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Additional Items from Granville County Public Library now Online

Yearbook photo 1956 Pep PacGranville County Public Library has contributed yearbooks and some manuscript volumes to DigitalNC, including the first yearbook on the site from Warren county.

Yearbooks

  • The Warrentonian [1949] John Graham High School, Warrenton, N.C.
  • Pep-Pac [1948] [1956] Henderson High School, Henderson, N.C.
  • Nahiscoan [1954] Nashville High School, Nashville, N.C.

Other Items

You can view all of Granville County Public Library’s content on DigitalNC.


Granville County Scrapbooks and Genealogies Now Available

Granville County Scrapbooks

Granville County Scrapbooks

Several scrapbooks from Granville County Public Library are now available on digitalnc.org. They are divided into three sets, all indexed by last name and organized by date:

  • Families of Granville County – includes newspaper clippings featuring family members, event announcements, wedding and birth announcements, family histories, family trees, and miscellaneous items (such as postcards or Christmas cards)
Families of Granville County - Hobgood & Horner

Families of Granville County – Hobgood & Horner from the F-H Volume

Granville Marriages, v. II, Knopf & Clifton

Granville Marriages II, Gertrude Knopf to Clifton Bradford

These scrapbooks belong to the larger Hays Collection, a many volume collection of Oxford and Granville County histories created by Francis B. Hays over the course of more than 75 years.

Article about Mr. Francis B. Hays in Oxford and Granville Men & Women, vol. 7

Article about Mr. Francis B. Hays in Oxford and Granville Men & Women, vol. 7

The last several pages of Oxford and Granville Men and Women, vol. 7 feature articles about Mr. Hays. Written in 1958, when Mr. Hays was 91 years old, these articles explain his process and philosophy behind gathering all of this information and organizing it into these volumes, and discuss — among other things — Mr. Hays’ love for chess, his past as an editor and druggist, and his history of helping school children and “Granville’s migrants” in history projects and genealogical inquiries.  In addition to these articles is an article by Mr. Hays called “It was News in 1911.”

These materials are part of an ongoing digitization project. More volumes to come!


High School Yearbooks from Oxford and Other Granville County Towns Now Available Online

Yearbooks from several high schools in Granville County are now available online in the North Carolina High School Yearbooks digital collection. There are 54 volumes online, ranging in date from 1899 to 1962. The yearbooks are from the collections of the Granville County Public Library in Oxford. The following schools are included:


60 Newspaper Titles on DigitalNC!

Headmast for the January 30, 1836 issue of Salem, N.C.'s Farmers' Reporter

This week we have another 60 titles up on DigitalNC! While these papers cover all of North Carolina, almost one third are from Statesville alone!

In the October 3rd, 1902 issue of Elizabeth City’s Tar Heel, there is an interview with Reginald Aubrey Fessenden’s assistant, Professor Saint Marie. Fessenden was a pioneer in early radio, or “wireless telegraphy,” and was conducting experiments at Manteo on Roanoke Island. In the interview, Prof. Saint Marie seems somewhat pessimistic about the process and its possibilities, which might be due to Fessenden abruptly ending their contract with the Weather Bureau the previous month after conflict arose over ownership of the patent.

October 3, 1902 interview with Reginald Fessenden's assistant, Professor Saint Marie

Tar Heel, October 3, 1902

However, less than two months later The News and Observer reported that Fessenden’s invention had greatly improved and could now send transmissions to Washington, D.C. On Christmas Eve, 1906, he conducted the first radio broadcast by reading a bible verse and then playing ‘O Holy Night’ on his violin for the ships off the coast of Massachusetts. By 1909, according the the Charlotte Evening Observer, he had perfected the process for which he laid the foundation on the Carolina coast.

Article from The News and Observer describing Fessenden's success with radio experiments

News and Observer, November 23, 1902

Article from Charlotte Evening Chronicle stating that Fessenden had perfected his radio process

Evening Chronicle, April 14, 1909

Over the next year, we’ll be adding millions of newspaper images to DigitalNC. These images were originally digitized a number of years ago in a partnership with Newspapers.com. That project focused on scanning microfilmed papers published before 1923 held by the North Carolina Collection in Wilson Special Collections Library. While you can currently search all of those pre-1923 issues on Newspapers.com, over the next year we will also make them available in our newspaper database as well. This will allow you to search that content alongside the 2 million pages already on our site – all completely open access and free to use.

