Digital North Carolina Blog

Digital North Carolina Blog

This blog is maintained by the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and features highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina.

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Viewing entries by Julia Gootzeit


Two More Decades of The Carolina Indian Voice Now Available

A snow celebration in the February 22, 1979 issue

Almost two decades of the newspaper The Carolina Indian Voice, from 1977-1996, are now up on DigitalNC. Provided by our partner, UNC at Chapel Hill, this batch joins previously digitized issues that date from 1996-2005. The Carolina Indian Voice was established in 1973 and continued through 2005, so now nearly the entire print run is digitized.

A painting of the Carolina Indian Voice building as shown in the January 10, 1980 issue

The Carolina Indian Voice  is one of North Carolina’s oldest American Indian newspapers. It served members of the Lumbee Tribe living in Robeson County including the town of Pembroke, which is the seat of the Lumbee tribe of North Carolina, as well as the home of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, a historically American Indian University.

The Carolina Indian Voice was published weekly on Thursdays and was a source for all sorts of local news. Topics covered included local politics and civic issues, cultural events, school happenings, and more. Articles on local and national civil rights issues and efforts to end racial discrimination pertinent to Robeson County’s American Indian population were also covered alongside everyday happenings in the county.

An article on H.R. 12996 regarding federal recognition of American Indian tribes in the August 24, 1978 issue

Click here to take browse through the digitized issues. To see more materials from our partner UNC at Chapel Hill, visit their DigitalNC partner page or take a look at their website.

The fifth grade winner of the Pembroke Elementary Read-A-Thon in the December 8, 1977 issue


Materials from our new partner, the Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County, document the North Carolina Veterans Park

Artist Aaron Wallace casts the hand of veteran Will A. Harrison from Guilford County.

Veteran Timothy Morton from Stanly County pictured with the cast of his hand at the North Carolina Veterans Park.

Materials from our new partner, the Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County, are now available on DigitalNC. These materials document the creation of installations for the North Carolina Veterans Park. The park is located in downtown Fayetteville, and was formally dedicated on July 4, 2011. Installations and plazas in the park explore the theme a “Veteran’s Journey: life before, during, and after service.”

The materials on DigitalNC concern the creation of the Oath of Service Wall and the Community Columns that are located in the Community Plaza of the park. The Oath of Service Wall includes

Materials from each county are represented individually on DigitalNC, and include information about the veterans, community members, and artists that facilitated the casting. Many include photographs of the hand molding process and biographical details.

To browse materials in the North Carolina Veterans Park collection, click here. To learn more about the Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County, take a look at their partner page, or visit their website.


Complete Set of Over 1000 Photos from Benson Museum of Local History Now Online!

The last batch from a set of photos contributed by the Benson Museum of Local History is now up on DigitalNC. We embarked on this digitization project in 2015, and the complete set of over 1000 images is now available. Benson is a town located in Johnston County with a current population of around 170,000 people.

This last batch includes photos of historic Benson residences, Benson businesses, and portraits of Benson community members. The set as a whole is comprised of a wide range of images documenting many aspects of life in Benson. The collection includes photographs of events like the State Annual Singing Convention and the Benson Mule Day Parade, as well as images of less formal group gatherings, such as family barbecues, school events, and church groups. Also included are class portraits, family portraits, individual portraits of town members, street scenes, photos of businesses, churches, homes and more. Most of the photographs date to around the 1920s, but the collection includes photos from as recent as 2003 and photos dating as far back as 1870. 

Click here to browse through the complete set of photographs. To read previous blog posts documenting additions of new batches along the way click here.

To see more materials from the Benson Museum of Local History, please visit their contributor page. To learn more about the museum and plan your next visit, please their homepage.


The 14th Street School and more from Forsyth County Public Library

Photo in the 14th Street School scrapbook showing classes in front of the school.

Practicing trumpet for the school band in the 14th Street School Scrapbook.

A batch of new materials from Forsyth County Public Library are now available on DigitalNC. Included are two scrapbooks, one from the 14th Street School in Winston-Salem and one from the Society for the Study of Afro-American History in Winston-Salem. Also included are materials from the Malloy/Jordan East Winston Heritage Center and the East Winston Branch Library, and yearbooks from St. Anne’s Academy and Atkins High School.

The 14th Street School educated African-American students in Forsyth County from its founding in 1924 through the 1970s. This scrapbook collects photographs of student activities and events. Included are photographs of sports teams, the school band, dance performances, and class portraits. The 14th Street School acted as a community hub and created lasting bonds within its student body which remain strong to this day. Despite its closure, alumni continue to hold reunions and advocate for the school as an important part of Winston-Salem history.

Additionally a scrapbook from the Society for the Study of Afro-American History in Winston-Salem (now called the Society for the Study of African American History in Winston Salem) collects calendars created from 1989 through 1997. These calendars include images and write-ups of Winston-Salem history and events as well as photographs and information about Society events.

