DigitalNC: North Carolina's Digital Heritage

Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Additional Yearbook added from C.M. Eppes High School Alumni Heritage Society, Inc.

Eppesonian [1958], page 49

Eppesonian [1958], page 49

The 1958 edition of the Eppesonian is now available on DigitalNC!

Thanks to the C.M. Eppes High School Alumni Heritage Society, Inc., this yearbook adds to the run of yearbooks that are already available online. They document nearly 15 years of student life at the high school, located in Greenville, NC. You view all of the digitized editions at the following link. Eppes High School was a segregated high school until 1970, at which time it merged with Junius H. Rose High School.

To learn more about C.M. Eppes High School and the Alumni Heritage Society visit the contributor page. To view more yearbooks that document the lives of African American high school students in North Carolina, browse the African American High School Yearbooks Collection.

Eppesonian [1958], page 58

Eppesonian [1958], page 58


Valentine’s Day with Rex Hospital

rex1990003-1In honor of Valentine’s Day, an article in Volume 2, Issue 6 of Nursing Perspectives, published in 1990 by Rex Hospital in Raleigh, discusses the origin of Valentine’s Day, and casts it as an important day to honor those in the field of healthcare. According the the article, like St. Valentine, who died helping others, healthcare professionals consistently “care for the victims of poverty, hunger, and carry the spirit of brotherly love throughout the year.”

Click here to take a look at this issue and read more about this interesting perspective on Valentine’s Day, and here to see other materials provided by Rex Healthcare Library. rex1990003


New Exhibit Shares Largest Collection of Digitized NC African American Newspapers

The only issue we have (so far) of a Carver High School newspaper. Mount Olive, NC, May 1950.

From our estimation, DigitalNC shares more digitized historical North Carolina African American newspapers than any other source. Contributors range from our state’s HBCUs to local libraries and museums. To help pull these titles together, we created an exhibit page through which you can search and browse eleven community papers and nine student papers. There are also links to more available on other sites.

Below we’ve re-posted the essay from the exhibit, giving you a brief history of these papers. We hope that we’ll hear from others who may be interested in sharing more of these rare resources online.

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Since the publication of Freedom’s Journal in 1827 in New York City, African American newspapers have had a long and impactful history in the United States. Begun as a platform to decry the treatment of slaves, the earliest African American newspapers appealed to whites, who were politically enfranchised. After the Civil War, as newly freed African Americans claimed the right to literacy, the number of African American newspapers around the country grew exponentially and the editors began addressing blacks instead of whites. Papers turned their focus from slavery to a variety of subjects: religion, politics, art, literature, and news as viewed through the eyes of African American reporters and readers. Communication about black political and social struggles through Reconstruction and, later, the Civil Rights movement, cemented newspapers as integral to African American life. 

In North Carolina, the first African American papers were religious publications. The North Carolina Christian Advocate, which appears to be the earliest, was published from 1855-1861 by the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, followed by the Episcopal Methodist, a shorter-lived publication produced during the Civil War by the same organization. After the Civil War, the number of African American newspapers continued to grow in North Carolina, reaching a peak during the 1880s and 1890s with more than 30 known titles beginning during that time.

The longest running African American paper established in North Carolina is the Star of Zion, originating in Charlotte in 1876 and still being produced today. Other long-running papers in the state include the Charlotte Post (begun 1890), The Carolina Times (Durham, begun 1919), the Carolinian (Raleigh, begun 1940), Carolina Peacemaker (Greensboro, begun 1967), and the Winston-Salem Chronicle (begun 1974). Many of these long running papers powerfully documented black culture and opinion in North Carolina during the 1960s-1970s, with numerous editorials and original reporting of local and national civil rights news.

Occasionally overlooked sources for African American newspapers are North Carolina’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) and, before integration, African American high schools. You’ll find links on DigitalNC to newspapers from eight of North Carolina’s twelve current and historical HBCUs as well as two African American high schools.

While many African American newspapers have found their way into archives and libraries, it’s common to see broken runs and missing issues. You can find a great inventory of known papers from the UNC Libraries. If you work for a library, archive, or museum in North Carolina holding additional issues and would like to inquire about digitizing them and making them available online, please let us know.


