Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries by Julia Gootzeit


New Materials from Rockingham County Public Library Include News Clippings, Booklets, and More

cover of an economic packet for encouraging economic investment in Madison-Mayodan, NC.

The Madison-Mayodan, N.C. Story

A new batch of materials from our partner, Rockingham County Public Library, adds scrapbooks of news clippings, books and booklets about Rockingham County History, images, and more to DigitalNC. Included are two volumes collecting “Remember When” columns from The Madison Messenger, which recount historic events from the town’s past and the “Madison-Mayodan Story” which was a packet put out by the Chamber of Commerce to encourage investment in the community in 1960.  It includes statistics about industry in the town, as well as some great photographs.  

The full batch can be seen at the links below.  

Images:

Learn more about Rockingham County Public Library by visiting their partner page or their website.  


New Issues of The Barker from Walter Williams High School Now Up

Students dream of a star-studded faculty in the 1958 April Fools’ issue.

Six Issues of The Barker, the student paper from Walter Williams High School, are now available on DigitalNC. Walter Williams High School is located in Burlington, North Carolina, and The Barker is still published by the school’s journalism class during the spring semester.

Issues from this batch date from the 1957-1958 academic year and were published on a monthly basis. Included in each issues are news articles related to school happenings, event notices, and pictures of student life. A special April Fools’ issue lets the students’ sense of humor shine through as they take a break from their usual routine.

To learn more about our partner Alamance County Public Libraries, who provided these materials, take a look at their DigitalNC partner page, or visit their website.


Scrapbooks from New Partner, Raleigh Fire Museum, Now Available

Auxiliary Officers from a Raleigh Times clipping in 1953-1954 scrapbook

Image from the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Raleigh Fire Fighters Association Scrapbook [1951-1953]

10 scrapbooks created by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Raleigh Professional Fire Fighters Association Local 548 are now available on DigitalNC. These scrapbooks cover the years 1951-1972 and were provided by our new partner, the Raleigh Fire Museum. The Raleigh Fire Museum houses a collection of artifacts and images representing over 150 years of firefighting in Raleigh, North Carolina.

This group of scrapbooks contains images, correspondence, programs, news clippings, and more documenting both firefighting and social events organized by the Ladies’ Auxiliary. These scrapbooks are organized chronologically and according to type of materials contained within. From the scrapbooks, you get a sense of the social culture surrounding firefighting from the perspective of the spouses and families of firefighters.

To learn more about our partner, the Raleigh Fire Museum, visit their DigitalNC partner page or take a look at their website!


Brookford NC Celebrated in Newly Digitized Book

The author at age 10 on page 22 of Brookford Memories

Brookford Memories, a book contributed by Hickory Public Library, celebrates life in Brookford, NC, a small town in Catawba County. Brookford Memories was written in 2003 by Brookford native Dyke Little, born in 1935. This book contains the chapters “Childhood Memories”, “Brookford Places”, “Brookford Mills”, “Brookford People”, “Brookford Lives”, “Brookford Photos”, “Rosa Clinard’s Album”, “Grandview School”, “Mill Property”, “Church Brochures”, “Myrtle Hunt Scrapbook”, and “More Brookford Photos.”

Through a series of vignettes, interviews, biographies, and historical documents, Little paints a portrait of Brookford as it was during it’s heyday as a mill town. In the introduction, he reflects his childhood during the late 1930s and 1940s saying, “the Depression was over but World War II was starting. This was a time when we all felt closer to each other… Back then the pace of life was slower and people had more time for each other.”

Although Little’s focus is on Brookford, delving into family histories and specific childhood memories, the book touches on themes common to towns all around North Carolina and beyond.

To see more materials from Hickory Public Library, take a look at their DigitalNC partner page, or view their website.


The Latest Batch Q-Notes, LGBT Newspaper from Charlotte, Shows the Paper’s Origins

The newest batch of Q-notes, Charlotte’s LGBT newspaper, adds very early issues of Q-notes to DigitalNC. These issues from 1983 and 1984 were published as a monthly newsletter by Queen City Quordinators (QCQ), a non-profit group established in 1981 by gay activist Don King and lesbian activist Billie Stickell. According the the Q-Notes website,

“The newsletter ended its run in 1984, with the close of the non-profit. In 1986, the newsletter was revived, and the publication was reborn as a monthly, print newspaper. The first issue of the revived community news source was published in June 1986, to coincide with National LGBT Pride Month.”

The early Q-Notes QCQ newsletters shed light on issues facing the LGBT community in Charlotte in the early 1980s and show the some of the grassroots resources and organizations pushing for information, safety, and acceptance. Conferences, meetings, and support groups were highlighted as ways of finding and building communities. Another important resource was the Gay/Lesbian Switchboard, a volunteer-run hotline providing information to Charlotte’s LGBT community.

This batch also includes newer issues of Q-notes from the 2000s, completing our run of Q-notes provided by our partner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte. To see more materials from University of North Carolina at Charlotte visit their DigitalNC partner page or take a look at their website.