A page of the 1989 calendar by the Society for the Study of Afro-American History showing a reunion of the 14th Street School classes of 1931-1939.

The Maroon and Gold 1948-1949 yearbook from Atkins High School and The Annette 1952 yearbook from St. Anne’s Academy are also now available. Atkins High School was founded in 1930 for African-American students in Winston-Salem. The school was named for Dr. Simon Green Atkins, the founder and first president of Winston-Salem University. Dr. Atkins was born into slavery in 1863 on a farm in North Carolina but was able to receive a public education after the end of the Civil War. He went on to attend St. Augustine College and subsequently dedicated his life to improving education for African Americans.

To see these and the other items from this batch of materials, visit the links below.

To see other materials from Forsyth County Public Library visit their partner page or take a look at their website.

The 1948-1949 14th Street School basketball team as seen in the scrapbook.

 


Learn Beauty Tips from Southeastern Community College Cosmetology Club Scrapbooks

Winners and models from the 1993 Spring Hair Show.

Club members practicing on wigs in the 1973-1974 scrapbook.

9 scrapbooks provided by our partner Southeastern Community College document the Cosmetology Club at Southeastern Community College from the 1970s through the early 2000s. Southeastern Community College is located between Chadbourn and Whiteville in Columbus County, North Carolina. Southeastern Community College currently offers a cosmetology degree program and sponsors a cosmetology club open to all cosmetology students. Current club activities include educational programs, trips, social events, and more.

The club’s history is captured through these 9 scrapbooks. The scrapbooks contain photographs, news clippings, and programs pertaining to the club. Events like the annual Spring Hair Show as well as educational demonstrations and club officer elections are covered.

The fun photographs in these scrapbooks show the evolution of popular hair, makeup, and beauty trends through the decades, and give a behind the scenes view of how iconic looks are put together. Club members, who put long hours into learning the latest styles, often practiced hair or makeup techniques on themselves or each other, making for some fabulous photos.

To browse the scrapbooks follow the links below:

To see more materials from Southeastern Community College, visit their partner page or take a look at their website.

A hair styling demo seen in the 1977-1978 scrapbook.

 


New scrapbooks continue the story of High Point through news clippings

A news clipping from April 22, 1959 shows residents of High Point at the polls for a local election.

Four new High Point scrapbooks from our partner, the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library, are now available at DigitalNC. These scrapbooks, dating from 1959-1962, join previously digitized volumes dating back to 1952. The scrapbooks contain news clippings primarily from the High Point Enterprise and Greensboro Daily News. The clippings are arranged in chronological order, and in many cases articles were pasted into the scrapbooks in an overlapping fashion so taking multiple images of each page was necessary during the digitizing effort.

A slew of excited headlines marked the introduction of a flight route from Chicago to the High Point-Greensboro Airport. This headline is from April 14, 1959.

Clippings in the scrapbooks pertain to goings on around High Point and Greensboro including coverage of local political races, decisions about town planning and development, civic initiatives, special events, and advertisements for local businesses. There is a particular emphasis on municipal issues such as land annexation and zoning.

To view the scrapbooks visit the links below:

To see more materials and learn more about the Heritage Research Center at High Point Public Library visit their partner page or take a look at their website.


New Additions to Rockingham County Legacy Exhibit Incude Garden Club Yearbooks, Scrapbooks, and More

The cover of Bicentennial: North Carolina History Volume 1

The Stoneville Garden Club song printed in the 1952-1953 garden club yearbook

The newest batch of materials from our partner Rockingham County Public Library includes 3 scrapbooks, over 20 garden club yearbooks, 3 school yearbooks, and more. The scrapbooks are comprised of news clippings pertaining to the National Bicentennial Celebration of North Carolina Independence that took place from 1975-1976. Each volume collects articles chronologically in the order that they were published.

The garden club yearbooks document the Stoneville Garden Club from 1937-1999. These yearbooks feature lists of the year’s officers, committees, programs, and the club’s constitution. The yearbooks also feature the club’s song which starts “Plant a Shrub, a Flower, a Tree!” and decorative covers in the club’s colors–pink and green.

The cover of the 1937 club yearbook

Also included in this batch are the 1939 and  1940 editions of The Pilot by Leaksville High School and the 1944 edition of The Crest by Draper High School.

To see all of the materials in the Rockingham County Legacy exhibit, visit the exhibit’s homepage. To learn more about Rockingham County Public Library visit their partner page or take a look at their website.


New Batch of Q-notes Traces LGBT Issues from 1997-2004

Youngsters at Charlotte Pride 2002 as seen in the May 25, 2002 issue of Q-notes

More issues of the newspaper Q-notes, provided by our partner the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, are now up on DigitalNC. These new issues cover the years 1997-2004 and join previously digitized issues from 1986-1996.

