Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries by Julia Gootzeit


Newspaper serving Lumbee Tribe members in Robeson County, The Carolina Indian Voice, is now available

Headline from the September 24, 1998 issue of The Carolina Indian Voice.

Almost ten years of The Carolina Indian Voice, a newspaper out of Pembroke, North Carolina, are now up on DigitalNC thanks to our partner the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Carolina Indian Voice was established in 1973 and was published on a weekly basis until 2005. Issues from 1996-2005 are now available digitally. The paper primarily served the interests of members of the Lumbee Tribe living in Robeson County, who make up more than a third of the population of Robeson County and almost 90% of the town of Pembroke.

The paper includes articles and editorials concerning local issues such as politics, social events, civic projects, and more. Although there is a strong focus specifically on issues relevant to members of the Lumbee Tribe, the paper also covers news and events pertaining to American Indians throughout the state of North Carolina and nationally.

Image from the 1998 First Annual Fall Pow Wow in Hoke County as seen in the November 11, 1998 issue of The North Carolina Indian Voice.

Headline from the February 25, 1999 issue of The North Carolina Indian Voice.

The paper also focuses on advocacy with many articles covering struggles against the discrimination American Indians face regarding employment, education, and housing in the United States.

To browse through issues of The North Carolina Indian Voice click here. To see more materials from our partner, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, visit their partner page.


Henderson Institute graduation programs from 1924 onward

A student’s photograph taped into a commencement booklet from 1933

Graduation programs and invitations from the Henderson Institute, provided by the Henderson Institute Historical Museum, are now available on DigitalNC. the Henderson Institute was a high school started in 1887 by the Freedmen’s Mission Board of the United Presbyterian Church. It was closed after the 1969-1970 school year due to integration. Through the years that the school was open, it was the only secondary school open to African Americans in Vance County. Part of the original school building now houses the Henderson Institute Historical Museum.

The collection of 19 graduation programs and invitations date from 1924 through the school’s final 1970 graduation. Although each program is structured differently, many include the full names of the members of the senior graduating class along with a schedule of events.

Also in this collection are five theater programs from the Henderson Institute. These include programs for student productions of The People Versus Maxine Lowe, Rest Assured, and Once in a Lifetime.

Click here to browse through the programs. To learn more about the Henderson Institute Historical Museum, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.


Yearbooks and city directories for Cumberland County now available

Page 56 from the 1969 Smithsonian

A superlative from the 1963 LAFAMAC

14 more Fayetteville yearbooks and 12 more city directories from our partner Cumberland County Public Library are now available on DigitalNC. The yearbooks include 7 editions of The LAFAMAC by Fayetteville High School from 1963-1969, and 7 editions of The Smithsonian by E. E. Smith Senior High School from 1956, 1963, 1964, and 1966-1969. These yearbooks join previously digitized editions. The city directories in this batch cover Fayetteville from 1937, 1939, 1941, 1954-1955, 1957, and 1963-1969.

The LAFAMAC shows a glimpse at student life at the primarily white Fayetteville High School (now called the Terry Sanford High School) with The Smithsonian doing the same at the primarily black E. E. Smith Senior High School. Both yearbooks include student portraits, superlatives, events, and activities. Both schools continue to serve the Fayetteville area today.

To browse through materials from Cumberland County Public Library take a look at their partner page. To learn more about Cumberland County Public Library visit their website.


Over 1000 issues of The Farmville Enterprise digitized

Issues of The Farmville Enterprise, provided by our partner the Farmville Public Library, are now on DigitalNC. The Farmville Enterprise is a weekly paper that was established in 1910, and continues to serve the Farmville, North Carolina community to this day. Farmville is a town located in Pitt County, just west of Greenville, that currently has just over 5,000 residents. The digitized portions now available cover 1914-1941.

The headline of the special November 11, 1918 issue of The Farmville Enterprise announcing the end of WWI. Usually the paper was published on Fridays, but for this date there was an exception.

An advertisement in the March 19, 1915 issue of the Farmville Enterprise for a screening of The Battle of Gettysburg, a silent film that has no surviving copies.

The Farmville Enterprise carried items of local interest such as local news stories, birth and death notices, event coverage, and advertisements, as well as national and international stories. The newly digitized selections contains news stories about many profound events ranging from coverage of WWI to effects of the Great Depression and the start of WWII. These stories are placed next to stories concerning the everyday goings on within the Farmville community.

Click here to browse through issues of The Farmville Enterprise. To see more digitized materials from the Farmville Public Library, visit their partner page. To learn more about the Farmville Public Library, take a look at their website.


More than 60 high school yearbooks added to DigitalNC

Faculty portraits in the 1963 Longhorn by Woodington High School.

More than 60 high school yearbooks provided by Eastern Carolina University are now up on DigitalNC. The schools represented are located across central and eastern North Carolina and include schools from Pitt County, Franklin County, Stokes County, Washington County, Hertford County, Lenoir County, Martin County, Halifax County, Wilson County, and Johnston County. The dates of these yearbooks range from 1927-1970. Together, they give an overview of secondary education across the state, with many of the editions covering the time surrounding desegregation efforts. These yearbooks include individual and class portraits as well photographs documenting activities, clubs, sports, and academics.