Pine Knoll Shores newspaper issues through 2016 now online

pinewoodssnake

A pine woods snake hatching and adult shown in the December 2016 issue of The Shoreline

Issues of the Pine Knoll Shores Newspaper, The Shoreline, from 2015 through 2016, are now online courtesy of the History Committee of the Town of Pine Knoll Shores. These issues join 4 decades of The Shoreline that were added to DigitalNC a year ago.

The Shoreline is a monthly publication that covers various aspects of life in Pine Knoll Shores, and includes articles on community events and clubs, stories about local businesses, notes from the mayor, book reviews, and more. As Pine Knoll Shores is a beach town located along Bogue Banks, there is an emphasis on the great outdoors, including  news stories and event coverage pertaining to fishing, hunting, hiking, and beach-going.

A recent article in the December 2016 issue of The Shoreline tells the story of the 1871 discovery of a new species of snake, the pine wood snake, by botanist Dr. H.C. Yarrow, in present day Pine Knoll Shores. Pine wood snakes are common throughout the southeastern coastal plain, and are completely harmless to humans and pets. They are considered in the article to be “a living piece of Bogue Banks history.”

Click here to view over 40 years of The Shoreline. To learn more about the History Committee of the Town of Pine Knoll Shores, take a look at their partner page, or website.


Announcing a 6-Month In-Depth Digitization Effort at NCDHC: Underrepresented Communities

The Wilson Tau Gamma Delta Sorority, Date Unknown

Here at the Digital Heritage Center we’ve been talking about what we can do to increase representation of underrepresented communities on DigitalNC.org. Serving these communities in ways that respect their priorities and beliefs has become a focus for many libraries, archives, and museums, and we hear partners and other DigitalNC fans asking us about this as well.  We have a few ideas in the works that we’ll be talking about over the next year.

I’m writing today about one of those ideas. We’d like to try a 6-month in-depth digitization effort during which we focus on working with you to share items in your collections representing traditionally underrepresented communities. This may be groups including but not limited to African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos/as, American Indians, LGBTQ. If you feel sharing those items online would be useful to your users, we’d like to make that happen.

Our goals with this idea are to (1) bring partners together in a shared initiative (2) discover new collections and (3) better represent the diversity of North Carolina on DigitalNC.org.

If you are eligible to work with the Digital Heritage Center, have something that fits with this effort, and would like to collaborate, contact us.

Have other digitization priorities? No problem! This won’t preclude other projects you had intended to plan with the Center. 

Thanks for considering participating in this effort, and please share this post broadly.


High Point Scrapbooks now up on DigitalNC

centennial_celebration

From the title page of the High Point Centennial Festival Celebration program

Five scrapbooks provided by the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library are now up on DigitalNC. These scrapbooks collect newspaper clippings that focus on municipal issues in and around High Point, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Each scrapbook covers topics in chronological order, with the first volume starting with articles from early 1951, and the last volume ending with articles from 1954. Many newspapers are represented in these scrapbooks including The High Point Enterprise, Greensboro Daily News, and The Beacon.

centennial_celebration2

From the cover of the High Point Centennial Festival Celebration program

Also collected in volume 29, is a program from High Point’s 1951 centennial celebration, which focused on a “Dramatic Historical Spectacle” called “Then & Now” that told the history of High Point. The program also contains many advertisements for High Point businesses, including many furniture companies for which High Point continues to be known today.

Click here to take a look at these 5 scrapbooks, and learn more about the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library by visiting their partner page and website.


Recent issues of The Charlotte Jewish News are now online

image_601x817_from_6967_to_33824566

A stained glass window by artist Alan Schaefer, as shown in the June 2015 issue of The Charlotte Jewish News.

New issues of The Charlotte Jewish News from 2013 through early 2016 are now online courtesy of The Jewish Historical Society of Greater Charlotte, located at the Levine-Sklut Judaic Library and Resource Center. The new issues join previously digitized issues that go back as far as 1979.

