Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Materials dating back to 1876 now online from Union County Public Library

In a new batch of items from partner Union County Public Library, which they digitized themselves, there are materials that date all the way back to 1876.  A catalog for Monroe High School from 1876 details all the classes one could take at the school, which was a white, private, co-educational school that advertised not only to those who lived in Monroe, but in the surrounding area, including South Carolina.  In the first section of the book it lists the enrollment at the school and hometowns of each student.  The cost for 20 weeks at the school was $10-$16 tuition plus $50 for room and board.  page listing the students enrolled at Monroe High School

Other materials from this batch include several Chamber of Commerce publications promoting Monroe, NC, a feature on the new library in Monroe, and the minutes of the Union County Medical Association from 1902 to 1922.  The Medical Association minutes are particularly interesting in mentioning about a black doctor, Dr. J.S. Massey, being a member in 1903 in what was otherwise an all white organization.  This would have been during a time of increasing segregation and aggression by whites against black in North Carolina following the Plessy vs. Ferguson decision and the 1898 race riots in Wilmington and the shift in the government in 1900 to a white supremacist Democratic leadership. 

There is also a yearbook from 1954 from Union High School that was located in Lanes Creek Township.  

To view more materials from Union County Public Library, visit their partner page.  


Editions of the Meredith College Herald and Oak Leaves Now Available!

Thanks to our partner, Meredith College, we now have more editions of the Meredith College student newspapers the Meredith Herald and the Twig, and the yearbook, Oak Leaves.

Front page of the September 12, 2018 issue of the Meredith Herald.

This batch includes issues of the Twig from April 10, 1965-May 25, 1966 and issues of the Meredith Herald from March 4, 2015-April 10, 2019. Both newspapers report on events both at the college and in the surrounding area. The issues of the Twig include topics such as drinking legislation updates and graduation schedule announcements. Issues of the Herald include topics such as the Silent Sam controversy at UNC-Chapel Hill and the name change for the Meredith College newspaper from the Twig to the Meredith Herald. Also recently uploaded are editions of Oak Leaves, the yearbook of Meredith College, from 2010-2018.

The cover of the 2015 edition of Oak Leaves, the yearbook of Meredith College.

To view all of the items we’ve scanned for Meredith take a look at their contributor page. For more information about this partner, visit their website.


Additional Photographs Showcasing Edgecombe County’s Historic Architecture Online Now

A newly digitized batch of photographs of historic homes and structures in Edgecombe County has been added to our website, courtesy of our partner, the Edgecombe County Memorial Library. Follow this link see the previously published batch of photos and this link to see the blog post about the previous batch of photographs.

One of the houses exhibited in these photographs is the Hart House, built by William A. Hart, a well-known Edgecombe County businessman and farmer, in 1909. This home is a rare example of a columned house in the Neo-Classical style in Tarboro.

The M. A. Hart House, located at 1109 Main St. in Tarboro, N.C.

Another house that can be seen in the batch of photographs is the J. J. Green House. This two-story home with its blend of Queen Anne and Neo-Classical architectural themes was built around 1900 by Rocky Mount architect John C. Stout, the cashier of the Bank of Tarboro.

A photograph of the J. J. Green House, located at 800 Main St. in Tarboro, N.C.

For more about the Edgecombe County Memorial Library, visit their partner page or check out their website.


Several Wayne County Boy’s Club Scrapbooks are now live!

Several scrapbooks from the Wayne County Boy’s Club have been added to our website, courtesy of our partner the Wayne County Public Library. These scrapbooks include histories of the club, photos, newspaper clippings, and other memorabilia from or related to the Wayne County Boy’s Club. They roughly span the years of 1946-1980.  The scrapbook from 1974-1975 focuses on the integration of the Boys Club in Goldsboro, when the EA House and Paley units of the club combined.  

The cover of the Boy’s Club Scrapbook containing materials from the period between 1946-1959.

In addition to these scrapbooks, this batch also includes the program from the Eastern North Carolina Drama Festival, which was held at Goldsboro High School on March 27-29, 1947.

For more information on the Wayne County Public Library, please visit their website.


Sixteen yearbooks from Surry County are now available on DigitalNC

Thanks to our partners at Surry Community College, DigitalNC is proud to host sixteen new yearbooks from Surry County. The batch consists of 8 yearbooks from Pilot Mountain High School (1947-1961) in Pilot Mountain, 4 yearbooks from Beulah High School (1956-1959) in Dobson, and 4 yearbooks from Surry Central High School in Dobson (1965-1968).

The Eaglet of Beulah High School, 1956

The Eaglet of Beulah High School, 1956

The yearbooks provide insight into the lives of students at the three schools in the mid-twentieth century, sharing memories of academic and extracurricular activities.

The Aquila, 1966

The Aquila of Surry Central High School, 1966

We are thankful to Surry Community College for helping us make these yearbooks accessible online. To view all 16 yearbooks in this batch, click here. To see all digitized materials from Surry Community College, click here. To learn more about the college, visit their partner page here or their website here.


Publications from the Penland School of Craft now available!