Senior portraits from the Kay Aitch Ess 1927 yearbook by Grainger High School

Follow the links below to browse yearbooks from the schools included in this batch:

To see more materials from our partner who provided these yearbooks, visit East Carolina University’s partner page, or take a look at their website.


Boy Scout Memories Saved in Scrapbook from Wilson County

A scout making a fire in 1925 as seen on page 17

Boy Scout troop on page 78

A scrapbook provided by the Wilson County Public Library documents the adventures of Boy Scouts in Wilson County from 1925-1932. This scrapbook contains images of swimming, hiking, tent life, boating, troop portraits, and more. Many images contain handwritten identifications noting the date, activity, location, or individuals in the images.

The Boy Scouts of America was founded in 1910, so this scrapbook documents early BSA groups in Wilson County. Boys of all ages seem to have taken part, with many activities looking similar to Scouting that takes place today. One image from 1929 shows boys swimming using the “buddy system” where each camper is in charge of monitoring the swimming of their buddy. This system is a safety protocol still advocated by the Boy Scouts today.

To take a look at the scrapbook click here. To see more materials from Wilson County Public Library visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.

Scouts swimming using the “buddy system” in 1929 as seen on page 76


Amazing panoramic WWI images from Randolph County Public Library now available!

North Carolina Brigade at Camp Stewart, El Paso, Texas

Panoramic photos of Company K and the 120th Infantry, provided by Randolph County Public Library, are now online at DigitalNC. These photos, taken from 1914-1919, show Company K, which was comprised of men from Asheboro, and the larger North Carolina Brigade in a variety of locations.

Company K, 120th Infantry 30th (Old Hickory) Division at Camp Jackson, S.C.

The locations of the photos include Camp Sevier and Camp Jackson, both located in South Carolina, and Camp Stewart in El Paso, Texas. One photo of Camp Sevier shows an aerial shot of soldiers in formation along with camp structures and buildings. Many of these photos include some identifying information including names of soldiers or commanding officers in the photo. The panoramic nature of these photos gives the viewer a unique sense of these camps and required us to use special photo equipment reserved for digitizing large materials!

120th Infantry at Camp Sevier, S.C.

Click here to browse the photos. To see more materials from Randolph County Public Library visit their partner page or take a look at their website.

Company K, 120th Infantry 30th Division at Camp Sevier, S.C.


New additions to the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection

An image from the funeral program of Margaret Rozzetta Stephens Fuller

More funeral programs and obituaries from Durham County Library are now online. These are part of the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection and cover funerals in and around Durham County from 1934-2013. R. Kelly Bryant (1917-2015) was a Durham historian and active community member who collected the stories of African-American Durham residents via obituaries and funeral programs.

The newly digitized additions cover the last names Cobb through Furtick. These join the first batch from this collection which cover the names Adams through Coachman. The obituaries and funeral programs are fully text searchable, and are a great source of genealogical information. Birth and death dates, names of family members, and biographical information are often included.

You can browse or search the digitized items in the collection by visiting the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection exhibit page on DigitalNC. More information is also available through the collection’s finding aid on the Durham County Library’s website.

To learn more about Durham County Library, visit their DigitalNC partner page or take a look at their website.


Two decades of yearbooks from newest partner Johnston Community College

The Practical Nurse Club in the 1972 edition of Retrospect

Yearbooks from Johnston Community College are now available on DigitalNC. These yearbooks date from 1972-1992 and follow the school’s shift in focus from a technical institute to a community college. Johnston Community College, first called Johnston County Technical Institute, was established in 1969 and became a community college in 1987.  JCC is located 30 miles east of Raleigh and offers a range of degrees and certificates in fields such as health science, business, and education.

Image from the 1992 edition of Retrospect

The Retrospect yearbooks give a glimpse of student life at the school and document clubs, activities, events, and academic programs. The earlier yearbooks feature sports like basketball and cheerleading, and clubs like the Practical Nurse Club and the Business Club. Later yearbooks feature a greater range of activities including Floriculture Design Club, Art Club, and many more. This change reflects an increase in student body and growth in programmatic offerings through the years.

To browse these yearbooks, click here. To learn more about Johnston Community College take a look at their partner page, or visit their website.


2017 yearbook from UNC Pembroke now online

The 2017 edition of The Indianhead, University of North Carolina at Pembroke’s yearbook, is now available on DigitalNC. This edition joins many previously digitized UNC Pembroke yearbooks dating as far back as 1942.

The 2017 edition of The Indianhead documents many important moments from the academic year including graduation, sports games, performances, and more. This recent edition also contains a two-page spread documenting the effects of Hurricane Matthew, which struck North Carolina in October 2016,  on the UNC Pembroke community. The yearbook states, “UNCP campus [was] submerged in up to almost 2 feet of water in some areas… this collage includes pictures of the damage dealt, the community response to the aftermath, and reactions from students who were directly affected by the storm.”

Part of a collage documenting Hurricane Matthew’s effects on the UNCP campus.

To learn more about UNC Pembroke, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.