These newsletters were published on a monthly basis, and contain news stories relating to the Jewish community in and around Charlotte, North Carolina. Included are stories covering local holiday celebrations, speakers, and workshops, as well as essays and editorials. As time has gone on, the newsletter has become more and more expansive, with the first newsletters in 1979 being only a few pages long, and more recent issues often topping 40 pages. from the start, the newsletter focused on community building with each issues containing listings of upcoming activities and events. News about different Synagogues and community facilities is also covered in the newsletter. The above photo shows a series of stained glass panels dedicated at Temple Kol Tikvah in 2015 that include twelve Jewish symbols illustrating the Hebrew concept of Kavod, which the artist Alan Schaefer describes as meaning “tribute, honor, and homage.”

Click here to see all the digitized issues of The Charlotte Jewish News. To learn more about the Jewish Historical Society of Greater Charlotte, visit their contributor page, or the website for the Levine-Sklut Judaic Library and Resource Center.


“I Said ‘NO’ in the Best Way That I Was Able”: Images of Student Protests over Time in North Carolina Student Publications

The quote in this post’s title comes from a student who participated in a 1989 protest at UNC-Chapel Hill, pictured below.

One of the most historic student protests in the United States happened on this day in 1960 right here in North Carolina. NC A&T students protested segregation by sitting down at a segregated Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro. The first images in this post were taken at that event and come from the 1960 Ayantee yearbook. Other images come from schools in all parts of the state, and date from 1960 through 2012. 

North Carolina college students have passionately protested a variety of issues and events over the years. Looking back through yearbooks and student newspapers, you’ll find editorials with strong opinions and photographs of students standing up and speaking out in this most public of ways. Today we’re sharing the tradition of protest by students over the years, as reported in their own media. 

 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College, 1960, Segregation (Woolworth’s Lunch Counter, Greensboro)

North Carolina Central University, 1960, Segregation (Woolworth’s Lunch Counter, Durham)

Livingstone College, 1961-1962, Segregation (Capitol Theater, Salisbury)

Wake Forest University, 1969, Assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Saint Augustine’s, 1970, Vietnam War

UNC-Chapel Hill, 1977, B-1 Bomber and Nuclear Armament

UNC-Chapel Hill, 1989, Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

Mitchell Community College, 1990-1991, Hazardous Waste and Environmental Pollution

UNC-Chapel Hill, 1993, Racism

UNC-Asheville, 2012, Hate Crimes


Sampson Community College yearbooks

Day's Eye [1971], page 64-65

Day’s Eye [1971], page 64-65

Day's Eye [1970], page 44

Day’s Eye [1970], page 44

Yearbooks are some of the most popular materials on DigitalNC and Sampson Community College has provided eleven more!

Sampson Community College, located in Clinton N.C., has a vibrant campus community with students and instructors of all ages. These yearbooks document the academic programs at the college, such as nursing, drafting, and office management. In addition, they also contain many images of campus events, traditions, and fashions. Yearbooks like these and the many others in the North Carolina Yearbooks Collection could be useful for those interested in genealogy or those hoping to just browse through the images of people and activities at colleges and high schools throughout North Carolina.

 

 

Day's Eye [1970], page 25

Day’s Eye [1970], page 25

Yearbooks in this batch include:

 

To learn more about Sampson Community College, visit their contributor page on DigitalNC or follow the link to their website.


World War I Records Now Available from Wilson County Public Library

The United Daughters of the Confederacy World War Records of Lineal Descendants of Confederate Veterans, Record 1

The United Daughters of the Confederacy World War Records of Lineal Descendants of Confederate Veterans, Record 1

Thanks to the Wilson County Public Library, nearly 70 World War I lineage records are now online.

Compiled by the United Daughters of the Confederacy’s North Carolina Chapter, these war records document information about men from Wilson County who served during the first World War. The records include the name, rank, and address of the soldier, as well as when and where they enlisted, the camps where they were trained, and when the soldier was discharged. In addition, it also includes the father’s name and address, mother’s maiden name, and the names and ranks of Confederate ancestors. Although most of the items are hand written, the names, camps, and dates have been included in the metadata and are searchable.

All of the records are in great condition and the handwriting is legible. These documents could be extremely helpful for genealogists and researchers interested in both World War I and Civil War information.

To learn more about the Wilson County Public Library, please visit the contributor page or the website. You can access more war records from Wilson County within the exhibit Wilson County’s Greatest Generation: The Memories of the World War II Veterans of Wilson County, N.C.