Thanks to our new partner, the Penland School of Craft, we now have course catalogs covering the years 1939-1962, nine issues of the Grapevine campus newsletter, several issues of the Mountain Milestones pamphlets from 1932-1962, Annual Reports from 1998-2015, and the student publications The Story of the Penland Weavers and the Weaver’s Hornbook: Tale of What Is Weaving WhereThe Penland Line, a newspaper published by the staff of Penland for the Penland and wider craft community, is also now on DigitalNC.  

Penland School of Craft is an educational institution in Penland, NC. It was founded by Lucy Morgan in 1929 and it functions to this day as an educational community for craft artists, offering courses in mediums such as book arts and textiles. Students live on-campus throughout the duration of their workshops, and they only take one workshop at a time to ensure total immersion in their chosen craft. The school also offer a number of residencies and fellowships throughout the year.

The cover of the course catalog for the tenth session of the Penland School, which spanned the time period of June 26th to August 26th, 1939.

For more information about the Penland School of Craft, visit their institutional website.


The Concord Times is now available on DigitalNC!

The Concord Times, February 19, 1923

The Concord Times, February 19, 1923

520 issues of The Concord Times from 1923 to 1927 have recently been digitized and added to DigitalNC thanks to a nomination from our partner Cabarrus County Public Library! The paper from Concord, North Carolina, documents 1920s happenings around the town, the state, and beyond. Published every Tuesday and Thursday, the paper frequently delivered news to its readers. A sampling of clippings  are shared below:

The Concord Times, October 11, 1923

The Concord Times, October 11, 1923

The Concord Times, July 1, 1926

The Concord Times, July 1, 1926

To learn more about The Concord Times and see all 500+ issues, click here. For other digitized newspapers from Concord, North Carolina, visit this page.


Yearbooks from the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library Now Available!

Thanks to our partner Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, we now have new editions of yearbooks from Mecklenburg County Schools up on our website. We have the 1968 editions of East Wind, the East Mecklenburg High School yearbook; Somecka, the South Mecklenburg High School Yearbook; Ships & Cuts from Garinger High School; The Torch from Olympic High School, The Acorn from Harding University High School; Lion from West Charlotte High School; Post Script from Charlotte Country Day School; Mustang from Myers Park High School; Tomahawk from West Mecklenburg High School; and Spirit of ’68 from Independence Senior High School.

Front cover of the 1968 edition of Somecka, the yearbook for South Mecklenburg High School in Pineville, North Carolina.

You can see yearbooks and a number of other items we’ve scanned for Charlotte Mecklenburg Library on their contributor page. For more information about this partner, visit their website.


New Paper, The Free Will Baptist, Available at DigitalNC

Thanks to our partner, University of Mount Olive, DigitalNC welcomes 61 issues of a new church newspaper called The Free Will Baptist, which span the years 1874 – 1913.

Front page of The Free Will Baptist Newspaper; Vol 5, Issue 35

In 1873 the General Conference of the North Carolina Free Will Baptists authorized editor and proprietor E. Robert Ellis to print this weekly newspaper in Fremont, N.C. for the benefit of the denomination, although it was originally called The Free Will Baptist Advocate. Over the course of its publication history, the paper’s location was moved to at least four other North Carolina cities — including Toisnot (now known as Elm City, not included in this batch), New Bern, Ormondsville, and Ayden. After 1880 when the paper was again publishing in Fremont, N.C., the word “advocate” was dropped from its name. This would be the community paper’s second and final name change.

The publications regularly feature poetry, sermons, editorial pieces…

"A Short Sermon" article clipping from The Free Will Baptist newspaper

…and of course, advertisements:

Ads from The Free Will Baptist Newspaper

The ‘Locals’ section offers a fascinating look into the comings and goings of the community this newspaper served.

Clipping from 'Locals' section of The Free Will Baptist

Clipping from ‘Locals’ section of The Free Will Baptist, Vol 19, Iss. 11

View the entire collection of the Free Will Baptist at DigitalNC!

 

 


More issues of the Charlotte Post are available online now!

The Charlotte Post, June 18, 1998

The Charlotte Post, June 18, 1998

Nearly sixty additional issues of The Charlotte Post have been added to DigitalNC. These new issues, from 1998 to 2006, were added to existing issues from 1930 to 1934 and 1971 to 1997. In total, DigitalNC is proud to host nearly 1000 issues of The Charlotte Post, showcasing Charlotte’s strong legacy of journalism in its African American communities. We are thankful to Johnson C. Smith University for their partnership in providing these papers.

This latest batch includes more of the same great content from The Charlotte Post, documenting Charlotte’s communities as well as issues from across the state, country, and world.

Some digital “clippings” are shared below:

CIAA Special Edition, February 23, 2006

CIAA Special Edition, February 23, 2006

"World War wasn't only battle women fought," May 25, 2000

“World War wasn’t only battle women fought,” May 25, 2000

"Nouveau soul food," January 8, 2004

“Nouveau soul food,” January 8, 2004

DigitalNC is thankful to our partner Johnson C. Smith University for  working with us to provide digital access to The Charlotte Post. To view all digitized issues of this paper, click here. For more information about Johnson C. Smith University, visit their partner page here or their website here.