This week’s additions include:

Elizabeth City

Moravian Falls

North Wilkesboro

Oxford

Pittsboro

Rutherfordton

Salem

Salisbury

Selma

Shelby

Siler City

Smithfield

Statesville

Stonewall

Tarboro

Taylorsville

Wadesboro

Warrenton

Washington

Wilson

Windsor

If you want to see all of the newspapers we have available on DigitalNC, you can find them here. Thanks to UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries for permission to and support for adding all of this content as well as the content to come. We also thank the North Caroliniana Society for providing funding to support staff working on this project.


Almost 40 Newspaper Titles on DigitalNC this week!

Headmast for Snow Hill, N.C. paper The Great Sunny South

This week we have another 38 newspaper titles up on DigitalNC! In this batch, we have issues spanning 33 years from Oxford, N.C. paper Oxford Public Ledger. In addition to being the county seat for Granville County, Oxford is also home to the first female parachutist and inventor of the ripcord: Georgia “Tiny” Broadwick.

Georgia was born April 8, 1893 and weighed only three pounds at birth, earning her the nickname “Tiny.” She was married at age 12, had a child at 13, and was widowed before she was 15. In 1907, her life changed forever when she saw The Broadwicks and their Famous French Aeronauts perform aerial stunts at the North Carolina State Fair. She left home, joined the Broadwicks travelling show, and was legally adopted by the show owner, Charles Broadwick, making her “Tiny” Broadwick.

Posed photo of Georgia 'Tiny' Broadwick, 1911. "Youngest Girl Aeronaut"

Georgia ‘Tiny’ Broadwick, 1911. Via Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.

In an exhibition in Chicago the week of September 16, 1912, Broadwick became the first woman to parachute from a plane. In 1914, jumped into Lake Michigan, making her the first woman to parachute into a body of water. Also in 1914, she debuted the ripcord in a parachuting demonstration for the U.S. Army, performing the first planned free-fall jump from an airplane. By the end of her career she is said to have performed over 1,100 jumps.

Clipping detailing Georgia 'Tiny' Broadwick's 1914 Los Angeles jump

Wilmington Star, January 10, 1914

Over the next year, we’ll be adding millions of newspaper images to DigitalNC. These images were originally digitized a number of years ago in a partnership with Newspapers.com. That project focused on scanning microfilmed papers published before 1923 held by the North Carolina Collection in Wilson Special Collections Library. While you can currently search all of those pre-1923 issues on Newspapers.com, over the next year we will also make them available in our newspaper database as well. This will allow you to search that content alongside the 2 million pages already on our site – all completely open access and free to use.

This week’s additions include:

If you want to see all of the newspapers we have available on DigitalNC, you can find them here. Thanks to UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries for permission to and support for adding all of this content as well as the content to come. We also thank the North Caroliniana Society for providing funding to support staff working on this project.


Granville Newspapers Provide Samples of A+ Student Comedy

A cartoon of two students talking

A cartoon from the March 13, 1941 The Owl

Some say that high school student humor is a bit sophomoric; as evidence to the contrary, we’ve uploaded several student newspapers (thanks to our partner, the Granville County Public Library) that will at least make you smile.

First up are a couple of jokes from the Oxford High School Student PaperThe Owl. These jokes are from their “This n’ That” section of the March 13, 1941 issue.

A joke from the student newspaper       A joke from the student newspaper

 

This section also includes some stellar student profiles. One “Sophisticated Senior” lists her favorite pastime as “flirting” and her hobby as “catching beau.” A “Silly Sophomore” prefers to spend her time “eating” and aspires to be a “Bulls’ Eye Egg thrower.”

Excerpt from a newspaper articleFor a bit of darker humor, the 1967 senior class of J. F. Webb High School ran an extended graduation joke in the form of a “Last Will and Testament,” describing what each person left behind to an underclassman. 

Items I and II leave “appreciation,” “respect,” and “esteem” to the principal and teachers. Item III leaves “old books,” “battered lockers,” and some hangout spot called “The Cave” to the student body in general. Item IV is where things start to get personal.

 

Many students opted for the “I leave my book, ‘How to Get Girls to Like You,’ to my friend Tommy” joke. A few, like Ellen Franklin and Wayne White, left treasured spots. Ronnie Daniel seems to be the only one who bequeathed a “kiss, bear hug, and a love lick on the top of his head.”A letter published in the Stovall High School student newspaper

In Stovall High School’s paper, The Breeze, the back page is covered in  miscellany briefs, including “A Second Grade Letter” by Margaret Gill. Even though Margaret didn’t seem to find it funny that her ducks drink so much water, it’s certainly entertaining to read.