Q-notes is a newspaper that serves the LGBT community of Charlotte as well as the greater LGBT community in the state of North Carolina. Over the years that have been digitized, Q-notes grew as a publication from an 8 page newspaper published once a month to a 40 page paper published every two weeks. Currently Q-notes is published both online and in print form.

With the expansion of the publication, Q-notes was able to tackle more content ranging from coverage of local events, news stories, and advertisements to national and international news stories and features. The late ’90s and early ’00s was a time of many changes for the United Sates LGBT community, and Q-notes articles reported on the changing attitudes and experiences surrounding LGBT culture.

Headline from the January 20, 2001 issue of Q-notes

Q-notes was able to report many firsts. The first legal same-sex wedding in Canada was held in 2001, followed by the first legal same-sex wedding in the United states in 2004. In 2001, the first openly gay soldier completed his term of service in the United States Army Reserves despite facing potential discharge. LGBT centers opened up throughout the state of North Carolina and there were many pride festivals, marches, and demonstrations on both local and national levels.

Headline from the January 22, 2000 issue of Q-notes.

Lt. Steve May, the first openly gay soldier to complete his army term of service as seen in the April 28, 2001 issue of Q-notes

From an article on Wold AIDS Day in the November 23, 2002 Q-notes

In addition to these achievements, articles from this batch of Q-notes also reported on discrimination and violence that LGBT community members continued and still continue to face. These issues often played out in the arena of politics. Q-notes kept a close eye on the 2000 US presidential election and reported on both overtures and discouraging comments made to and about the LGBT community by candidates. Local politics were also covered, with Q-notes reporting on local elections, giving endorsements to candidates, and identifying local issues that would be of interest to Q-notes readers.

During this time Q-notes also continued to report on the AIDS crisis. Although by the end of the ’90s new AIDS diagnoses were decreasing, many LGBT individuals and the LGBT community continued to be affected. Awareness campaigns were championed by Q-notes, and articles intended to reduce stigma surrounding both the disease and ideas of safe sex were published.

Though turbulent times for the LGBT community, Q-notes continued to promote spaces where LGBT individuals could feel safe, comfortable, and have fun. Monthly event calendars and coverage of community activities remained strong throughout the years. With more pages in Q-notes, a regular culture section was established. Fun advertisements continued to permeate the pages, both from business specifically catering to the LGBT community, and increasingly from larger national companies.

An advertisement from the December 7, 2002 Q-notes

To browse all of the digitized issues of Q-notes click here. To learn more about the University of North Carolina at Charlotte visit their website, or check out their partner page to see previously digitized materials. To see more recent issues of Q-notes, visit the Q-notes website.

 

 

Newspaper serving Lumbee Tribe members in Robeson County, The Carolina Indian Voice, is now available

Headline from the September 24, 1998 issue of The Carolina Indian Voice.

Almost ten years of The Carolina Indian Voice, a newspaper out of Pembroke, North Carolina, are now up on DigitalNC thanks to our partner the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Carolina Indian Voice was established in 1973 and was published on a weekly basis until 2005. Issues from 1996-2005 are now available digitally. The paper primarily served the interests of members of the Lumbee Tribe living in Robeson County, who make up more than a third of the population of Robeson County and almost 90% of the town of Pembroke.

The paper includes articles and editorials concerning local issues such as politics, social events, civic projects, and more. Although there is a strong focus specifically on issues relevant to members of the Lumbee Tribe, the paper also covers news and events pertaining to American Indians throughout the state of North Carolina and nationally.

Image from the 1998 First Annual Fall Pow Wow in Hoke County as seen in the November 11, 1998 issue of The North Carolina Indian Voice.

Headline from the February 25, 1999 issue of The North Carolina Indian Voice.

The paper also focuses on advocacy with many articles covering struggles against the discrimination American Indians face regarding employment, education, and housing in the United States.

To browse through issues of The North Carolina Indian Voice click here. To see more materials from our partner, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, visit their partner page.


Henderson Institute graduation programs from 1924 onward

A student’s photograph taped into a commencement booklet from 1933

Graduation programs and invitations from the Henderson Institute, provided by the Henderson Institute Historical Museum, are now available on DigitalNC. the Henderson Institute was a high school started in 1887 by the Freedmen’s Mission Board of the United Presbyterian Church. It was closed after the 1969-1970 school year due to integration. Through the years that the school was open, it was the only secondary school open to African Americans in Vance County. Part of the original school building now houses the Henderson Institute Historical Museum.

The collection of 19 graduation programs and invitations date from 1924 through the school’s final 1970 graduation. Although each program is structured differently, many include the full names of the members of the senior graduating class along with a schedule of events.

Also in this collection are five theater programs from the Henderson Institute. These include programs for student productions of The People Versus Maxine Lowe, Rest Assured, and Once in a Lifetime.

Click here to browse through the programs. To learn more about the Henderson Institute Historical Museum, visit their partner page, or take a look at their website.