See Central Carolina Community College from Above in New Photos

1997 aerial view of Central Carolina Community College’s Lee County Campus, showing construction on the Vocational Technology building (later renamed Joyner Hall)

The path between the Learning Resource Center and Wilkinson Hall on the Lee county main campus of Central Carolina Technical Institute in the snow.

A new batch of photographs from Central Carolina Community College is now available on DigitalNC. These photographs range in date from the 1960s through the 1990s and focus mainly on campus facilities. CCCC was started as Lee County Industrial Education Center in the early 1960s, but underwent name changes in 1965, 1979, and 1988 to become Central Carolina Technical Institute, then Central Carolina Technical College, and finally Central Carolina Community College. These photographs follow the school through periods of growth and change and document how campus looked through all of these stages. Particularly striking is a collection of aerial photographs that shows CCCC’s Lee County Campus from above.

This new batch of photographs joins previously digitized photos from CCCC that focus on student life and academic programs. To see more materials from our partner Central Carolina Community College, visit their DigitalNC partner page or take a look at their website.


10 More High Point Scrapbooks Added to DigitalNC

From page 29 of High Point Scrapbook [1959]

From page 304 of High Point Scrapbook Vol. 52

10 more scrapbooks documenting news in and around High Point, North Carolina are now up on DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library. Materials in these scrapbooks range in date from 1957-1972 are comprised primarily of clippings from newspapers published in the Piedmont Triad. Papers represented include the High Point Enterprise, the Greensboro Daily News, and the Winston-Salem Journal. Five of the scrapbooks are from a volume set and join previously digitized volumes dating back to 1951. Many clippings from this set of scrapbooks deal with municipal and civic issues, and each scrapbook includes a handwritten index in the front.

The other five scrapbooks cover periods of time that overlap with the volume set. They are physically large scrapbooks, and occasionally include an entire page from a newspaper. Newspaper pages and clippings cover a wide array local and regional news.

To view the new scrapbooks, visit the links below:

To see more materials from our partner, the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library, visit their DigitalNC partner page or take a look at their website.


New series of manuscripts from Edgecombe County Memorial Library dates back to 1777

The receipt for a tuition payment from the Eason Thomas Papers.

The beginning of the letter to James Johnson regarding the death of his son in 1861.

A collection of manuscripts provided by Edgecombe County Memorial Library is now available on DigitalNC. This collection is comprised primarily of personal financial papers from Edgecombe County residents dating back as far as 1777, with the most recent documents dating to 1917. The manuscripts are separated out by the name of the individual or family to which the documents pertain. Items like land deeds, receipts of payment, and court documents concerning the transfer of money and debt are frequently found in these collections. Additionally, some letters of personal correspondence are included. One striking letter was written from Redding W. Thomas and J. W. Gardner to James Johnson informing him about the death of his son Charles during the the Civil War.

These manuscripts are useful for tracking family history as well as land use and the economic activities of Edgecombe County during the last 1700s through the 1800s. Families represented include the Long, Woodard, Barnes, Thomas, Horn, Johnston, Johnson, Batts, Farmer, and Price families of Edgecombe County.

Make sure to browse through these new manuscripts on DigitalNC  and learn more about the papers on the Hugh Johnston Collection exhibit page. To see more materials from Edgecombe County Memorial Library, please check out their DigitalNC partner page and take a look a their website.


New Yearbooks from Elkin High Schol Now Available

From page 85 of The Elk [1967]

The 1949-1959 and 1964-1968 editions of The Elk, a yearbook from Elkin High School, are now available on DigitalNC thanks to our partner, Surry Community College. Elkin High School is located in Elkin, North Carolina, a town in Surry and Wilkes Counties. These edition joins previously digitized editions of The Elk from 1947-1948, and 1960-1963.

Elkin School Song

The Alma Mater, from the 1951 yearbook

 

These yearbooks contain class photos, photos of student life, and photos of clubs, sports and activities. Some of the yearbooks contain fun extras like class prophecies, tongue in cheek “last will and testaments” from the senior class, and even the school song! Yearbooks on DigitalNC are fully text searchable, and are a great resource for genealogy.

To see more materials from our partner, Surry Community College, visit their DigitalNC partner page, or take a look at their website.


New Batch of Course Catalogs from Johnson C. Smith University

Image from the cover of the 2006-2007 JCSU catalog.

Cover of the 1994-1995 JCSU catalog.

A new batch of catalogs from Johnson C. Smith University is now available on DigitalNC. Johnson C. Smith University is a historically black four-year research university located in Charlotte, North Carolina. It was established in 1867 as Biddle Memorial Institute but changed its name to Biddle University in 1876, and to Johnson C. Smith University in 1923. Currently JCSU serves over 1,600 students and offers 24 different undergraduate degree programs and a graduate Master of Social Work degree program.

Catalogs in this batch cover two spans of time. The first run of catalogs covers 1878-1909 when the school was Biddle University. The more recent run covers JCSU from 1964-2009. School catalogs include course offerings as well as information such as academic schedules, school history, and more. These newly digitized catalogs join previously digitized JCSU catalogs and bulletins from the 1920s-1960s.

In addition to these catalogs, make sure to take a look at other materials from JCSU including yearbooks and maps. To learn more about Johnson C. Smith University, visit their DigitalNC partner page or their website.