detailing the various statistics of the class of 1941 including average height, eye color, etc.

To learn more about Rowan Public Library, please visit their website.

To view our North Carolina African American high school yearbooks, visit our African American high schools collection.

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.


Yearbooks and alumni materials from Clear Run High School on DigitalNC

3 yearbooks and materials from several alumni reunions, including the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the final graduating class in 2019, are now online from our partner Clear Run High School Alumni Association.  Clear Run High School served the Black community in Garland, North Carolina and the surrounding area in Sampson County until 1969, when it closed due to integration.  The alumni association remains quite active to this day, with annual reunions celebrating everyone who attended the school.  

Graduation portrait in black and white, with type of congratulations to the Class of 1969 celebrating their 50th anniversary

Page from the 1969 50th reunion program

Four students standing on stairs in business clothing

Class of 1969 senior class officers

To view more materials from Clear Run High School Association, visit their partner page.  To view more high school yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our North Carolina High School yearbooks collection.  


New Tyrrell and Columbia High School Materials Now Available

Thanks to our partner, Tyrrell County Public Library, two batches of materials from Tyrrell and Columbia High School are now available on our website. The first batch features Tyrrell High School’s 1961 yearbook as well as the 1977 edition of Columbia High School’s Swamproots. Filling in gaps from our website, five new Columbia High School yearbooks from the years 1959, 1960, 1965, 1968, and 1972 are included in the second batch.

Photographs of Tyrrell High School's music groups, the Melowtones and Elowettes. Included with the photos are the names of the group members.

The Melowtones and Elowettes

The athletics pages featuring two children playing football.

Homecoming queens Vicki Jones and Janet Walker standing next to each other with flowers in their arms.

Homecoming Queens Vicki Jones and Janet Walker

For more information about the Tyrrell County Pubic Library, please visit their website.

To view our North Carolina African American high school yearbooks, visit our African American high schools collection.

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.


Horton School and Jordan-Matthews yearbooks now online

Two yearbooks from Chatham County Historical Association are now online, the 1970 Creations yearbook from Horton Public School, the Pittsboro school for the Black community  and the 1963 Phantomaire, from Jordan-Matthews High School in Siler City. 

Page of a yearbook, featuring a picture of a hallway and a picture of students running

1970 was the last year that Horton High School graduated a class.  It became Horton Middle School the following year, in light of integration that was merging several white and Black student populations in Chatham County.  Horton is named for George Moses Horton, an enslaved man from Chapel Hill who taught himself to read and was the first Black man published in the south, with a book of poetry he composed. 

To view more materials from Chatham County Historical Association, visit their partner page.  To view more yearbooks, visit our North Carolina Yearbooks collection.


Freedman High School yearbooks now on DigitalNC

Thanks to our new partner, the Freedman Cultural Center of Caldwell County, 13 yearbooks from Freedman High School are now online. The yearbooks cover 1951-1965.  Freedman High School was located in Lenoir, NC and was an important center of the community. Freedman was a community of African Americans that was started just north of Lenoir in the late 1860s or early 1870s.  The school was started in 1932 and was the first high school for Black children in Caldwell County.  

Picture collage in the shape of 57

Collage from the 1957 yearbook

To learn more about the Freedman Cultural Center of Catawba County, visit their partner page.  To view more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit the North Carolina Yearbooks page.  


Clear Run High School Graduate Photographs Now Available

Thanks to our new partner, Clear Run High School Alumni Association, a batch containing class photographs of Clear Run High School’s 1959 to 1969 graduates are now available on our website. 

Prior to 1957,  Garland Colored and Bland High School served Sampson County’s southeastern Black population. The county’s Board of Education decided to consolidate the two smaller high schools, purchasing land for the new school in November of 1956. Eleven months later Clear Run High School opened its doors. The school’s first class included about 260 students and 11 staff members (including the principle) with enrollment increasing each year until the complete integration of North Carolina schools. 

As a result of the integration in 1969, Clear Run High School students were moved to Union High School while the Clear Run building was converted to a middle school. The building operated as Clear Run Middle School until it was permanently closed in the 1980s.

Clear Run High School. Garland, NC. Class of 1965. Photos of students in their graduation caps and gowns. Included also are the pictures of two advisors and the principle.

To learn more about the Clear Run High School Alumni Association, please visit their website

To view more photographs of places and people in North Carolina, visit our Images of North Carolina Collection.

To view our North Carolina African American high school yearbooks, visit our African American high schools collection.


Fill-In Batch of The Carolina Indian Voice Now Online

DigitalNC is happy to announce a new batch of digitized newspaper issues from The Carolina Indian Voice. This round of issues includes most of 1976, all of 1977, and fill-ins for the years 1979-1996. These additions have brought us that much closer to a complete online collection of The Voice. We would like to thank our partners at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for providing the physical issues that made this possible.

Established in 1973 and running until 2005, The Carolina Indian Voice published weekly on Thursdays. The Voice was based out of Pembroke, North Carolina, seat of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina. As the majority of Pembroke and Robeson County residents are of Lumbee ancestry, The Voice focused on local issues and events that spoke to the interests of the Indigenous community. With taglines such as “Dedicated to the Best in All of Us” and “Building Communicative Bridges in a Tri-Racial Setting”, many articles from ’76 and ’77 focus on advocacy and race. Headlines include local election coverage and racially conscious endorsements for representatives as well as pointed opinion pieces from founder and editor Bruce Barton on topics such as racial injustice.

A clipping of an advertisement titled "Don't Waste Your Vote-Power: Vote For Nine" in The Carolina Indian Voice, August 12, 1976. It implores citizens to vote for representatives according to the population's demographics for the Robeson County School District Board of Education election to correct long time racial injustices; "six (6) Indians, two (2) Blacks, and one (1) White". It was paid for by the Ad Hoc Committee to Break Double Voting.

The Carolina Indian Voice, August 12, 1976. This advertisement implores citizens to vote for representatives according to the population’s demographics for the Robeson County School District Board of Education election to correct long standing racial injustices; “six (6) Indians, two (2) Blacks, and one (1) White”.

The Carolina Indian Voice provides a necessary Indigenous perspective to life in North Carolina. To browse through all currently digitized issues of The Voice, click here. And to see more materials from our partner the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, visit their partner page here.