An excerpt from a 1958 Proconian

This 1958 issue of Chapel Hill High School’s Proconian didn’t have the established humor section of some previous issues, though it did have a sassy note commenting on current affairs.

 

The full list of added newspapers (some by students and some for the community) includes:

  • The Owl (Oxford, N.C.) – 1941-1959
  • The Spectator (Oxford, N.C.) – 1967-1971
  • Berea Gazette (Berea, N.C.) – 1923
  • The Breeze (Stovall, N.C.) – 1923
  • Proconian (Chapel Hill, N.C.) – 1958
  • The Granville Enterprise (Oxford, N.C.) – 1914
  • Granville County News (Oxford, N.C.) – 1929
  • Oxford Mercury (Oxford, N.C.) – 1842

To see more materials from the Granville County Public Library, visit their partner page or their website. You can browse all newspapers in our North Carolina Newspapers collection.


Middleburg, Polkton, and Jefferson High School Yearbooks Now Available on DigitalNC

Thanks to our partner, Granville County Public Library, five yearbook issues from 1957 to 1962 are now available on our website. This batch adds Polkton High School to our list of schools with available yearbooks and expands on our holdings of Middleburg and Jefferson High School. Featured in the yearbooks is a look into education in the northern part of the state including the various clubs and sports offered at each school and photographs of fun school events.

Bus drivers for Middleburg High School sitting on a bus. One person is in the driver's seat while the rest are in the bench seats, all smiling at the camera from the window. Included are the bus driver's names: Hunter Reavis, Tommy Hendricks, Johnny Watkins, Jimmy Holloway, and Eddie Royster.

1961 Middleburg High School Bus Drivers

To learn more about Granville County Public Library, please visit their website.

For more yearbooks from across North Carolina, visit our yearbook collection.


Contributions of Vance County People of Color now available on DigitalNC

The book Contributions of Vance County People of Color by Ruth Anita Hawkins Hughes is now available on DigitalNC.  Thanks to a request from a community member, the folks at Granville County Public Library, and UNC Libraries, we were able to digitize this book.  

Four black and white photographs, top left is a woman in a large white dress who is sitting posed, top right is a child in a white dress standing posed, bottom left is a woman on the phone and the bottom right is a woman in a white nursing outfit holding a dog

Photographs of people discussed in the book are included

Written in 1988, the book contains vignettes about many Black residents of Vance County during the 20th century.  The book is broken up into chapters about farm families, and town families, and then by different occupations in the county.  An amazing resource particularly for genealogists, Contributions… is full text searchable, making it easy to search names quickly!  

To view more materials about the Black community in North Carolina, visit our African American newspapers collection and our general collection here.


1950s Creedmoor High School Yearbooks are available now!

 
Creedmoor High School yearbook, 1952

Creedmoor High School yearbook, 1952

Four Creedmoor High School yearbooks, from 1952 to 1955, are now digitized and available on DigitalNC thanks to our partners at Granville County Public Library. DigitalNC had previously only hosted the 1951 annual. Creedmoor High School was the local school until 1962, when the consolidated South Granville High School opened. Click here to browse all Granville County yearbooks on DigitalNC, from 1912 to  1968, including the only other yearbook from Creedmoor, the G. C. Hawley High School Hornet from 1967 and 1968.

To learn more about our partner the Granville County Public Library, visit their partner page here or their website here. To browse yearbooks from across North Carolina, click here.

 


Even More Scrapbooks from the Francis B. Hays Collection Now Online

Photos of different buildings by Mrs. Addie Wood. The church (top right) was built in 1754.

Volumes 135 through 140 of the Francis B. Hays Collection of scrapbooks from Granville County Public Library are now up on DigitalNC. These scrapbooks add to the extensive collection of volumes compiled by Mr. Hays, an avid local historian from the Granville area. Each scrapbook contains a wealth of information relating to a specific subject, and many contain notes and letters written by Mr. Hays himself. This batch of scrapbooks focuses mainly on family genealogies.

1957 letter addressed to Francis B. Hays.

Letter to Mr. Hays about ancestral information on the Duty family.

Volume 135 is the church book for Granville Circuit, including rolls of congregants dating back to 1836. Also included are the church programs for Oxford Methodist Church in Oxford, NC from September 1941 to June 1942. Volumes 136 through 140 are various genealogies for local families, including information on family records, marriages, newspaper clippings, and photographs dating back to the 17th century. Also included are various personal letters to Mr. Hays.

For more scrapbooks compiled by Francis B. Hays, you can visit the DigitalNC page for the Francis B. Hays Collection or view our previous blog posts on the collection. You can also see more materials from the Granville County Public Library partner page.


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